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Discussion Starter #1
I'm finding that I need both my front blade and my snow blower for cleaning up after a storm. The changeout from one to the other is not bad at all except for the hydraulic lines. Each time you have to route or unroute the snow blower's lines for the chute, carefully tying them down to keep them out of the front right tire. And after you've installed the snow blower, you have the lines for the front quick hitch angling just dangling around in space, needing to be secured.

I'm looking at installing 2 hydraulic quick connects (female) on the quick hitch to be used by the snow blower chute lines. My thought was to simply put a T fitting where each line goes into the quick hitch angling cylinder and add the quick connect to the T. When the snow blower is in use, the pin on the quick hitch prevents the angling cylinder from moving. So no fluid would go into or out of that cylinder. With the T in place, instead the fluid would move the chute cylinder on the snow blower. This configuration would eliminate 2 lines from going back to the SCV ports and eliminate the dangling lines from the quick hitch angling cylinder.

Please comment if I'm doing something silly here. I know a lot of you know more about hydraulics than I do. Also, if you can recommend a source for the parts I'll need I'd be grateful.

A diagram of my proposal is attached, along with a picture of the connections to the front quick hitch angling cylinder. It looks to me like there's enough room to add the T's and quick connects.

When I complete this project, assuming it's a go, I'll post pictures of the final configuration and a parts list.

Thanks,

Keane
 

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I also hated changing between a blade & snow blower.

I do not believe what you are planning will last very long, because of ice build up.
You will end up breaking off the fittings. I have broken off the standard fittings when plowing alot of snow when it is very cold. The snow starts packing in around the angle cylinder & freezes. It finally builds up to break off a fitting.

Something I had thought about doing but never got to, before upgrading to a larger tractor was to make up 2 hydraulic hoses with male quick connects on one end & female quick connects on the other. The hoses would be long enough to run from the SCV quick connects, to the front quick hitch. Then the hoses for the angle & chute functions would be connected to the hoses at the quick hitch instead of having to lace & unlace the chute hoses back to the SCV quick connects.
 

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I also agree with Chris that putting the Tee's and QD's there would be a bad idea, a lot of snow builds up in that area as he stated.
Your idea has merit though, you just need to place the Tee's inline and away from that area. So you'd be looking at getting six 1/4" hoses made, two proper machined Tee's (not from the Home Cheapot plumbing isle) and two female QD's.
I also like the idea of four new hoses to "extend" the mid-SCV QD's to the front and have them secured there, then having short hoses made for the blower and blade to plug into them

Do you have a local hydraulic shop you can deal with? Buying custom hoses online can be tricky unless you confident about different fitting type and sizes, Brian at Fitrite or even myself could supply them, but again if you guess wrong on the details then you waste time, hoses, and shipping fees.
 

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I've been thinking about the same thing. I'm looking at a $100 two way valve from Northern, and new hoses of the correct length. I would mount the valve on the side of the quick hitch. In effect, this moves the connections for the blade angle and the chute angle from the front of the floorboard to the side of the quick hitch, which is much more accessible. The new blade angle hoses would remain connected all winter. The new, shorter chute hoses would be the only connect/disconnect point when switching between the blade and blower. Just switch the valve at the same time as inserting or removing the pivot pin and switching attachments. I need to find a local shop to make the new hoses with the right fittings. I'll post pictures if I do it anytime soon, but it may have to wait until spring.
:greentractorride:
 

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WTH, you just described a "Manual Diverter" valve.
 

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Yes Kenny - item 2071 at Northern. Your ultimate diverter valve kit got me thinking about how to do this. :thumbup1gif: Since there is no need to switch on the fly, it doesn't need to be automatic in this case. Maybe you could come up with a kit with the valve and correct length hoses to do this. I would certainly buy it rather than cobbling it together myself. :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the great ideas

Thanks to everyone for the great feedback on the original concept. I haven't seen a lot of ice in that area, but this is my first winter with the snow blower. I've already noted how a lot of the tractor gets coated with chute spray. I can see stuff breaking as you try to raise the snow blower. I know there was another thread talking about heat from the exhaust affecting melting and freezing in that area.

The manual diverter looks like a great solution and gives flexibility for use with other implements. For my limited needs, I don't need the switch. It does make for a nice, clean install. In my limited use, when the quick hitch angling cylinder is pinned in place, that circuit is essentially closed.

Based on KennyD's suggestion, I think I'll take my existing hoses to a local hydraulics shop and have them add tees and a quick connect to both of them about 1 foot from the cylinder end (I'll mark the exact points, since the lengths are different.) I'll just tie them to the top bar and they'll be out of the way. Not very pretty, but I think it will do the job. If they are not rigidly mounted, they'll be harder to break.

Keane
 

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Good plan Keane, but be forewarned a local shop may not "add" anything to your hoses, most wont mix-match different brand fittings and hoses due to very specific crimp specifications required-and it's just becomes a liability for them. Taking your marked-up hoses with you is a great idea however so they can match what you have.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Reconfig of Snow Blower hydraulics Completed -- Pics attached

I finally completed the change I proposed in the first post. Thanks again to ChrisR, Kennyd, and others who offered suggestions that influenced the final design.

Kennyd was right: It was not possible to add T's to my existing lines. The project required building all new lines with the T's. Thanks to the guys at DXP Rocky Mountain Supply in Greeley for a superb job of building the lines to my specs. Total cost was about $200. Using my old lines, I decided where the T's should go and I marked each line with a piece of white tape. I took the old lines with me and this was sufficient for building the new ones.

$200 was more that I planned to spend, but as many of you know it is very hard to say "no" to your tractor. And I was, as usual, struggling to decide what to get my wife for Christmas. All problems solved!

I placed the T's on the right side of the quick hitch. Although the vertical lift cylinder is there, I wanted to stay away from the drive shaft on the left side. I ended up with the lines from the snow blower chute hydraulic going around either side of the lift cylinder to get to their respective T. I put right angle connectors on each of these lines. They are each too long, but now that I know how much custom hydraulic lines cost I think I can live with this.

The metal fittings of one T rests on the metal edge of the quick hitch. I know that this will eventually rub off paint, so I looked for the right rubber hose to put over it. Not finding anything that would work, I ended up wrapping it in several layers of electrical tape.

I tested the whole thing late this afternoon. I tried the blade and snow blower at all maximum positions to make sure the lines dressed properly and didn't bind on anything. Everything worked pretty much as expected. There's a little more hydrostatic fluid on the driveway where I didn't tighten one fitting enough. When activating the chute, I was surprised to see the snow blower move a little from the angling cylinder on the quick hitch. The locking pin and the pivot point bolt on the quick hitch are both extremely tight. I have to hit the pin with a rubber mallet to get it to seat all the way. This momentary movement is simply a tradeoff for not spending $100 on a diverter. It does not appear to cause any problems with operation.

Sorry that a couple of the pics are a little fuzzy.

Thanks again for everyone's help.

Keane
 

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Great follow up Keane, thanks :good2:
 

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So here is the overkill diverter valve version. Diverter valve, six new hoses, and a bunch of fittings and quick connects. All but two of the hose ends are ¼ inch ORFS, with the two on the angle cylinder being ¼ inch JIC flare. I reused the existing quick connects, since they were all ORFS. To switch from plow to blower requires connecting the two chute hoses, installing the pivot pin, connecting the delco connector for the linear actuator on the chute, and switching the diverter valve. Much easier than running the blower hoses back to the SCV.
First picture is the layout of the parts, second is assembled diverter valve, third is the finished job.
 

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So here is the overkill diverter valve version. Diverter valve, six new hoses, and a bunch of fittings and quick connects. All but two of the hose ends are ¼ inch ORFS, with the two on the angle cylinder being ¼ inch JIC flare. I reused the existing quick connects, since they were all ORFS. To switch from plow to blower requires connecting the two chute hoses, installing the pivot pin, connecting the delco connector for the linear actuator on the chute, and switching the diverter valve. Much easier than running the blower hoses back to the SCV.
First picture is the layout of the parts, second is assembled diverter valve, third is the finished job.
Shouldn't that be a factory option for the front quick-hitch? :thumbup1gif:


Mr. Moose
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Now that I've had a chance to try this......

Real life use has brought some insight into the limitations of my reconfiguration of the front hydraulics on my 1025R. There are 2 major drawbacks with the approach that I took:

1) It is difficult to successfully mate the quick connects at the tees because they move. The 40 mph horizontal snow, my frozen hands, and my fogged-over goggles are also part of the problem. But even in ideal conditions, you want the receiving end of a quick connect firmly mounted to something. Otherwise, when you try to push the mating connector into it, it moves instead of clicking. And it thinks it's funny.

2) When I turn the snow blower chute, the snow blower moves slightly from the pressure on the quick hitch angling cylinder. The pin is in place in the quick hitch, and it's tight. I have to put it in with a rubber mallet. But the hydraulic cylinder is strong enough to move the blower even with the pin in. I worry that this is not good for the drive shaft, which is going at full speed at the time.


WTH18359, while concerned that he over-killed the project, has the better solution. Neither of these major drawbacks exist in his solution with the diverter valve, I believe.

To fix my movement problem, I plan to add 2 on/off valves between the tees and the angling cylinder. (Please see red X's on the attached diagram.) This will allow me to completely shut off the angling cylinder circuit when the snow blower chute is being used. If anybody knows where I might get these valves, please let me know. The lines are 1/4". The valves I need would have to be female on one end (for the tee connection) and male on the other (for the hose connection.) Of course, they would also be rated for the pressure.

In the end, I will probably have spent as much on tees and on/off valves as I would have spent on a diverter.

Keane
 

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This is what I did to mine
Did the same thing to my previous X595 for the same reasons as you

I ran two new hoses from the quick couplers under the deck / cab
to the quick couplers at the front hitch

Now I have two short hoses from the plow angle and
two short hoses from the chute rotator.

Never a problem for the 10 years I had the X595
 

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To fix my movement problem, I plan to add 2 on/off valves between the tees and the angling cylinder. (Please see red X's on the attached diagram.) This will allow me to completely shut off the angling cylinder circuit when the snow blower chute is being used. If anybody knows where I might get these valves, please let me know. The lines are 1/4". The valves I need would have to be female on one end (for the tee connection) and male on the other (for the hose connection.) Of course, they would also be rated for the pressure.

In the end, I will probably have spent as much on tees and on/off valves as I would have spent on a diverter.

Keane
My supplier sells, 2000psi rated, 1/4" (female both sides) ball valves, but they are about $30 each. The 3000psi ones don't come smaller than 1/2" and are $60+ each.
 

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This is what I did to mine
Did the same thing to my previous X595 for the same reasons as you

I ran two new hoses from the quick couplers under the deck / cab
to the quick couplers at the front hitch

Now I have two short hoses from the plow angle and
two short hoses from the chute rotator.

Never a problem for the 10 years I had the X595

That looks like a great solution! :bigthumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I like dzklanz' solution. I was trying to avoid having loose hydraulic lines on the quick hitch floating around when the snow blower was installed. I can't switch to this approach now because I'd need new lengths of hydraulic lines again, which are pretty pricey.

I need to do some research about the maximum working pressure in these lines. My hoses have 3200 psi marked on them, but that may be more than necessary. If anybody knows off the top of their head, please let me know.
 

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Your system is rated for +/- 2000 PSI, but pressure spikes can easily be double-like when you hit something solid.
 

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I only have my lines made that are rated 5000 PSI
PARKER. I use the rubber coupler caps
To contain the loose hose ends. Yes getting hoses
made may be expensive. Depends on how long you plan
On keeping your tractor.
 

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I like dzklanz' solution. I was trying to avoid having loose hydraulic lines on the quick hitch floating around when the snow blower was installed. I can't switch to this approach now because I'd need new lengths of hydraulic lines again, which are pretty pricey.

I need to do some research about the maximum working pressure in these lines. My hoses have 3200 psi marked on them, but that may be more than necessary. If anybody knows off the top of their head, please let me know.

If you can FIND a shop willing ,you don't have to have new lines made. (if they are long enough)
You need only cut your existing hoses and have ends crimped on.
A couple of female quick couplers & snap rings, bracket for the quick couplers, 4 male quick couplers
 
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