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Just some thought here on if I should remove the battery in my Z710A. I still have the original factory John Deere battery in the Z710A. I've never removed it during the winters the past 4 years. Due it's age.. I think it may be subject to winter stress for the age, and safe to remove it and store it in a warner area of the home.

Wouldn't hurt I suppose.!
 

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Our Z950R is brand new, but I still removed it and put it on a tender for the time being. I’ve started it once already.
 

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Just some thought here on if I should remove the battery in my Z710A. I still have the original factory John Deere battery in the Z710A. I've never removed it during the winters the past 4 years. Due it's age.. I think it may be subject to winter stress for the age, and safe to remove it and store it in a warner area of the home.

Wouldn't hurt I suppose.!
Depends on how cold your mowers storage area is. If it goes well below freezing might be worth pulling it out. Keeping it fully charged is a better bet. Batteries actually discharge faster in warm temperatures. Much like a cat you are not always doing the battery a favor by bringing it inside.

Summer heat is what usually damages your battery. Then winter temperature just finishes it off.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Depends on how cold your mowers storage area is. If it goes well below freezing might be worth pulling it out. Keeping it fully charged is a better bet. Batteries actually discharge faster in warm temperatures. Much like a cat you are not always doing the battery a favor by bringing it inside.

Summer heat is what usually damages your battery. Then winter temperature just finishes it off.

Now that is a new twist on something I've never heard about a battery...warmer weather is more damaging. When it's always been that batteries goes bad during the winter.

My 36' x 36' garage is well insulated to the tune it's probably 10 degrees warmer inside than outside during the winter. I have a Diehard #71239 Platinum Maintainer connected to the battery now, and I've heard these maintainers are not always good for older batteries.
 

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I leave the battery in our Z915B. I also start the mower ~ once a month.
 
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Now that is a new twist on something I've never heard about a battery...warmer weather is more damaging. When it's always been that batteries goes bad during the winter.

My 36' x 36' garage is well insulated to the tune it's probably 10 degrees warmer inside than outside during the winter. I have a Diehard #71239 Platinum Maintainer connected to the battery now, and I've heard these maintainers are not always good for older batteries.
I've heard similar information. I think it's safe to say that either extreme (hot/cold) is hard on a battery. Unfortunately we all don't live where it is 70 degrees year round. :) My 2720 battery suffered sudden death towards the end of summer when it was still warm out. I always kept a solar battery tender on it.

My shed is unheated and I leave my X500 in the mower over winter. I do try to run it now and then. Since I don't have electricity in the shed I use a Battery Tender 10W solar maintainer. It works well on the 2720 battery. I should probably just alternate it every week or so between the X500 and 2720.
 
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I leave the battery in our Z915B. I also start the mower ~ once a month.
I do the same. It is important to let the engine warm up each time you start it to evaporate the condensation that forms inside the engine.
 
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Yes summer heat is usually the killer. When the temperature turns cold the battery needs power reserves it no longer can supply. The battery's self discharge rate rises with the temperature.

Leaving the battery in generally doesn't hurt. Unless you have a problem. Like the plastic case cracks from freezing or the charger goes haywire. The plastic case can also be damaged from severe overcharging.

A fully charged battery is less likely to freeze. A discharged/dead battery will freeze easily. I'm taking about the acid inside.

That being said. I normally leave the battery in my tractor. It usually gets used year round weather permitting. (Dry grass growing or snow falling) I put a tender on about once a month if I'm not using it. Once the light is green it is time to come off. This was I don't come back to find any surprises. This is why it's worthwhile buying a good tender that shuts down when done. However it is no guarantee that you will never have a problem.

Now if the battery has a constant draw from like a radio or clock charge it more often. This is usually not a problem with lawn mowers.

Test or maintenance starting is hard on equipment for various reasons. Resist the temptation to start it for no reason. If it's time to put it to work have at it. Otherwise it is better to just let it sit.
 

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The owner's manual for my generator says for long term storage to remove the battery and put it on a maintainer or tender. What's the difference of leaving it installed and on a tender (which is what I do). But to be fair the generator does get run at least once every 60 days.
 

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Went out today and started the Z710A. It cranked about 10 seconds and I stopped. Waited a few seconds to try once more. It started on the third try. It hadn't been started in two months.

This sure put the wear on the starter, and I often thought about removing the factory fuel pump and install a 12 volt electric one. I'm going to get on the Internet and search for a 12 volt one and just may install one for that reason...easy fast starting.

Will keep all of you informed on what I come up with. I'm use to fuel injection as on the automobiles. A lawn tractor should have the same.
 

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Went out today and started the Z710A. It cranked about 10 seconds and I stopped. Waited a few seconds to try once more. It started on the third try. It hadn't been started in two months.

This sure put the wear on the starter, and I often thought about removing the factory fuel pump and install a 12 volt electric one. I'm going to get on the Internet and search for a 12 volt one and just may install one for that reason...easy fast starting.

Will keep all of you informed on what I come up with. I'm use to fuel injection as on the automobiles. A lawn tractor should have the same.
This is why I mentioned leaving it be until you actually need it.

Pull the air filter and give the carb a shot of starting fluid or carb cleaner too prime the engine.

Just remember every time this happens. It's because fuel in the bowl evaporates. Leaving any dirt behind. So you have to crank it over enough to fill the bowl again. Normally the engine runs off what fuel is already in the bowl and the pump just keeps it full. The pulse pumps on small engines work way better when the engine is running vs just cranking over.
All the extra cranking also draws the battery down. The charging system has to run for quite a while to change it back up.

You remove a battery to stop possible damage to whatever it came out of while charging it. Battery's have been known to explode.
Did a damage estimate on a one year old H-D bike with under 3,000 miles. Only had heavy smoke damage but it was a total loss. Apparently the tender on his Ferrari went went China syndrome when no one was home. Also did smoke damage to a Ducati motorcycle he also owned. That one wasn't totaled.
 

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Went out today and started the Z710A. It cranked about 10 seconds and I stopped. Waited a few seconds to try once more. It started on the third try. It hadn't been started in two months.

This sure put the wear on the starter, and I often thought about removing the factory fuel pump and install a 12 volt electric one. I'm going to get on the Internet and search for a 12 volt one and just may install one for that reason...easy fast starting.

Will keep all of you informed on what I come up with. I'm use to fuel injection as on the automobiles. A lawn tractor should have the same.
Many Deere mowers are available with fuel injected engines.
 

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Many Deere mowers are available with fuel injected engines.
Much like the car business. Every lawn mower/tractor engine should have been redesigned from carbs to fuel injection a long time ago.

JD should have also kept the cooling system when they changed to EFI on the X590. Now you have to move up to the X7xx series to get it.
 

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WHAT CAN I SAY?????. I did something that I'm not proud of...and that is leave the ignition key in the on position on my Z710A. Resulting a dead battery. I would guess some would forgive me at my age. 86 years old as of 12/15. It all came about getting the Oil Cooler install on the right side of the engine bay. Having to lean over the right side to get to the area where I was mounting the cooler, my right arm somehow must have moved the key switch to the "on" position. I was successful in installing the oil cooler and batten down the hatches (to finish the install) and failed to make a final check on all parts of the tractor.

All is well though, as I have the Battery Tender hooked up and during a re-charge. I see no reason this key being left on hurt the battery...just a fast discharge that's all. I might wire up a "red indicator light" on the panel to let me know if my 86 year old feable mind somehow needs reminding.
 

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WHAT CAN I SAY?????. I did something that I'm not proud of...and that is leave the ignition key in the on position on my Z710A. Resulting a dead battery. I would guess some would forgive me at my age. 86 years old as of 12/15.
Happy (belated) Birthday.


It all came about getting the Oil Cooler install on the right side of the engine bay. Having to lean over the right side to get to the area where I was mounting the cooler, my right arm somehow must have moved the key switch to the "on" position. I was successful in installing the oil cooler and batten down the hatches (to finish the install) and failed to make a final check on all parts of the tractor.
I left the key on once on my Z445. I was able to slow-charge the battery and bring it back up to par. :thumbup1gif:

All is well though, as I have the Battery Tender hooked up and during a re-charge. I see no reason this key being left on hurt the battery...just a fast discharge that's all. I might wire up a "red indicator light" on the panel to let me know if my 86 year old feeble mind somehow needs reminding.
I'd need a horn. A very loud horn.
 

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I'll bite and add my two cents since I have a procedure I follow every year regarding this.

I'd say a good rule of thumb is if you live in a colder winter climate and will not be running the equipment for >60 days, pull the battery, bring it inside/somewhere that never goes below freezing and put a tender on it.

Up here in Michigan, most folks I know pull boat, PWC, lawn tractor (if winterized) and zero turn batteries over the winter if they are stored in an unheated environment (mine included). It's going to be 0F or colder here this week.:cold:

Even those in temperature maintained storage and left in the hardware are put on tenders - just due to the duration of down time.

Down south, yeah, it makes sense to me if they are left in. The the temps are pretty mild and the down time is pretty short - just charge 'em up good before putting them to bed for the winter.

My poor old strong box sits out in the uninsulated barn waiting for me to turn the key on the 4720, no matter what the season. :snow:

I make sure I work it for at least an hour when ever I fire it up to evaporate sump condensation and put a charge back in the battery. Normally, that's at least once a week. The battery is going 11 years old now. Corrosion on the positive post says its days are numbered. It's outlived many a battery I've owned.

Matt
 
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