Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,446 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Too much time to think.....

A brief history - when I bought my 2520 it was a non mowing tractor - at the time I had a 757 zero turn. Fast forward about 12 years and now my 2520 is primarily a mowing machine.

I don’t have any real problems with the filled tires, but...I notice quite a few ruts in my lawn area (about 3 acres). Not really ruts but depressions where I track for mowing. I have an issue where I follow the same pattern for mowing every time. I’ve tried to break that routine but just can’t for some reason.

As far as loader work the only thing I do anymore is haul cut up downed trees out to the woods with the forks and occasionally unload stuff from my pickup. Winter I use the bucket with Edge Tamers with rear tire chains - may someday get myself a pusher.

So as an experiment I thought I might remove the liquid which is washer fluid. I would like to somehow capture the fluid to reinstall it if I felt the need. Is there an easy way to do this? I would also have to visit some threads to find the little pump and fittings that folks use to install the washer fluid using a 5 gallon bucket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,503 Posts
The only way I know of to completely get it all out involves removing the tire from the rime and wiping off the rim and tire .

To get some/ most of it out I’d put the valve stem at the six a clock position,connect a hose to the valve stem and collect what you can in buckets. You may need a pump. But I’d try using gravity. Ideally the bucket should be lower than the tire. Maybe you could use car ramps or a hill. :dunno:

I really don’t think your going to see much less damage to your lawn from removal the liquid weight. I have 100lbs of steel weights on each wheel of my tractor. When it comes to lawn damage I noticed very little difference in lawn damage when I take the weights off. The tractor does feel more stable with the wheel weights on. I also seem to have more traction with the weights on which results in not needing to use the dif lock or 4x4 to mow. Wheel spin, or having the wheels locked together does far more damage than just tread marks.

I think your using too big of a tractor,if you want a really nice lawn. But that’s just my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,446 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The only way I know of to completely get it all out involves removing the tire from the rime and wiping off the rim and tire .

To get some/ most of it out I’d put the valve stem at the six a clock position,connect a hose to the valve stem and collect what you can in buckets. You may need a pump. But I’d try using gravity. Ideally the bucket should be lower than the tire. Maybe you could use car ramps or a hill. :dunno:

I really don’t think your going to see much less damage to your lawn from removal the liquid weight. I have 100lbs of steel weights on each wheel of my tractor. When it comes to lawn damage I noticed very little difference in lawn damage when I take the weights off. The tractor does feel more stable with the wheel weights on. I also seem to have more traction with the weights on which results in not needing to use the dif lock or 4x4 to mow. Wheel spin, or having the wheels locked together does far more damage than just tread marks.

I think your using too big of a tractor,if you want a really nice lawn. But that’s just my opinion.
You make some valid points. I have a lot of hills - some quite steep. I am very used to the stability of the tractor where I use it - I certainly don’t want to change that.

I figure the liquid in my tires weighs about 250# each.

I may have taken notice of the ruts more this year as we had record rain last fall where the ground was super saturated.

Sure - too big a tractor - but that’s all I have so use what I have.

I think I will just let it be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,687 Posts
No need for a pump,, inflate the tire to 15 PSI,, remove the valve stem,,
stick a length of rubber gas line on the valve,, the fluid will flow into a container,,

Who cares if the last couple gallons gets out of the tire??

I would not even save the fluid,, unless you think removing the fluid might be a bad decision,,

That is why I added iron weights to the JD 855,,



I was not sure the son-in-law wanted weight,, so I added these weights like training wheels on a bike,,
I thought we might remove the weights if mowing ended up the main duty of the tractor,,,

going on three years now,, the weights are still on,,,
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,928 Posts
I figure the liquid in my tires weighs about 250# each.
Washer fluid weighs ~7.6 lbs/gallon as it is lighter than water. The fill amount for a 14-17.5 R4 tire like on your 2520 is 22 gallons. So the weight of the liquid is approx. 167 lbs per tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,446 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Washer fluid weighs ~7.6 lbs/gallon as it is lighter than water. The fill amount for a 14-17.5 R4 tire like on your 2520 is 22 gallons. So the weight of the liquid is approx. 167 lbs per tire.
Thanks - I was just guessing.

167# - eh - not really worth worrying about. It’s nice right now as I can pick up most trees that fall without worrying about grabbing my ballast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
596 Posts
Thanks - I was just guessing.

167# - eh - not really worth worrying about. It’s nice right now as I can pick up most trees that fall without worrying about grabbing my ballast.
300# is no where enough ballast for picking up much.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
2017 2038r 72” MMM Command Cut 220r loader
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,928 Posts
Thanks - I was just guessing.

167# - eh - not really worth worrying about. It’s nice right now as I can pick up most trees that fall without worrying about grabbing my ballast.
Like you, I have washer fluid in the R4 tires on my 2720. I removed my chains yesterday and was trying to determine how much fluid is in my tires. For some reason I don't think the dealer filled them as full as he was supposed to. I need to verify the level and see if both sides are the same. I guess the only way to do that is rotate the tire and keep burping the valve stem and see at what position fluid stops coming out. Which, with the stems on the inside is a bit of a pain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,446 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
300# is no where enough ballast for picking up much.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
2017 2038r 72” MMM Command Cut 220r loader
It’s enough for what I pick up generally around the edge of the woods.

Like you, I have washer fluid in the R4 tires on my 2720. I removed my chains yesterday and was trying to determine how much fluid is in my tires. For some reason I don't think the dealer filled them as full as he was supposed to. I need to verify the level and see if both sides are the same. I guess the only way to do that is rotate the tire and keep burping the valve stem and see at what position fluid stops coming out. Which, with the stems on the inside is a bit of a pain.
I think mine are pretty full. If I don’t have my stems exactly at 12 o’clock I get some spit when I use my gauge.

The stems on the inside really is a pain. I have to get a stool and wiggle my way in underneath the iMatch and ROPS which is always down - and still have a hard time holding the gauge at the proper position with my hands the way they are.

Then it’s getting back out without hitting my head.....

One time years ago we had a drastic temperature change - don’t even remember now if it was hot to cold or cold to hot. Anyway when that happened there was condensation on the outside of the tires which marked where the fluid level was.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,928 Posts
One time years ago we had a drastic temperature change - don’t even remember now if it was hot to cold or cold to hot. Anyway when that happened there was condensation on the outside of the tires which marked where the fluid level was.
I used to see that once in a while with my old 9N but haven't noticed it with my 2720. That certainly would make it easy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,505 Posts
It’s enough for what I pick up generally around the edge of the woods.



I think mine are pretty full. If I don’t have my stems exactly at 12 o’clock I get some spit when I use my gauge.

The stems on the inside really is a pain. I have to get a stool and wiggle my way in underneath the iMatch and ROPS which is always down - and still have a hard time holding the gauge at the proper position with my hands the way they are.

Then it’s getting back out without hitting my head.....

One time years ago we had a drastic temperature change - don’t even remember now if it was hot to cold or cold to hot. Anyway when that happened there was condensation on the outside of the tires which marked where the fluid level was.
I've seen the "aftermath" of that. Puddles on the barn floor. At first I thought I had a leak, but it was the same for both rear tires. My guess is warm days and then cold nights cause this sweating.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top