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Servicing front axle tried to remove vent plug. It's not allen or torx (metric or SAE ) any idea
This is my first post so hope I did it right
 

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Servicing front axle tried to remove vent plug. It's not allen or torx (metric or SAE ) any idea
This is my first post so hope I did it right
What plug are you trying to remove. Basically, you have to remove the drain plugs in the bottom of both steering knuckles and the fill cap. Not sure what vent plug you are referring to.

Maybe a picture???
 

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What plug are you trying to remove. Basically, you have to remove the drain plugs in the bottom of both steering knuckles and the fill cap. Not sure what vent plug you are referring to.

Maybe a picture???
See below:

Number:
AT211699
Part Price:1.56 USD
On Hand:
0 Check Other Stores
Description:Fitting Plug - PLUG PT1/16
 

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Edited my post.. I was typing the wrong answer as OP was posting more info.

Welcome to the Forum!!!

Mine is a nice tight fit with a 4mm Hex Wrench.
IMG_20191129_140920.jpg
 

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A standard 1/16 pipe plug takes a 5/32 hex (allen wrench) key. Not sure if JD uses standard parts though! Bob
 

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A standard 1/16 pipe plug takes a 5/32 hex (allen wrench) key. Not sure if JD uses standard parts though! Bob
I'm betting it's supposed to be 5/32...

5/32 fit nicely, but the 4mm was a teeny bit tighter.
 

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Yup. 5/32=.1562" and 4mm=.1575", but either should work. Bob
 

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3d, not familiar with the 1025r, but thinking that would be a convenient fill point...small but it'll work! Remove level plug (#19 in diagram) and add oil until it flows out of level plug hole. Bob
 
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Just asking do you really have to remove it for filling. Thanks for the help
No, there is no need to remove this plug. Simply drain the oil from the bottom of each steering knuckle and fill through the fill plug with the dipstick on.

You have to pour the oil in slow when refilling, run it some, recheck it, and top off as needed.
 

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Just asking do you really have to remove it for filling. Thanks for the help
My owners manual says you do...

I read the manual..several sections a bunch of times.. to get familiar with my new tractor, and totally missed the "and vent plug", in the line that says (B).Remove dipstick (A) on the right side of the front axle and vent plug (B)."

Too funny...

(Not disagreein' with Ray_PA... I'm probably not takin' mine out either;) ... just sharing what the manual says)
 

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My owners manual says you do...

I read the manual..several sections a bunch of times.. to get familiar with my new tractor, and totally missed the "and vent plug", in the line that says (B).Remove dipstick (A) on the right side of the front axle and vent plug (B)."

Too funny...
Well, glad you told us. It is a PITA to fill without it. Air going out the same hole oil going in is ludacris. Thought JD was nuts not having a vent to burp the system. No more glugging!!!!

Sent from my SM-N976V using Tapatalk
 

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The vent plugs aren't so much for draining as they are for filling, and they're not for filling oil directly into them. Oil is filled in the dipstick hole and the vents are to allow air to escape the hubs. It takes a while for the oil to seep all the way into the hubs, and it would be much longer if the air couldn't escape the vents, as it would be pushing back against the incoming oil. The slow seeping into the hubs is why the manual says to wait an hour for the oil to settle, but that's with the vent plugs removed.
 

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Vent plugs are there for a reason

I've found that this transmission would not drain completely without removing the plug. And if it's not open when filling, you can keep getting backup and mess at the dipstick opening where the fluid is going in because it won't go in quickly or consistently. They were put there for a reason.

The holes for the tool on the vent plugs fill with crap from mowing, dirt work, and anything else the tractor does. Before I could get any tool in them, I had to use a dental pick and water spray bottle to clean them out. This would be a great job for my Waterpik, but I've hesitated to use it. (Because I share the Waterpik with my wife, using it to clean the tractor might be hazardous to my health.) My notes in my tractor manual indicate that I successfully used a 4mm hex wrench to remove the plug. When I last replaced the plug, I put high temp thread sealant in the threads of the plug before replacing them. I tried teflon tape the first time (the yellow kind for gas and petroleum fittings) but it's very hard to use on a plug that small. I'm not worried about the hydraulic oil getting out. I'm worried about water getting in. The plug opening is recessed and water will sit on the thread area until it is wiped off or evaporates (or goes into the transmission).
 

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..... When I last replaced the plug, I put high temp thread sealant in the threads of the plug before replacing them. I tried teflon tape the first time (the yellow kind for gas and petroleum fittings) but it's very hard to use on a plug that small. I'm not worried about the hydraulic oil getting out. I'm worried about water getting in. The plug opening is recessed and water will sit on the thread area until it is wiped off or evaporates (or goes into the transmission).
Something like Loctite 545 pneumatic/hydraulic thread sealant? It has a fairly wide range of temperature, -65 °F to 300 °F

I think Permatex has a comparable thread sealant, and another one that is good for -65 °F to 400 °F.

I suppose if you are really concerned about water seeping through the threads, after your thread sealant cures, you could fill in the recessed area with a hump of high temp RTV to prevent water from pooling up in the recess to begin with. It might be a PITA to get off of the area when you need to take it out again though.
 
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My owners manual says you do...

I read the manual..several sections a bunch of times.. to get familiar with my new tractor, and totally missed the "and vent plug", in the line that says (B).Remove dipstick (A) on the right side of the front axle and vent plug (B)."

Too funny...

(Not disagreein' with Ray_PA... I'm probably not takin' mine out either;) ... just sharing what the manual says)
Yep, you are correct. It says to remove it but you can refill the axle without removing. I do mine all the time without removing this vent plug.

It is not different than refilling any gearbox or axle. You pour the oil in slowly with a smaller funnel than the fill hole and it will run right in without air locking.
 

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Something like Loctite 545 pneumatic/hydraulic thread sealant? It has a fairly wide range of temperature, -65 °F to 300 °F

I think Permatex has a comparable thread sealant, and another one that is good for -65 °F to 400 °F.

I suppose if you are really concerned about water seeping through the threads, after your thread sealant cures, you could fill in the recessed area with a hump of high temp RTV to prevent water from pooling up in the recess to begin with. It might be a PITA to get off of the area when you need to take it out again though.
Yup.. any of the Loctite or other PST stuff is awesome for this kind of application...
We used to use 592 on race car head bolts...kept them sealed, and easy to work with later for rebuilds.
MUCH better than tape for this kind of thing. The 565 is fine too... or pretty much any teflon pipe sealant paste would work well.

Water, just under the weight of gravity or even from pressure washing, isn't gettin' in there with any of that product on it.
 

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Something like Loctite 545 pneumatic/hydraulic thread sealant? It has a fairly wide range of temperature, -65 °F to 300 °F

I think Permatex has a comparable thread sealant, and another one that is good for -65 °F to 400 °F.

I suppose if you are really concerned about water seeping through the threads, after your thread sealant cures, you could fill in the recessed area with a hump of high temp RTV to prevent water from pooling up in the recess to begin with. It might be a PITA to get off of the area when you need to take it out again though.
I used Loctite PST.592. The data sheet says it is good to 204 °C., which is 400 ° Fahrenheit. I already had it around because I use it to seal the radiator plug and the heating element. I figured the engine would be always hotter than the transmission, so it should be okay. If this sealant can keep hot coolant under pressure from getting through the radiator plug, I'll trust that it can keep cold water under no pressure out of this vent plug.
 
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