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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2025r
I was having trouble with quick disconnect not connecting so like a DA I backed off a connector nut on the loader. While it did relieve the pressure and allowed the QD to connect, I now have a leak at the nut I backed off and Re tightened.
Here is pic of the nut I backed off and Re tightened and now leaks.
It appears that it is not coming from thread but the fitting right above. Don’t know if there is an o ring in there or not.
If I remove and replace the entire fitting, how can I avoid losing all my fluid?
Is there a thread sealer that can be used?
What would you try before replacing?
Appreciate any help I can get.
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Hood Motor vehicle Fluid Automotive design Fixture
 

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1025r with Mauser cab.
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The ORing is probably either pinched or displaced. I would relieve the pressure in the system once the tractor is shut off, make sure the loader is down and move the SCV back and forth and side to side with the engine off and the loader down.

Then remove the fitting and look inside. Chances are the Oring is pinched or out of place and it should be easy to remedy.

Proceed carefully as you know what happens when the system is under pressure. Also, you can get a tool to relieve the pressure in the fittings with a specialty tool. Here is the link.

Get is at Ken's Bolt on Hooks

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You can actually buy replacement "O" rings at Home Depot, or you can buy complete kits with a good assortment of "O" rings in metric or English sizes from Amazon.

Amazon.com : o ring kit

Regardless, make sure that any "O" ring or kit you buy has "O" rings made from Nitrile rubber.

Nitrile rubber, also known as nitrile butadiene rubber, NBR, Buna-N, and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber, is a synthetic rubber derived from acrylonitrile (ACN) and butadiene.[1] Trade names include Perbunan, Nipol, Krynac and Europrene. This rubber is unusual in being resistant to oil, fuel, and other chemicals.

NBR is used in the automotive and aeronautical industry to make fuel and oil handling hoses, seals, grommets, and self-sealing fuel tanks.[2] It is used in the nuclear industry to make protective gloves. NBR's stability at high temperatures from −40 to 108 °C (−40 to 226 °F) makes it an ideal material for aeronautical applications. Nitrile butadiene is also used to produce moulded goods, footwear, adhesives, sealants, sponges, expanded foams, and floor mats.

Its resilience makes NBR a useful material for disposable lab, cleaning, and examination gloves. Nitrile rubber is more resistant than natural rubber to oils and acids, and has superior strength, but has inferior flexibility. Nitrile gloves are therefore more puncture-resistant than natural rubber gloves, especially if the latter are degraded by exposure to chemicals or ozone.[citation needed] Nitrile rubber is less likely to cause an allergic reaction than natural rubber.[citation needed]
 

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If you need to get another O Ring and want to get it from John Deere to make sure its the correct one, you can use this as a reference. From the picture, I believe it is number 16 but confirm that with the parts department should you need a new O ring. If there is any chance the old o ring is damaged, I would certainly replace it with a new one.......

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you need to get another O Ring and want to get it from John Deere to make sure its the correct one, you can use this as a reference. From the picture, I believe it is number 16 but confirm that with the parts department should you need a new O ring. If there is any chance the old o ring is damaged, I would certainly replace it with a new one.......

View attachment 814991
Where did you get your schematic?
 

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Where did you get your schematic?
It's is from the John Deere Parts Book. Here is a link to the actual page.


Hope this helps. Once you get into the parts book, you can back a page or two with the controls at the top left of the page and it will take you to other menu's, etc. The parts book is a very handy resource. Its take a little bit to get used to it, but once you see how its laid out and functions, its a very handy tool for seeing exploded images of parts and assemblies and how everything fits together.............and the spare parts numbers and costs. You can even choose your dealer as the dealer for the parts you are looking up and it will show you the costs and even availability of the parts in most cases...........
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's is from the John Deere Parts Book. Here is a link to the actual page.


Hope this helps. Once you get into the parts book, you can back a page or two with the controls at the top left of the page and it will take you to other menu's, etc. The parts book is a very handy resource. Its take a little bit to get used to it, but once you see how its laid out and functions, its a very handy tool for seeing exploded images of parts and assemblies and how everything fits together.............and the spare parts numbers and costs. You can even choose your dealer as the dealer for the parts you are looking up and it will show you the costs and even availability of the parts in most cases...........
It’s actually an H130 loader but I guess o rings are same.
Still trying to find my way around the website to find the H130😀

Where did you get your schematic?

Still have a small drip. Not continuous but enough to show on shoo Rowell. I’m afraid to tighten it too much as I don’t want to wreck the fitting. Here is schematic of H130 Loader
 

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Looking at parts catalog, I don't think there's an o-ring where hose(s) attaches to cylinder(s). I can determine where all the o-rings go, all 17 in total, and none go to the cylinder end of the hoses.

Just in case! Park tractor in an area where it will be out of the way for a week if necessary! Lower arms, put bucket flat on ground, shut tractor down, and move control levers back & forth to remove any residual pressure. Not sure of you scv and you may need to do this with engine off but key "on". SLOWLY loosen leaking fitting and the remove completely. I'm "thinking" you'll find a male 37º fitting on your cylinder and a female 37º swivel fitting on your hose end. Inspect both fittings CLOSELY looking for debris or cracks. Inspect nut for cracks also. Sometimes over-tightening can can crack/split a nut and it won't tighten properly again.

Plan "B" is remove hose, take pic of inside of hose end, fitting on cylinder, and post pics. Bob
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Looking at parts catalog, I don't think there's an o-ring where hose(s) attaches to cylinder(s). I can determine where all the o-rings go, all 17 in total, and none go to the cylinder end of the hoses.

Just in case! Park tractor in an area where it will be out of the way for a week if necessary! Lower arms, put bucket flat on ground, shut tractor down, and move control levers back & forth to remove any residual pressure. Not sure of you scv and you may need to do this with engine off but key "on". SLOWLY loosen leaking fitting and the remove completely. I'm "thinking" you'll find a male 37º fitting on your cylinder and a female 37º swivel fitting on your hose end. Inspect both fittings CLOSELY looking for debris or cracks. Inspect nut for cracks also. Sometimes over-tightening can can crack/split a nut and it won't tighten properly again.

Plan "B" is remove hose, take pic of inside of hose end, fitting on cylinder, and post pics. Bob
Thank you for your reply.
I know there was one in there because I saved it in a baggie and it was the only fitting I disconnected.
Will try some of you solutions. Driving me crazy!
 

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The cylinders have -06 ORFS (o ring face seal) fittings on them. I think the part #13 above will fit them as well even though the drawing does not show that,
 

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From GreenPartStore, here's the specs for item 13 T77613:
John Deere O-Ring
Specification
Inside Diameter0.364 IN
Nominal Section0.070 IN
Standard Number CodeA
Standard Number Size012
Durometer90
MaterialH4D
Finish
Note

After some difficulty, I found specs for a -06ORFS o-ring: .36" ID x .07 width. This info from Parker Hyd.

Hopefully to not confuse things, this is also known as a 012, as spec'd in the Deere info. Here's info for that:
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SO! As Kennyd stated, item #13 will work. Bob
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks
The cylinders have -06 ORFS (o ring face seal) fittings on them. I think the part #13 above will fit them as well even though the drawing does not show that,
thank you so much! I’m not going crazy after all. Now that I’m sure the o ring belongs there, I can work on the leak storage.
Question:
I will be gone 5-6 hours today.
Was wondering how best to leave tractor so that a leak might occur and I can see when I return.
 

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Thinking that's the bucket cylinder and not the arm lift cylinder. Raise arms, maybe 4-6 feet above ground level. make bottom of bucket parallel with ground. Shut tractor down and do NOT operate bucket levers!

Gravity will want to make your bucket tip down/dump position. pressure in the bucket cylinders will prevent this as long as cylinders aren't leaking! After 5-6 hours, your bucket may/could drift down anyways do to internal leaks (called slippage) and you may not see any external oil. Raise bucket, do what you gotta do, and see what happens! Bob
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thinking that's the bucket cylinder and not the arm lift cylinder. Raise arms, maybe 4-6 feet above ground level. make bottom of bucket parallel with ground. Shut tractor down and do NOT operate bucket levers!

Gravity will want to make your bucket tip down/dump position. pressure in the bucket cylinders will prevent this as long as cylinders aren't leaking! After 5-6 hours, your bucket may/could drift down anyways do to internal leaks (called slippage) and you may not see any external oil. Raise bucket, do what you gotta do, and see what happens! Bob
Thinking that's the bucket cylinder and not the arm lift cylinder. Raise arms, maybe 4-6 feet above ground level. make bottom of bucket parallel with ground. Shut tractor down and do NOT operate bucket levers!

Gravity will want to make your bucket tip down/dump position. pressure in the bucket cylinders will prevent this as long as cylinders aren't leaking! After 5-6 hours, your bucket may/could drift down anyways do to internal leaks (called slippage) and you may not see any external oil. Raise bucket, do what you gotta do, and see what happens! Bob
Maybe I’m expecting too much but I would think if I installed the proper o ring and tightened the nut correctly there should be no leak.
Am I expecting too much. Should I just replace the entire 12 inch hose?
Last night bucket dropped about 6 inches. However there was oil spot about 4 inches round in cardboard underneath. Also yesterday afternoon I drove tractor some cycling bucket etc. more drips around the threads of fitting into cylinder.
 

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My questions are did you install a new o-ring or the old one? If new, from Deere or box store and what's the material? Did you remove the hose completely and inspect sealing surface on hose and cylinder fitting as well as nut?

Before replacing anything, verify 100% WHAT is leaking! Wipe/spray everything near where the leak is. Run/use bucket, shut down and look for leak. If you get a can of corn starch or baby powder and dust the area of the leak, the powder will stick to the oil leak and (mostly!) fall off the cleaned surface. Bob
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
My questions are did you install a new o-ring or the old one? If new, from Deere or box store and what's the material? Did you remove the hose completely and inspect sealing surface on hose and cylinder fitting as well as nut?

Before replacing anything, verify 100% WHAT is leaking! Wipe/spray everything near where the leak is. Run/use bucket, shut down and look for leak. If you get a can of corn starch or baby powder and dust the area of the leak, the powder will stick to the oil leak and (mostly!) fall off the cleaned surface. Bob
New o ring from Deere. Don’t know material other than he looked it up and said this was the one.
I removed the hose and inspected everything before I installed new o ring. It was tough getting it over the flange but finally went on.
I am wondering if he gave me the correct o ring and if I should have had this much trouble getting it on.
There is another fitting exactly like this one on other side. Wonder if I should take it off to see if I have everything back together? Or just buy the entire new hose with fittings, o rings and nuts.
Yes I am sure it is leaking at the threads where the nut screws on.
Thanks for your help. I’m sure you have a ton of other things to do.
 

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I removed the hose and inspected everything before I installed new o ring. It was tough getting it over the flange but finally went on.
Something isn't right ... With an ORFS fitting, there is no flange the o-ring has to go over. The o-ring fits into a groove. Then the o-ring seals against the "face" of the matching fitting.

ORFS = O-Ring -Face-Seal
 

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O-ring fittings come in several types and ORFS (O-Ring Face Seal), ORB (O-Ring Boss), and flange seal (2 flanges bolted together) are the most common. None of these use an o-ring slipped over a flange. The pic below show 2 types with the ORFS on the left and the ORB on the right. The fitting on your cylinder should look like the fitting on the left, ORFS

You may have stretched the o-ring too much, so replace it! Clean the groove in the end of the fitting on the cylinder, apply hyd. oil to groove, o-ring, and threads on fitting. Place o-ring in groove on cylinder fitting and snug nut on hose. As you "snugging" nut, wiggle hose...raise/lower/rotate... to help properly align "Face" (flat surface) on end of tube with o-ring. The proper torque on the nut is 29 ft-lb or a firm pull on the wrench.

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Hope this helps or at least clarifies things! Keep us posted, Bob
 
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