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title say s it all, new 2038 and need a rear blade. I know a 6 ft would be perfect but found a 5ft with hyd angle cheap o na dealer lot and wondering if it big enough
 

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title say s it all, new 2038 and need a rear blade. I know a 6 ft would be perfect but found a 5ft with hyd angle cheap o na dealer lot and wondering if it big enough
Five foot will not cover your wheel tracks when angled. I use a Landpride 7'. Love it for snow.
 

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I have a 7 footer for my 2032R. Wouldn’t go any smaller.
 

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title say s it all, new 2038 and need a rear blade. I know a 6 ft would be perfect but found a 5ft with hyd angle cheap o na dealer lot and wondering if it big enough
Big enough for what use? What do you plan on using it for? There may be a function that you have in mind where not covering the track with the blade would still work for you, but as already stated above a 5’ won’t cover the rear track when angled-though as I said-based in what you want to use it for that may not be a problem for you. Does it offset at all, that may make a difference as well?

As far as the hydraulic angle, are you setup to be able to use it? Or will you have to add a rear hydraulic remote? That’ll add to the overall cost possibly making a manual model less expensive
 

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Ranger how is that blade when its loaded up? Does your blade offset? Does it try to turn the tractor?

I am asking because i have somewhat beefy 6 ft blade on my 3720 that i had gotten for my previous B3030 ( which happens to weigh about what a 2032 does)
its too small on the 3720 and there is a chance i might go up to a used 4720 so i am contemplating an 8 footer for the 3720 (snow and light grading)

I have a 7 footer for my 2032R. Wouldn’t go any smaller.
 

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I would think as long as you had enough front ballast, an 8 footer would be fine on a 4 series. The 7 footer I have is a beast and the 2032R stays the course. “Light” grading? No problem, in my onion.

https://youtu.be/rQpyBhvyAnQ
 

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i figured it would be ok on a 4 series- probably would be the right size for snow etc.
I was wondering if i could get away with it on a 3 series for a while, sort of like which is the least bad, 7 foot on a 4 series or 8 ft on a 3 series

I thought that maybe if you had success with a 7 ft on a 2032r i might be able to use an 8 on a tractor weighing 50% more

Thanks again for your thoughts (or anybody else who wants to chime in)

I would think as long as you had enough front ballast, an 8 footer would be fine on a 4 series. The 7 footer I have is a beast and the 2032R stays the course. “Light” grading? No problem, in my onion.

https://youtu.be/rQpyBhvyAnQ
 

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For what it's worth

I have tried various sizes on my 790. I can run a 7' on dirt/gravel ok but deep snow or snow/ice combo can make it turn the tractor around or crab at a serious angle. It's really helpful to offset the blade to counteract this. If the blade is angled with the right forward and the left back it would normally turn the tractor to the left in deep snow. So I offset the blade slightly to the right and it mostly goes straight. (Left and right as viewed from the back.)

I really like the ability to offset the blade not only for snow but also because I can keep the tractor in the traveled portion of a road and still scrape the sides of the road and pull back gravel, cut out ruts etc. The offset is almost a must for cleaning a ditch out as well.

For ordinary situations, you want to be able to cover the wheel tracks with the blade angled. You also want to be able to spin the blade backwards without hitting the tires or doing odd gymnastics. As a practical matter, that limits the width of the blade to some extent although wider blades usually also have a deeper reach from the 3PH which helps some.

If you use a blade for dirt/gravel then weight is your friend. There's no down pressure on the 3ph so it's the weight of the blade and the curve of the moldboard/cutting edge to keep it from chattering and leaving a rough surface. You can do a rough comparison by looking at the weight of the blade and divide by the width so you get pounds/foot of blade. Normally, a wider blade also has more pounds/foot because the extra stress requires more steel not only on the blade but also the rest of the assembly. Too much weight in snow isn't good as you can tear up asphalt or concrete, cut through snow and into gravel etc. unless you are really careful or use a soft cutting edge. There's a whole discussion on here somewhere about rubber edges vs. cutting PVC pipes for use in snow so I won't repeat all that.

Treefarmer
 

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Thanks, seems like your experience matches Rangers
Interesting observation on the offset function offsetting the the turning effect of the angled blade.
1 additional point for a longer blade to me is that you can angle more ( to keep wet snow rolling off the blade well) and still clean a good swath. Too it seems that a bit longer allows you to do your offset and still clear your tire on the side that the snow spills to.

I imagine that more weight in the front bucket might also reduce crabbing somewhat.




I have tried various sizes on my 790. I can run a 7' on dirt/gravel ok but deep snow or snow/ice combo can make it turn the tractor around or crab at a serious angle. It's really helpful to offset the blade to counteract this. If the blade is angled with the right forward and the left back it would normally turn the tractor to the left in deep snow. So I offset the blade slightly to the right and it mostly goes straight. (Left and right as viewed from the back.)

I really like the ability to offset the blade not only for snow but also because I can keep the tractor in the traveled portion of a road and still scrape the sides of the road and pull back gravel, cut out ruts etc. The offset is almost a must for cleaning a ditch out as well.

For ordinary situations, you want to be able to cover the wheel tracks with the blade angled. You also want to be able to spin the blade backwards without hitting the tires or doing odd gymnastics. As a practical matter, that limits the width of the blade to some extent although wider blades usually also have a deeper reach from the 3PH which helps some.

If you use a blade for dirt/gravel then weight is your friend. There's no down pressure on the 3ph so it's the weight of the blade and the curve of the moldboard/cutting edge to keep it from chattering and leaving a rough surface. You can do a rough comparison by looking at the weight of the blade and divide by the width so you get pounds/foot of blade. Normally, a wider blade also has more pounds/foot because the extra stress requires more steel not only on the blade but also the rest of the assembly. Too much weight in snow isn't good as you can tear up asphalt or concrete, cut through snow and into gravel etc. unless you are really careful or use a soft cutting edge. There's a whole discussion on here somewhere about rubber edges vs. cutting PVC pipes for use in snow so I won't repeat all that.

Treefarmer
 

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i have been trying to figure out ways of adding weight to the front. I don't believe the front tires have rim guard so that is an option, can't seem to find any wheel weights that are actually heavy and the front weight bracket is said to interfere with the loader




I would think as long as you had enough front ballast, an 8 footer would be fine on a 4 series. The 7 footer I have is a beast and the 2032R stays the course. “Light” grading? No problem, in my onion.

https://youtu.be/rQpyBhvyAnQ
 

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I would think as long as you had enough front ballast, an 8 footer would be fine on a 4 series.
The 7 footer I have is a beast and the 2032R stays the course. “Light” grading? No problem, in my onion.
My back blade prefers garlic,,,:dunno:


I could not resist,,,
:laugh:

 

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You guys might want to consider trying these. They should help.

EKO 8 & EKO 9 TIRE CHAINS

The EKO 8 has 8 mm chain links and 9 mm studs. The side chain is 8 mm.

The EKO 9 has 9 mm chain links and 10 mm studs. The side chain is 9 mm.

Use these tire chains on machines for snow clearance, agricultural and light forest work.
 

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i would but id be afraid of marking pavement more than the non studded


You guys might want to consider trying these. They should help.

EKO 8 & EKO 9 TIRE CHAINS

The EKO 8 has 8 mm chain links and 9 mm studs. The side chain is 8 mm.

The EKO 9 has 9 mm chain links and 10 mm studs. The side chain is 9 mm.

Use these tire chains on machines for snow clearance, agricultural and light forest work.
 
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