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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My family dabbles in livestock. We have had pigs, chickens, goats, and sheep. We mainly raise them for our own consumption, but lately have been growing pigs out for others. Also, my younger kids will be getting into 4-H in the next couple years. Right now, we have all our animals at my Grandpas farm. My Dad had a 100 cow dairy and my uncle had a 500 pig operation there, both now retired. There is plenty of space, but bottom line, it's not mine. It's time to build on our own property. My wife and I have been discussing plans for years now, and what started out as a small lawn shed style for pigs, has grown to a 24x40 barn, 11 ft high. Funny, 24x40 isn't even big.

Fundamentally, we wanted to be budget conscious - this is a recreational barn after all. Secondly, it's important for us (my wife and I) to build it ourselves, thus the width and height size. We will learn along the way, and bragging rights!

No need to spin up the material pricing jokes, or criticizing the timing - it's green lights and full throttle.

A lot of the material is ordered, and now waiting on it to arrive. Until then, there is plenty to do. I will provide updated posts and photos when I can.
 

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I've helped on many building projects. I own my own tools. Kind of a jack of all trades, master of none.
I did a fair job of documenting my 50x100 shop we've been working on for a little over 2 years. I think a number of people here would say nose through the thread and get an idea of how it goes for the average guy. I'm not sure if it's better reading for don't do what I did or do what I did...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
MDrew - I have checked in on that thread several times at this point. There's some good information in it. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Whenever there is a big project, there can be tough hurdles to get over or at least some unknowns that one anticipates. There are also critical objectives, that may not be difficult, but must be completed as perfect as possible, as it is a dependency and a critical anchor throughout the project (i.e. squaring the building).

One of my immediate hurdles is getting the material home, specifically the posts. The posts just came in and I have my trailer hooked up and ready to get them this evening. My largest means of transport is a 14 ft 12k dump trailer. Since it's a dump, not a flat-top, I can't just have the forklift drop the material down and strap it down. Likely the posts will moved manually on the dump trailer, then strapped down, understanding the ends will be hanging off the back with the orange flag. Better bring my muscles. The heaviest posts weigh about 175 lbs a piece. Luckily Menards is only about 20 minutes away, and no interstates. I will check out the situation and report back. Hopefully I get the posts home! If it doesn't work out loading it, I will just pay to have it delivered.

As for this thread, I will take some time to post the design, and note some next steps with photos. Essentially add some context, lol.
 
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@Boar I picked up a 20’ culvert pipe from Menards with my 14’ utility trailer. I had them stack empty pallets on the floor to make a false floor above the side rails then placed the pipe pallet on top of those with the ends hanging over each end of the trailer. Easy to unload at home with my forks. I use the same technique when hauling round bales on my utility trailer with side rails too. I place some pallets down the center so they’re close to be level with the sides and then put bales on two wide all the way down the length of the trailer.
Something like that might be an idea for your long posts and makes them easier to unload at home with your tractor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That's an interesting idea. Yeah, it would make picking them up with the forks much easier. Unfortunately, my dump trailer is too deep for that idea. When I get the trailer loaded, I will take a photo - if I remember. I seem to always forget to stop and take a photo.

Also, just for transparency, I am building a 24x48. Not 24x40, like I originally posted. I am glad I am getting all the number issues out of my system on this thread, before I begin building, lol. Geez!
 

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Am also going to follow along with interest.

As far as the craziness right now with prices and availability - it is what it is.

We just had our roof done plus all the soffit and fascia replaced with vinyl. Expensive? Yes. But we are finally at the point of being able to get some major work done on our house and are moving onward with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The price of material made the choice difficult. There is no indication that the prices will be going down this year and unlikely down anything significant next year. Whole different thread on reasons, projections, etc. The point is we needed to make a move sooner rather than later, so here I am.

As for the plans, I used Menards. That's where I typically buy my material, so it made sense to just use their app, which I have to say, is really nice.

Here are the plans I am working towards. As of now, most of all the framing material is purchased. Posts, girts, quikrete, footing pads, etc.

788756


The 11 ft wide opening will be facing the north. Side B will be facing the road. I purposefully didn't include opening on the west, as it's really windy here, and it mostly comes from the west. Not a big deal in the summer, but in the winter, openings can bring in snow drifts. In a nutshell, I fussed for a long time over openings in this barn.

As I gather material, I will shortly begin phase 1.
Rip topsoil away (was going to do that tonight, but it rained)
Stake, square to the road, and square the corners
Dig holes and set posts (4 ft deep, on concrete pad, anchors, and a 80 lb bag on quickrete for more rigidity.
Determine grade board and install - install girts
Install "water conduit" and valve box
Put down base stone and pack
Pour concrete

Once concrete is poured I will have an easier time heading into phase 2 which is trusses and metal.
 

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Good luck with the project! I am currently building a 40x40x14 shop right now. Just got rafters up 2 days ago and windows and doors all framed in yesterday. That's awesome you and your wife are doing it! I have a contractor buddy that is building the post frame and tinning it. I will take over from there to finish everything else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yesterday, I went to Menards to get my material. This was a big haul. I was receiving all the 6x6s, the concrete footing pads, 2x8s and 2x4s of various sizes. I knew this was going to be a tricky load, in fact, I was getting some anx over it. The weight was going to be fine for the trailer and the truck, but I was concerned about the material hanging over the edge. My plan was to strap it down, put more weight at the front of the trailer to counter, place the red flag at the end and drive slow. Worst case, I would just remove it, and have them deliver it.

While I got everything back with no issues, in retrospect, I should of just had them deliver it. The farther I drove away from Menards the more unhappy I got with my load. There was too much weight on the back of the trailer which raised the tongue and put upward force on the hitch. The ride of the rig was terrible. I started to get trailer sway at 30 mph. Not cool. When I got home, I had originally planned on unhooking the trailer and unloading it the next day, but I was worried the trailer would pop off (if I could even get the hitch lock undone) causing the whole front of the trailer to flip upward. I unloaded it last night. Long afternoon and evening, and didn't get dinner until 9:30.

When posting a project build on a forum like this, I feel it's about posting the bad with the good. People learn from these things - I do, it's just entertainment for others I guess. Last night I pushed the limits of what I could transport. I didn't have issues, but that's not the point. I got away with a shortcut. When I finally got home, I looked over the load once more without the urgency of Menards operators, other customers waiting on me, and hungry family. I admit, I scolded myself.

I struggled posting this shameful photo, possibly deteriorating other's judgement of me, but it's a project post. I said I was going to post photos. Here's the ugly.

This is NOT how you load a trailer! Top speed - 25 mph. Straps and flags have been removed.

788863
 

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2 or 3 stacks of empty pallets 5 or 6 high inside the trailer to get you up higher than the front and rear walls would have allowed you to load the posts more centered over the trailer and kept your tongue weight correct. The load being up higher is safer than having it too far rearward taking weight off the tongue. Something to consider if you’re picking up your own sheet metal in long lengths, trusses or need more posts.
 

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I've followed Boars other posts and he's pretty sharp! He'll listen to advise & suggestions and then say why or why not use them. As sharp as he is, he also makes mistakes, as we ALL do, and he's not afraid to post them, as the above post. Follow this to the end and you'll probably learn something! I truly have the utmost respect for him. Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks rwmeyer. I post on GTT, because I learn. Not only from other threads, but build posts like these, which I attempt to maintain. I am not a professional builder by any means. In fact, I work in IT....at a desk....all day. Once I get off work I am outside. My property I develop, the projects I do, the animals I have, are for recreation and family/self building - which may be odd for many people, especially these days, but it's what we do. One the finest attributes about GTT is it's humbleness. Rarely, do I read a thread where it's flame-city.

MTB - I think I am going to try that idea when I pick up the trusses, metal and/or the trim.

I am debating on building the trusses or buying them. Outside of the labor, what are the pros or cons either way? I would think the manufactured ones would be straighter - which may not be the case. I have built trusses before on lawn shed. Once the cuts and angles are figured out, it's not too bad to put them together.

Yes, now it just has to dry up to rototill about 4 inches of dirt back. I pull the dirt back by rototilling about 4-5 inches down, then using the bucket to scoop the loose soil off. Tried and true practice for me so far.

Today, I plan on cutting stakes, building batter boards, and obsessing over the measurements, triple-checking the location with the wife. Speaking of the wife, she insists on taking a more active role in this project. Instead of being an assistant (hold this, do that, carry this), she wants to have ownership in the construction. I think this is fine, however, it does introduce a different dynamic to what I am used to. We'll see how this goes. So far, it's been great. She has taken care of the material purchase, checklists, orders, finances, rebates, building permit, and has been a sounding board for me. She keeps using the quote, "if you can build together, you will stay together". It's been her motto lately. I appreciate the enthusiasm, but we haven't put posts in yet, lol. She did get her eyes opened as we moved 6x6s last night. At ~175 lbs a piece they aren't a joke to move. I guess I share the optimism too, but more analytical methodical way - and cautious to show it. It's a long road ahead.
 
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