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Discussion Starter #1
The photo's show something on the inside and outside of my rear tires only, oily to the touch? I didn't order any type of fluid for my tires, and have never noticed until today (owned 1 & 1/2 years), no pets in the barn! Tractor has been inside all week, wasn't there before today?
724662
724663
 

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Seems the obvious question is "Are your tires loaded with a liquid?". I'd guess you have loaded tires and they are leaking at the bead. Once you stop moving and park it, whatever is built up in the bead leaks down the sides of the tire.
 

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3046R with 385a, 320R. 2320 with 62D and 54” 3pt blower
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Any drastic weather changes? Just a thought as condensation since it’s only on the bottom. You state there is no fluid in the tires so the only other explanation is aliens.




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Any drastic weather changes? Just a thought as condensation since it’s only on the bottom. You state there is no fluid in the tires so the only other explanation is aliens.

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Sure does look like what it is. Humidity change causing condensation.
 

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Any drastic weather changes? Just a thought as condensation since it’s only on the bottom. You state there is no fluid in the tires so the only other explanation is aliens.
Not to be to picky here but he said he didn't order any fluid for his tires. That doesn't mean they aren't loaded. My dealer loads all the tractors whether you order it or not.
 
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My loaded tractor tires "sweat" like that whenever there's a sudden warm-up. It's due to the temperature differential between the liquid in the tires and the ambient air. My tires usually sweat between the 2:00 and 10:00 o'clock positions which indicates the fill level. Yours seem to indicate that they're likely very low or nearly empty.
 

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My loaded tractor tires "sweat" like that whenever there's a sudden warm-up. It's due to the temperature differential between the liquid in the tires and the ambient air. My tires usually sweat between the 2:00 and 10:00 o'clock positions which indicates the fill level. Yours seem to indicate that they're likely very low or nearly empty.
Same here. It sure looks like the OP's tires have a bit of liquid in them.
 

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I wonder if there’s heat loss or a cold layer of air near the slab?
 

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Looks to me like that is all the fluid that is left in the tire after they were drained and the valve stem was at the bottom of the rim when the tires were drained.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the comments, and replying! I would call the dealer, but I'm guessing it doesn't matter? I was thinking about the composition of my tires, because the wet portion was oily? Since I've only noticed it once during my ownership (bought new) the alien comment, seems most logical:alien:!!
 
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Discussion Starter #11
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Well, everyone was right, my tires are (watered) that was the term the dealer used when I called, I said won't that rust my rims? I was transferred to service, and service used the term (watered) also, again I said won't that rust my inside rims? The service department stated they watered all 3000 series for ballast, and use anti-freeze mixture! I took the fluid to our lab at work, because on the floor the liquid looked like water! Our lab didn't have a way to test for anti-freeze, I was given a container and told to place in the freezer. The liquid I caught came from the valve stem, after placing inside a freezer for 6 hours, it froze solid? Will the freezing hurt my tires in the winter, I've been wondering about the lobe I sometimes feel, guess it's due to the fluid rotating? I never requested fluid, or wheel weights in my tires when the salesman discussed the options, because I was concerned mowing on a hill. I mow in the direction of the incline.
 

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I believe I would drain that. Or at least, drain half of it and add anti-freeze to fill it. Or RV anti-freeze. Or Windshield washer fluid. Those two, I would go 100%. My preference would be RV anti-freeze. You could go Rim-Guard, but it is pricey.

Dave
 

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Id call the dealer back and have them tell me, one way or another, exactly whats in the tires. If they say they dont know, have them go look at the barrel they pump it out of.
You should NOT just add to it without know whats in there.
And yes, some compounds used for weight will most certainly rust the wheels, which is just one more reason Id personally insist on knowing exactly what it is thats in the tire.
 

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I would take precaution that it will not rust the inside of the rims, otherwise you will pay for it later. I bought a 1996 855 last year and found that the tires were all filled with calcium chloride liquid. I had all the tires dismounted, had the rims sandblasted and powder coated. I haven't had the tires filled yet.
 

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You need to know. If it’s calcium chloride, it has to cover the whole rim. If air gets to the metal, it will rust very quickly. Give them a call.
 
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That looks like the stuff the dealer, who was supposed to install Rim Guard, installed in my tires.
I told them "Do not use calcium chloride in my wheels" and they told me they would not, I offered to do it myself with Rim Gaurd, they said they'd take care of it..

Does it have a lemon or orange -ish scent ?
Mine were filled with a product called Citrastar 50
(I attached the msds)

It is calcium chloride with a citrus scent and a rust inhibitor..the claim is that it will not damage rims.

Plain old calcium chloride, kept at a level where the rim is always completely covered, is not supposed to hurt either... the problems arise when the wheel isn't covered and oxygen is allowed to touch the rim in combination with the calcium chloride water mixture.
 

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