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Looking for thoughts on a 5' back blade vs. a york rake for my 1025r. Just had an area of my property that was once an old fence row cleared. Had some stumps ground and brush cleared. Ground is tore up with a lot of holes and debris. Will probably need to bring in some top soil to smooth things out, and plant grass seed in the fall. I have access to a 5' back blade, but would have to buy a york rake, as no one rents them. I can smooth some of it with the FEL, or by hand, but if this an opportunity to buy another implement, I am good with it. Any thoughts, brand, size etc..?
 

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Fit Rite Hydraulics
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Looking for thoughts on a 5' back blade vs. a york rake for my 1025r. Just had an area of my property that was once an old fence row cleared. Had some stumps ground and brush cleared. Ground is tore up with a lot of holes and debris. Will probably need to bring in some top soil to smooth things out, and plant grass seed in the fall. I have access to a 5' back blade, but would have to buy a york rake, as no one rents them. I can smooth some of it with the FEL, or by hand, but if this an opportunity to buy another implement, I am good with it. Any thoughts, brand, size etc..?
I would seriously consider something from ETA.
 

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For leveling topsoil, nothing beats a York rake, especially if you have a large area to do. You will want gauge wheels.

You can do OK with a blade, but you will still need to rake by hand before you seed. That being said, a blade is great for clearing snow. I bought a blade first for exactly the same job as you and decided after one day of use that I really needed the rake. The blade wasn't a waste as it gets extensive use in the winter.

Al
 

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I have had a rear blade for years now and it is still sitting in the same place as the day I bought it. York rake and land plane are a different story.
 

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You might consider a box blade

I have a 48" box blade and a 72" landscape rake with wheels. I use both of them lot. The box blade does a great job of leveling out uneven ground, and a so-so job of finishing it for planting. My rake is great for the final finishing, but it won't dig in enough to level out ruts. My suggestion is to either get both or get a box blade if you are just getting one implement.

If you get a box blade, look for one that has adequate lift height. Heavier is advantageous if you have an FEL because it provides extra rear ballast. Although some say that extra weight helps the BB dig, my experience has been that the rippers do the digging, not the weight. If I were buying a new unit and had to make a trade off between weight and lift height, then I would go for the lift. the 48" blade is perfect for the 1025r. If I were buying again, I might go for a 54", but definitely no bigger.

If you get a landscape rake, wheels are a must (at least for me). Here again, watch for lift height. I have a very heavy Woods LR72 rake, and the 1025r lifts it with ease, but inadequate lift height is sometimes a (minor) problem.

But, my suggestions won't help with snow removal. (I just use the FEL, because we don't get much snow in MD.)
 

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I have had a rear blade for years now and it is still sitting in the same place as the day I bought it. York rake and land plane are a different story.
I pretty much only use my rear blade for snow removal. If you do decide to go with a rake be sure to get one with gauge wheels. I ignored the advice and initially bought one without and it was near useless at grading things. I was fortunate that I was able to add the Tarter wheels to my rake and now it is much more useful.

BTW... if you are interested, Land Pride makes a landscape rake with gauge wheels that also has a flip-down blade for dirt work. I'm not sure how the price compares to simply buying a rake and blade but it might be worth checking out. I believe it is the LR16-series rakes.
 

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I pretty much only use my rear blade for snow removal. If you do decide to go with a rake be sure to get one with gauge wheels. I ignored the advice and initially bought one without and it was near useless at grading things. I was fortunate that I was able to add the Tarter wheels to my rake and now it is much more useful.

BTW... if you are interested, Land Pride makes a landscape rake with gauge wheels that also has a flip-down blade for dirt work. I'm not sure how the price compares to simply buying a rake and blade but it might be worth checking out. I believe it is the LR16-series rakes.
Dang it, that is pretty cool. Now Ive got a different attachment added to the list.

You are right, its the LR16 series. Looks like its got sides on the blade portion, or maybe they are an option, but it seems like that would be sort of a jack of all trades implement good for most leveling work, except where ripper teeth on a box blade might be needed.

Ive got to say also, Id never even considered a rake for leveling. I always thought the box blade, and to a lesser extent the rear blade, were the go to for leveling.
This forum teaches me something new all the time.
 

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Dang it, that is pretty cool. Now Ive got a different attachment added to the list.

You are right, its the LR16 series. Looks like its got sides on the blade portion, or maybe they are an option, but it seems like that would be sort of a jack of all trades implement good for most leveling work, except where ripper teeth on a box blade might be needed.

Ive got to say also, Id never even considered a rake for leveling. I always thought the box blade, and to a lesser extent the rear blade, were the go to for leveling.
This forum teaches me something new all the time.
I think it depends on what degree of leveling you want to do and the condition of your soil. If you have hard packed dirt that needs ripped loose and then graded smooth the box blade with ripper teeth is going to be the only tool for that job.

If your soil is already loose and you want to level it out a bit then the rake will do fine. It will also rake out any large stones or yard debris remaining.

I'm sure those sides on the Land Pride blade are optional just like they are on the standard rear blades. About the only disadvantage to the combo unit that I can think is it might be hard to grade by pushing the blade backwards against the curve. I do that all the time with my rear blade to smooth the gravel without the cutting edge digging in.
 

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I think it depends on what degree of leveling you want to do and the condition of your soil. If you have hard packed dirt that needs ripped loose and then graded smooth the box blade with ripper teeth is going to be the only tool for that job.

If your soil is already loose and you want to level it out a bit then the rake will do fine. It will also rake out any large stones or yard debris remaining.

I'm sure those sides on the Land Pride blade are optional just like they are on the standard rear blades. About the only disadvantage to the combo unit that I can think is it might be hard to grade by pushing the blade backwards against the curve. I do that all the time with my rear blade to smooth the gravel without the cutting edge digging in.
+1 on everything above. I will add that I don't have much luck pushing with my box blade because the blade digs in.
About all I can do with it is consolidate a couple of loads from the BB so that I can get a better scoop with the FEL. (And every time that I get a good full bucket, I think that it would be nice to have a heavier BB to counter balance it.)
 

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Fit Rite Hydraulics
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+1 on everything above. I will add that I don't have much luck pushing with my box blade because the blade digs in.
About all I can do with it is consolidate a couple of loads from the BB so that I can get a better scoop with the FEL. (And every time that I get a good full bucket, I think that it would be nice to have a heavier BB to counter balance it.)
Shorten your top link so that the front cutting edge is lower than the rear cutting edge and the blade will not dig in, assuming that you are talking about pushing in reverse. For a typical box blade, I fail to see how anyone has the patience to even use one without having a hydraulic top link.
 

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Well, I have all three, box blade, rear blade and landscape rake and I can tell you that the landscape rake gets used by far the most. However, if you have a lot of leveling work to start with, then you probably should be using a rear blade or a box blade, then switch to the landscape rake for the finishing touches. If you have brush to clear and it is loose, then the landscape rake is the best option. The landscape rake also works great in putting a nice finishing touch on a gravel driveway. Unless you want all three implements, save your money on the box blade and go for the landscape rake. You will find plenty of uses for it.

Dave
 
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