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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
I got the 24' 35 psf trusses ordered, the purlins, and wind braces. This time I had then delivered. At $110 for delivery I will have them do it. For me, I would have to make two 60 min round trips to do it with the trailer I have, and as discussed in the thread before, I would of had to rig up something to get them. MDrew, you were in my mind, man! Again, thanks for the idea about the pallets.

I noticed I didn't include a picture of the 3 pt post hole digger with the 18 inch auger. It is GTT after all, right!? Worked great! I love that 4044M.

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Oh separate related topic, I got my first stop-by on Tuesday. A couple guys stopped by and asked if we would construct their pole barn, as they are having difficulties finding someone to build theirs. I declined, but I really thought that was funny. I chuckled to myself a few times - they have no idea this is my first pole barn build, and about this thread, lol! Apparently they didn't want to wait for some contractor to build theirs (construction is in full throttle around here), and they thought every quote they received was too expensive.
 

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Yesterday, I went to Menards to get my material. This was a big haul. I was receiving all the 6x6s, the concrete footing pads, 2x8s and 2x4s of various sizes. I knew this was going to be a tricky load, in fact, I was getting some anx over it. The weight was going to be fine for the trailer and the truck, but I was concerned about the material hanging over the edge. My plan was to strap it down, put more weight at the front of the trailer to counter, place the red flag at the end and drive slow. Worst case, I would just remove it, and have them deliver it.

While I got everything back with no issues, in retrospect, I should of just had them deliver it. The farther I drove away from Menards the more unhappy I got with my load. There was too much weight on the back of the trailer which raised the tongue and put upward force on the hitch. The ride of the rig was terrible. I started to get trailer sway at 30 mph. Not cool. When I got home, I had originally planned on unhooking the trailer and unloading it the next day, but I was worried the trailer would pop off (if I could even get the hitch lock undone) causing the whole front of the trailer to flip upward. I unloaded it last night. Long afternoon and evening, and didn't get dinner until 9:30.

When posting a project build on a forum like this, I feel it's about posting the bad with the good. People learn from these things - I do, it's just entertainment for others I guess. Last night I pushed the limits of what I could transport. I didn't have issues, but that's not the point. I got away with a shortcut. When I finally got home, I looked over the load once more without the urgency of Menards operators, other customers waiting on me, and hungry family. I admit, I scolded myself.

I struggled posting this shameful photo, possibly deteriorating other's judgement of me, but it's a project post. I said I was going to post photos. Here's the ugly.

This is NOT how you load a trailer! Top speed - 25 mph. Straps and flags have been removed.

View attachment 788863
That looks like a short trailer. How long is it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Not 14 ft like I thought. I checked and it's a bit over 12 ft. SMH. That day was a learning day. In retrospect, I was lucky.
 
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Not 14 ft like I thought. I checked and it's a bit over 12 ft. SMH. That day was a learning day. In retrospect, I was lucky.
I have a car hauler to move my tractors that has at 18 foot bed that works well for loads like yours. I use that trailer for everything.
 
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Oh separate related topic, I got my first stop-by on Tuesday. A couple guys stopped by and asked if we would construct their pole barn, as they are having difficulties finding someone to build theirs. I declined, but I really thought that was funny. I chuckled to myself a few times - they have no idea this is my first pole barn build, and about this thread, lol! Apparently they didn't want to wait for some contractor to build theirs (construction is in full throttle around here), and they thought every quote they received was too expensive.
tell those guys to show up every work day and you will train them for free ....so they can build their own for cheap ......LOL
 

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tell those guys to show up every work day and you will train them for free ....so they can build their own for cheap ......LOL
That's a good idea. I think I'm gonna start weed whacker training. (y) :ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Poles are up! I did run out of 2x4s for bracing, so I will head out and get some more. I need 12. No biggie. My plan is to get those today. After the wind/rain/storms we had last week two poles need slightly adjusted. I anticipate those should be easy to do so.

Here's what I got so far.

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Let''s talk audibles and gaps.

Audible 1:
I bought the plans from Menards. The plans don't actually call for a header board. They just notch out the 6x6 posts and rest the truss right on the post. That's great if every one of the posts were lined up exactly, but in my case, with the 18 inch auger, they don't. The posts may be a few inches off on a couple from the post across the building. Also with the modified plans, they may not be a post across the building to the truss. Also I would like to square up the building as much as possible before I being installing the trusses. I think I am going to resolve all this by simply installing a header board around the top. The plans don't call for this, but it will allow me to square the top of the posts, and square the trusses better. It adds some expense, but I think it should be done. I am thinking notch the posts and install piggybacked dual 2x8s. I am interested on feedback on this approach.

Immediate plan of attack:
Today, I am going to further brace the building with 2x4s, like I mentioned earlier, and fix the two poles. I plan on using the left over water in the IBC and wet some of recent pole bases, and further pack them down with more dirt. I then want to mark the intended location of the grade board. Likely just above the current line of top soil, leveled of course. After the grade board, header and girts!

Gaps I have in my head, I would appreciate feedback on:
a. I intend on having concrete in the building and I think I am going to install that sooner than later. Once I get the trusses up, I plan on pouring concrete. I am debating hiring a crew, or collecting some people to help. My uncle who has poured a lot of concrete said he could help. I understand the installing of concrete is important, and needs to be done right, but I want to be able to do it myself. There's no drains, or really anything that would make it complex, so I am leaning towards working with my uncle, and having 4-5 other guys to help, and LOT of preparation.

b. I plan on installing 4 inches of concrete. Rebar, or mesh, or none. Like I said before, this concrete will have some animals in it, equipment, and a 4044M on it. My uncle says rebar or mesh. What are everyone else's thoughts?

c. I would like to install water in the barn, and the consensus seems to be frost-proof hydrant. Any suggestions on type, installation tips, or location in the barn. I was thinking corner. My water guy said install it before the concrete, which I agree with. My uncle suggested a large tile for a form, pour the concrete around it, and fill it with stone, so water leaks, drips, etc, just go down in the stone. Besides, the hard water I have will rot that hydrant in about 10-15 years anyway.
 
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I like the idea of the header. This would give you an even/level starting point to support the trusses and allow you to keep the trusses parallel to each other. That's not too critical if you're using boards for sheathing, but it runs into issues when using 4'x8' sheets... kinda tuff when a sheet hangs over an inch and nothing to attach the next sheet to! Everything being as square as you an get it in the beginning is a good start, as any minor errors tend to get larger as you go.

Gaps:
a. I'm far from any type of concrete specialist or Engineer, so these are just my thoughts. Get your Uncle involved right from the beginning, the planning stage. First is soil prep. I'd think (??) 1" stone COMPACTED as a base. You mentioned water, so where is this going to enter the building? I'd bring it in under the floor. Lay down 2" pvc coming into tile (see c. below). The actual pipe holding the water could be 1" plastic well pipe. If it should leak in the future, simply pull well pipe and replace. And then power. That can be brought in from the outside, but why not pvc conduit now?

b. 2" is fine for a sidewalk and 4" is fine for a garage floor, but I'd go with 6"... if it'll fit into the budget. Yes, your bare tractor is about the same weight as a car/truck, but add implements and it adds up. I would definitely go with rebar, probably no. 4 (1/2"). And don't forget "chairs" of the correct height for the thickness of the floor! I believe the theory is these support the rebar near the bottom of the slab. If the concrete tries to bend, it bens around the rebar, putting any concrete above the rebar in compression...this is good!

c. Frost proof hydrants typically don't drip, but they always drain and rot with time! The actual water shut of valve is at the bottom of the hydrant. Closing the valve stops water from coming in below the frost line and also opens a drain hole so that any water from the valve (3' down?) doesn't freeze. Id use tile about 4' down, but dig the hole deeper (2' ?) and fill with stone for drainage.

As I said, just my thoughts & ideas for you to mull over. As I alsoo said in the beginning of your post, I've followed your work, and it'll be right! Bob
 
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might be just me but i have never heard of squaring/plumbing a building after the poles were set

far as rim boards at top i suggest something like attached picture Below (shows a door opening but you will get the idea)

concrete.......concrete is only as good as its base.....4" will be fine if you have a good loadbearing compacted DRY base ....6" may not be enough if you have a lot of water under your slab ......same with rebar/mesh....its all about your base ...good base mesh...poor base rebar ..the poorer the more you need ..

a concrete slab is not a learn on the job process ....you have a very limited time to get it right and no do overs...and is very heavy taxing work...

you did not mention expansion joints for the concrete (it will need some) (consult your uncle on this)

i would follow your uncles suggestions on the water hydrant

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
rwmeyer: I agree with the header board. Thank you for the feedback on the concrete/water. Yes, I need to do some more research. I have two really good resources I need to talk to yet. One guy works for a concrete company, and the other used to pour basements for a living. I will further close the gaps. Rebar seems to be preferred choice, so likely I will go with that. I will continue to close the gaps. Once I get the grade board around, and the girts up, I am going to begin having more specific conversations on the water and concrete, and it will evolve from conceptual to practical.

ttazzman: The poles are 18-20 ft high. We squared and lined them as best we could, but posts are rarely perfectly straight. Since they are only 4 ft in the ground and the concrete has entirely cured, moving them a couple inches isn't a problem. Putting a header board around allows me to make final tweaks, is what I meant.

That's a good idea on the rim boards.

You are right, I didn't mention expansion. I have three rolls of expansion foam, I will line the entire interior with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
It's starting to take shape. Grade board on (except on piece), and girts are about half way up. Later today, I will be heading to the hardware to get more material. Last grade board, header boards for the doors, and the rim or outside header boards.

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