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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Seems like this has been a problem for lots of people. Guess the factory mechanics are trained to worry more about liability than customer satisfaction - what a concept.

I'm doing a late first oil change. Only 75 hr in 3 years, but don't want to wait for 100 even though the oil is almost as clear as new. (On my previous tractor, the oil would be black a few hours after a change, even after 300 hours - loose rings?) I have some old Rotella T, which should help complete the break-in.

Now - how to remove the old filter? I have the kind of filter wrench that has a strip of spring steel and a self-locking handle about 8" long. Took the side panel off for access, and it's just possible to reach in with the loader bucket on the floor. There are two angles around the filter were I can get about a 2" swing on the wrench. But though pretty strong, I can't budge the filter.

Would it be easier with the engine hot? My previous experience is that heat swells o-rings, making removal harder - so I would loosen the filter slightly before warming the tractor for an oil change.

Any other tricks? Stick a small crowbar through the filter and twist on that? There doesn't seem to be room for a pipe wrench, and I have no other obvious tool choices here. Is there some kind of filter wrench that drops in on top and takes a 1/2" breaker bar? Will I have to pay for a dealer service this time?

Thanks for any help!
 

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There are many different types of wrenches. I would start with a cup type that takes a ratchet. Go buy a new filter from Deere and see if the have the proper cup. If not I would take the new filter to the auto parts store. They should have the right one.

After that I would use a band type, then a strap type, then I would drive a screwdriver through it as a final attempt. Always as a last resort. Finally I have used a chisel and hammer to turn what was left off on a really stuck one....once. I hope I never have one that tight again.
 

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You need the type that looks like this. They come in a few sizes, each one handles a range of filter diameters.

filter.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Good answers all around - thanks! When I used to fix cars, I was generally able to torque off filters by hand. Not so here!

You need the type that looks like this. They come in a few sizes, each one handles a range of filter diameters.
That's what I need, all right. I'll pick one up next time I buy from Northern Tool or Amazon.

To get the job done this weekend (I hope), I hit the nearest auto supply. They didn't have that style, but did have Toyota cup types that made a nice fit on the new filter's flats. I got one of those, and also a webbing-band one with a long 1/2" drive post. Good thing, too - turns out the original is smooth! Struggled with the webbing one, eventually using a breaker bar pointing one way and a two-foot crescent the other for balance. Destroyed the webbing, but fortunately the (deeply dented) filter popped loose just as the fabric tore. I'll finish the job tomorrow, if no other surprises pop up.

Thanks again for good suggestions. I know a lot more about filter wrenches now!
 

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I tried to use cup type at first but my OEM filter did not have the knurls for the cup to lock into, it was perfectly round on the end. Ended up having to use oil filter pliers. My replacement filter had the knurls so next time I'll be using the cup socket.
 

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I was very pleased that the cup/3/8 drive filter wrench for my GX335 fit the 1026r perfectly. I was even more pleased when the filter came right off with minimal torque (Unlike the transmission filter!).

I think that some "filter assemblers" sort of forget the film of oil on the gasket right around lunchtime on Fridays or Mondays.:laugh: Some are easy, some hard...
 

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I would also wonder if some of them are held on by paint. I know some engines are painted with the filter in place.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Remember the "cup check" in middle school baseball?

I prefer a cup-type filter wrench, myself, where applicable. Remember to ALWAYS wipe the mating surface of the tractor with a lint-free cloth. This is a good habit to get into because it will ensure that the filter's gasket has not stuck in place (many people forget to dbl check). And, ALWAYS lubricate the seal of your new filter with clean oil. If you forget to, your next filter change will not be forgotten as you wrestle with a chisel and hammer to remove what's left of the filer base.
 

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Seems like this has been a problem for lots of people. Guess the factory mechanics are trained to worry more about liability than customer satisfaction - what a concept.

I'm doing a late first oil change. Only 75 hr in 3 years, but don't want to wait for 100 even though the oil is almost as clear as new. (On my previous tractor, the oil would be black a few hours after a change, even after 300 hours - loose rings?) I have some old Rotella T, which should help complete the break-in.

Now - how to remove the old filter? I have the kind of filter wrench that has a strip of spring steel and a self-locking handle about 8" long. Took the side panel off for access, and it's just possible to reach in with the loader bucket on the floor. There are two angles around the filter were I can get about a 2" swing on the wrench. But though pretty strong, I can't budge the filter.

Would it be easier with the engine hot? My previous experience is that heat swells o-rings, making removal harder - so I would loosen the filter slightly before warming the tractor for an oil change.

Any other tricks? Stick a small crowbar through the filter and twist on that? There doesn't seem to be room for a pipe wrench, and I have no other obvious tool choices here. Is there some kind of filter wrench that drops in on top and takes a 1/2" breaker bar? Will I have to pay for a dealer service this time?

Thanks for any help!
On my current 2520, I couldnt get the oil filter off either on its first change. Called the dealer and they sent a guy out on a service call UNDER WARRANTY! He pretty much destroyed a strap type wrench but got it off.. No charge to me.. Ask to see if your dealer will do this or if you can take it in and have them remove it since its the original filter.

IMO they install them at the factory dry.. No oil on the seal.. Every oil, and canister type fuel filter is a bear to remove the original on all my Deeres that I bought new..
 

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Yep - same deal for me with both my 2520 and my '09 F-150 when new. I do believe the filters are installed dry at the factory. For my 2520 a big pair of channel lock plyers did the job - more of a difficult job with the F-150 since the filter has very little access.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The damage

Here's what strap wrench and filter looked like when both finally popped. Original plan was to loosen the filter, warm up the engine and then drain the oil. You can see why I didn't want to start up the tractor after unsticking this filter!
 

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In the words of an oil filter prophet, #+&*@#!!!

Here's what strap wrench and filter looked like when both finally popped. Original plan was to loosen the filter, warm up the engine and then drain the oil. You can see why I didn't want to start up the tractor after unsticking this filter!
I've seen worse. Much worse. You done good!
 

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Oil Filter Strap Wrench Failure

My 1025R has 85 hours and one year since new. Decided to change the oil and oil filter. The filter was stuck as many others have also experienced. I used a John Deere strap oil filter wrench with a 1/2 inch drive breaker bar and three foot pipe extension.

While applying maximum torque I could muster, the wrench gave out at the same moment the filter broke free!

Filter - 1.jpg
 

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My 1025R has 85 hours and one year since new. Decided to change the oil and oil filter. The filter was stuck as many others have also experienced. I used a John Deere strap oil filter wrench with a 1/2 inch drive breaker bar and three foot pipe extension.
While applying maximum torque I could muster, the wrench gave out at the same moment the filter broke free!
There is no way an oil filter should require that much torque to remove. The problem is with the crap design wrench. Most of the exerted force goes into crushing the filter and only a little into a turning moment. Unless you are the 98 pound weakling, a grown man should be able to easily apply 250 pound feet of torque using a 3 foot breaker bar. The filter wasn't on THAT tight! If you have clear access from the bottom, then get an oil filter socket that fits.

Or hammer a screwdriver through it!

Al
 

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As a mechanic by trade, I have many types and brands of tools, and will usually always buy an off-brand tool if I will only use it occasionally.

However, for what it costs, and it pained me to have to buy it, I spent around $25 for a Snap On brand strap wrench. Yes its pricey but I have stood on my 1/2" breaker bar to loosen some filters in the past, and it has always held up. Its shocking what that JD wrench did.

Not sure if Snap-on exclusively makes theirs but, the Gearwrench / KD Tools one is extremely similar in quality. https://www.tooltopia.com/kd-tools-3529.aspx
 

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i use a Harley wrench for all my small filters, fits where others won't, but like everyone else, it only needs to be used once. After that the filters are put on with clean oil and hand tightened. Can not imagine this one breaking...

Harley filter wrenchjpg.jpg
 

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I have had good results with these:
The pliers type has worked for me on every filter I've used them on. The worst was a friends Nissan '94 pickup truck (pre-Frontier). Not the easiest to get into tight places, but neither are most of the others.
 
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