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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently rented a box truck for work and when I picked it up was totally surprised that it was literally brand new. 128 miles on the odometer, not a scratch anywhere and even new truck smell.

I used it for delivery all one day and headed back to a hotel I got off the interstate to miss some construction delay and suddenly the engine raced and the speed slowed down. I'm not used to tier 4 issues and my first thought was the transmission had crapped out. Then it hit me that it was probably regeneration even though I had run the truck pretty hard since this was in mountainous country (eastern mountains, not anything like the Rockies) and the truck was was governed so that on an uphill grade it would lose speed even when empty. I was surprised as I thought regeneration was mostly when the truck hadn't been run at speed.

It did it one more time in 420 miles over two days. I guess it's not a new truck anymore, lol.

Treefarmer
 

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Curious what brand/type of truck it was? That was one area where it seemed emissions regen had become sort of unnoticeable. I know on my Duramax and Cummins it was mostly noticeable from a MPG drop... It sounds like a step backwards. That’s why I was wondering what you rented?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Curious what brand/type of truck it was? That was one area where it seemed emissions regen had become sort of unnoticeable. I know on my Duramax and Cummins it was mostly noticeable from a MPG drop... It sounds like a step backwards. That’s why I was wondering what you rented?
Honestly I didn't look at the truck brand. It was from Penske. I meant to look at both the truck and engine but was just too tired when I got back to the hotel at night and when I dropped it back at the terminal, I had to transfer stuff back to my pickiup.

It may not have been regen but nothing bad showed on the gauges and the truck drove fine both before and after the two episodes.

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I work for Penske and transport trucks for them. Yesterday I was in a new Freightliner 26 foot box truck with 235 miles and later in a International Box truck with 325 miles, both had Cummins engines. when in regen there should be a light lite on dash. Penske is getting all new trucks at all locations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I work for Penske and transport trucks for them. Yesterday I was in a new Freightliner 26 foot box truck with 235 miles and later in a International Box truck with 325 miles, both had Cummins engines. when in regen there should be a light lite on dash. Penske is getting all new trucks at all locations.
I didn't see the light but won't swear it wasn't one lit. The errrr, roads I was on didn't allow much time to scan the dash. I did look for bright flashing ones like oil, overheat etc.

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I work for Penske and transport trucks for them. Yesterday I was in a new Freightliner 26 foot box truck with 235 miles and later in a International Box truck with 325 miles, both had Cummins engines. when in regen there should be a light lite on dash. Penske is getting all new trucks at all locations.
I work for International and am very familiar with the after treatment both with our past and present engines, as well as the Cummins power plants. If the truck is in a regen, or just came out of one, the “regen light” (a “hot exhaust” lamp) will illuminate at very low speeds only to inform you that the DOC/DPF is hot so you don’t park over brush or crawl under the truck for some reason and get burned.

For the OP, it is very likely the truck started a regen and it felt sluggish because the “throttle” plate clamps off to increase engine load to build more heat in the exhaust to start a passive regen. Also, if any of these modern engines are run at engine loads of about 70% or higher, a regen will not occur until the load goes down.

Also, depending on how the ECM parameters were set up, the fleet owner may have limited power in certain gears or RPM levels to preserve power train components. That can be done in most medium duty and higher engines, regardless of brand and possibly in the smaller diesels as well.
 
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