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They say that timing is everything....... there is a topic that was started yesterday about one of the members here putting gasoline in his diesel. Towards the end of it, @SulleyBear told a story of his and I totally forgot..... I was made semi-famous by being in Rockautos newest newsletter. (The July one was just released)
https://www.rockauto.com/Newsletter/

If you didn't want to click on the link, here is my story. And yep, Rockauto sent me a cool t-shirt and a 5-pack of magnets for sharing my story.

Back in my early 20s, I had a '67 Chevelle which I changed the motor on numerous times. One of my most memorable motors was an all black and chrome high performance small block. After adjusting the valves, I took it out to the highway for a road test. After 10 seconds, smoke started pouring out from under the hood, making it look like a car from a James Bond movie. I limped the car home, opened the hood, and oil had soaked the entire engine bay. After washing the motor down and topping off the oil, I started it to find the leak. Goosing the gas repeatedly, no oil was seen. It was odd due to how much was under the engine bay but, I just could not find the source of the leak. So once again, I took it out onto the highway and sure enough, the smoke comes pouring out again. I pulled over and yep, oil all over the engine bay again.

I dragged it back home, cleaned it again and ran it for over an hour and still, not a drop leaked from anywhere. So being the glutton for punishment that I am, once again I took it onto the highway where yep, you guessed it...smoke started billowing out from under the hood.

Being as frustrated as I was, I elected to pull the motor (thankfully, the engine removal on that car was less than a couple hours of work due to the amount of room underhood), and as the engine is just about to clear the radiator support, there it was (or in this case was not). The bolt that should have been in the fuel pump rod hole was missing! I could see the shaft clear as day. Apparently, revving the engine did not allow enough oil to pass through, but at higher RPMs and under load, the oil would pour out. Having painted the block black definitely did not help in diagnosing the issue either.

Needless to say, I found the correct bolt to take up residence in the hole, dropped the engine back in and happily motored on until it was time for a more powerful motor a couple years later. I made sure that one definitely had the fuel pump bolt in place...and was not painted black.

Anthony in New Jersey
So......I know I can't be the only one here that did something bone-headed, where the only thing that got hurt was your pride. Let's here your stories. :good2:

PS, if this is in the wrong section (or could be added to an already existing topic of the same nature), if someone could move it I'd greatly appreciate it. :bigthumb:
 

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They say that timing is everything....... there is a topic that was started yesterday about one of the members here putting gasoline in his diesel. Towards the end of it, @SulleyBear told a story of his and I totally forgot..... I was made semi-famous by being in Rockautos newest newsletter. (The July one was just released)
https://www.rockauto.com/Newsletter/

If you didn't want to click on the link, here is my story. And yep, Rockauto sent me a cool t-shirt and a 5-pack of magnets for sharing my story.



So......I know I can't be the only one here that did something bone-headed, where the only thing that got hurt was your pride. Let's here your stories. :good2:

PS, if this is in the wrong section (or could be added to an already existing topic of the same nature), if someone could move it I'd greatly appreciate it. :bigthumb:
I read that story. It's pretty exciting reading about old Chevelles. It didn't sound unusual to me, because it sounded like something that I would have done. I didn't realize that I knew a celebrity!
 

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Back in the late 80鈥檚 I restored a 70 Dodge Challenger. It had a couple of broken bolts in the heads so I pulled the heads to fix them. I was left with just the short block in the car and cleaned and painted everything. It looked great. I put it back together carefully. Torqued the heads down correctly. Checked everything carefully EXCEPT one thing of course. No radiator fluid. Without water hitting the sending unit it didn鈥檛 even show hot. Lucky me I caught it right away and it didn鈥檛 hurt a thing but it was a near thing.
 

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Back in the olden days, my first car was a 1930 Chevy coupe. I decided one day to clean the carburetor, so without a lot of trouble (everything was accessible on the old six cylinder), I removed the carb, dismantled it, cleaned it and put it back to together and remounted it. I noticed this one strange part, in the bottom of the wash pan, that looked like a short, small pencil. I disregarded it at the time, don't ask me why, probably because I was only 15. When I tried to start it, it wouldn't hit, and all of a sudden I began to smell gasoline. I stopped, and the carb was flooded and gas was running out of it like Gang Busters. It's a wonder it didn't burn to the ground. With a strong admonition from my Dad, and a bit of advice, I found out the strange part was the needle valve, and it was an essential part of the carburetor.

In a similar vein, a friend of mine told the story of when he did his first motor overhaul. He had completed the work, had the engine installed in the car, and was about to give it a shakedown run, when his Dad came up to him, and said "What did you intend to do with these?" He opened his hand, and it was the rod bearings that he had somehow neglected to install.
 

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Rebuilding my TH400 in my Chevy I had to keep pouring transmission fluid in the transmission 3 different times! On the 3rd time I forgot to put my pan on and dumped around 3 Qts in before it started coming out from under the truck! Man that was one big mess to clean up! 4th time was even better it came out my tail shaft had not put the Transfer Case on yet! Least that time I did not lose as much? If I gave it more thought I could come up with good stories been working on stuff for over 60 years now getting in trouble self teaching myself!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Uf I gave it more thought I could come up with good stories been working on stuff for over 60 years now getting in trouble self teaching myself!
Im on 40 years and while I definitely have a lot more stories I can happily admit to, Id like to hope Im not done making a few more !!! :laugh:
 

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The only one I can remember right now -

My daughter鈥檚 first car was a Hyundai. She said she needed the oil changed so I pulled it in the barn.

After getting it up in ramps I pulled the plug. Huh....why is this oil red....?

I have never been involved with a little front wheel drive car before. I got underneath and pulled the first plug I saw. Yes....it was the transmission.

Now it鈥檚 disabled up in the ramps and had no idea of what fluid is supposed to be in there. Ended up filtering the dropped fluid and putting it back in so she could get home - after I changed her oil then.
 

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Simple things like using the drain pans containers which you lay on the side and the oil fills them and then you put the plug in and can carry the enclosed pan and dispose of the oil. But forgetting to pull the plug out of the side of the container and then you do pull the engine drain plug and the oil runs all over the floor around the drain pan container. I have seen that done several times and it always makes a mess...........

https://www.amazon.com/Hopkins-11838-FloTool-15-Quart-Drain/dp/B000AMGYNA/ref=sr_1_15?keywords=oil+change+containers&qid=1564976078&s=gateway&sr=8-15
 

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Yesterday, in the NASCAR Xfinity race, the winner of the race blew up the engine in the car by over revving it during the celebratory burn out. Not only did he do a terrible job on the burnout, he failed to shift the car during the burn out and you could hear the car over revving and for some reason, the rev limiter didn't protect the engine. Perhaps they had the wrong chips in the MSD module or failed to put the chips in, which are only about $5 per chip and they are RPM limited, so when you snap in a 7,400 RPM chip, if the car hits 7,400 RPM's, the ignition module will misfire preventing the engine RPM's from increasing.

You could hear him hit the limiter twice and then he went up against the limiter and held it there, which will kill and engine and it did. He ended up walking to Victory Lane and they didn't push the car into Victory lane, likely because it was spewing fluid and would have been a mess for people to walk through in Victory lane.

Very much a rookie mistake. It was his first win, so I can understand he was likely excited. He drove like a veteran when he was fighting for the win with A.J. Allmindinger, who is a very accomplished road racer. But to put the car "On the chip and hold it", I wouldn't be surprised if Roger Penske charges the driver for part of the engine, to make a point. The engines are about $100,000 each in those cars and he trashed it doing the pointless burn out. The announcers started to mention what he had done and then stopped talking about it, probably to save the driver further humiliation. But anyone who has been around the race engines knew exactly what the driver did and its very much an avoidable issue..............Its painful to hear that happen because you know it didn't need to occur. Even if the rev limiter didn't function correctly, there is no excuse for over revving it in the burnout.

In drag racing, we did burn outs every single run to clean and warm the tires and to put down our own rubber for traction. You get the rear wheels spinning and shift into a higher gear and maintain the engine RPMs but drastically increase the tire spin speed. The kid who won, simply put the car in first and held the accelerator down, which isn't how you do a burnout successfully. You also hold the front brake to create rolling resistance by adjusting the brake bias, to get the rear wheels spinning easier. Its called using your "Line Lock" or "Brake assisted burnouts".

Kids.......:banghead::banghead::laugh::lol:
 

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Used to dread changing oil on the 7.3 ford diesel.

On my "last" attempt.( circa 1990 something).it takes 2 pans as it held 12 quarts or whatever..more than 1 pan.

Unscrewed filter whilst pan was still in place to not make any mess....silly me.

Dropped filter....splashed allover..ruined a brand new flannel shirt....filter hit bottom of well used pan and cracked a hole in it.
You can guess the rest.
I have not changed oil in a diesel truck at home since...disaterous mess.:banghead:

I pull into quaker lube with the trailer in tow..watch and talk to the friendly asian fellow that runs it.
Pay my 70 bux and back out.

In the 20 minutes it takes...I could not buy the filter & oil + my time and theres ZERO mess.

I do change oil in motorcycles and other smallish items at home:unknown:
 

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When I was young and na茂ve, I changed the oil and filter on my 1973 Trans Am. Started the engine and heard a splashing noise. Looked under the car and the carport had an oil lake underneath. Yep, the old oil gasket was still on the engine. I didn't know to look out for that. I embarrassed myself even more by taking the new and old filter back to the parts store, and complained that something looked different between the two filters. The parts guy informed me the gasket was missing off the old filter and where it could be found. Duh.


:slap-yourself-emoti
 

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Had to drop the fuel tank in a 79 Cutlass to patch a hole in it and put it all back together without reinstalling the fuel line. Had to do it all over again. This was back when staring at something you don鈥檛 want to remove took longer than just doing it. Those straps holding that Fuel tank sucked to get back on. Especially in my sisters driveway in Grand Rapids MI in February. These are the reasons why I prefer to make car payments, not parts runs nowadays. Fast forward 18 years ago I let my brother talk me into using my garage to swap motors in his van. Of course I had to get in and get my hands dirty just to help him out and have my garage bay back by the end of the weekend. Anyway, after many long hours of cussing at each other, and laughing just as much, we got er all swapped out, started it, and didn鈥檛 see the bolt left in the timing chain cover that caused so much racket. Luckily it didn鈥檛 do any damage. Those were the days of figuring stuff out on your own laying on the floor all greasy with crap falling in your eyes.
 

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Yesterday, in the NASCAR Xfinity race, the winner of the race blew up the engine in the car by over revving it during the celebratory burn out. Not only did he do a terrible job on the burnout, he failed to shift the car during the burn out and you could hear the car over revving and for some reason, the rev limiter didn't protect the engine. Perhaps they had the wrong chips in the MSD module or failed to put the chips in, which are only about $5 per chip and they are RPM limited, so when you snap in a 7,400 RPM chip, if the car hits 7,400 RPM's, the ignition module will misfire preventing the engine RPM's from increasing.

You could hear him hit the limiter twice and then he went up against the limiter and held it there, which will kill and engine and it did. He ended up walking to Victory Lane and they didn't push the car into Victory lane, likely because it was spewing fluid and would have been a mess for people to walk through in Victory lane.
Just curious, because I don't know the answer.... Does the driver get in any trouble for blowing the engine after a win? I know the engines are expensive but I'm assuming they don't just re-use one as-is anyway??? The sponsors whose names are on the car would probably hand them a new engine for every time their car wins, wouldn't they?? Like I said, not criticizing at all, just never thought about it

Edit-- I do remember Cole Trickle getting some heat for intentionally blowing his engine in Days of Thunder... lol

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Haven鈥檛 watched a NASCAR race in 20 years since I discovered F1, but in F1, they are only allowed so many engines in a season, so that engine might have been done anyways, or he鈥檚 just being a nascar driver. Muricah
 

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Yesterday, in the NASCAR Xfinity race, the winner of the race blew up the engine in the car by over revving it during the celebratory burn out.
I've always thought that a Celebratory burnout was stupid for a couple of reasons.
unnecessary wear and tear and poor sportsmanship, like spiking the football.

I have done my share of beating on cars when I was younger.
At times my harsh treatment resulted in broken U-joints, destroyed clutch discs, trashed transmissions and blown engines.

One big difference is back then cars were easy to fix and parts were plentiful and cheap.

Now days I baby my cars. I leave burnouts to the young and stupid. I have better things to do with my time and money than fixing a broken car due to my own stupid behavior.

I can't really remember any mistake or blunders I have done. Most likely its cause of my age, not cause I never made one. I had to learn everything I did by trial and error. That type of learning is nothing but mistakes and blunders.
 

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I used to do burn outs in my little front wheel drive / 4WD Subaru Brat. It was great fun until I had to replace all 4 tires when I wore out the front ones. Had to replace all 4 to keep the diameters the same for the 4WD to work properly.

I was young and dumb then. Now I'm older and dumb.
 

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Just curious, because I don't know the answer.... Does the driver get in any trouble for blowing the engine after a win? I know the engines are expensive but I'm assuming they don't just re-use one as-is anyway??? The sponsors whose names are on the car would probably hand them a new engine for every time their car wins, wouldn't they?? Like I said, not criticizing at all, just never thought about it

Edit-- I do remember Cole Trickle getting some heat for intentionally blowing his engine in Days of Thunder... lol

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Yours is a good question and I am glad you asked it.

Basically, its just the cost of the engine. Most of the sponsors simply write checks to the teams for their support. The teams have business deals with all of their suppliers. Large teams have their own engine shops and many others lease engines through programs from the larger teams, based upon brand support. Ford teams share a lot of the same engines, Toyota's are largely controlled by Toyota Motor Sports or whatever their racing division is called. There are several sources of Chevy engines, from Hendricks Race Engines, Childress Race engines and others.

Basically, there are a hand full of teams in the Xfinity series which are very well capitalized, like Penske, JR Motorsports (Which is Dale Earnheardt Jr's teams, of which he has 4 teams in Xfinity last time I checked) and then the majority of the teams are on much tighter budgets. Its part of why there are such differences in the cars, horsepower, etc between Monster Energy Series cars and Xfinity cars. I think the Xfinity cars are about 550 hp where the Monster energy are about 900 to 950 hp. Also, the cars are built differently, with different bodies, different suspensions (not major differences, more in terms of sophistication than actual design function).

So in Nascar's Monster Energy Series, blowing up an engine is probably $150,000 t0 $185,000 in cost where the Xfinity engines are more in the $85,000 to $100,000 per engine in cost.

Its important to note that blowing up an engine doesn't always mean its a "complete loss". In my drag racing days, I only ever "Grenaded" one engine, which I broke the crankshaft in 3 pieces at the finish line, which knocked the side out of the all alunimum engine block and damaged the base of the cylinder. Even knocking a hole in a block can be repaired in some instances and then the blocks can be reused or sold down the line to a lower series of racing where they would be thrilled to get ahold of such a piece.

The engine shops will remove the good pieces, which might be the fuel system (Carb and Intake, Fuel Injection System, etc as those usually aren't harmed unless there is a fire) and the cylinder heads might be ok, etc. They check each piece and can reuse those which aren't damaged. Of course, parts might have to be re-machined, etc. So, when they blow up an engine, its not always a total loss, but its going to be expensive for sure.

I doubt the teams have a specific "penalty" for blowing up the engines, but they likely reduce the drivers "profit sharing" part of their compensation. Also, when something avoidable happens, like was the case with the Xfinity engine in Saturdays race, you can bet the owner and driver are going to be discussing it in detail.

There have been several instances the last year where on the road courses in NASCAR, the driver missed shift or downshifted incorrectly and "blew up" the engine. Those are worse than "over revving" and blowing up the engine because it often also breaks the drive train in the car, tearing out the clutch, the transmission, driveshaft, rear end gears and or axle. That's one thing about racing, mistakes can be very expensive.

There's a common saying in racing as a team owner.....

You know how to end up with $5 million dollars after racing for a single season?

Start with $15 million............:laugh:

:lol:
 

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I used to do burn outs in my little front wheel drive / 4WD Subaru Brat. It was great fun until I had to replace all 4 tires when I wore out the front ones. Had to replace all 4 to keep the diameters the same for the 4WD to work properly.

I was young and dumb then. Now I'm older and dumb.

Are you going to be posting any videos of you doing a burnout in your sweeties ride? After all, you are just older..........
 

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Last I knew nascar thought about penalizing blown motors and flat tires causing tech failures but decided not to.

The motors are one race and rebuild, but the race purse covers the damage from a burnout and there are many dimensions that cannot be measured to a tolerance with post race damage..... life m up. I long ago tired of the bills and labor of showing off.
 
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