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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First post! Glad to join a Green forum. Been waiting over 5 weeks for a new 2520. It's my first tractor and I could not resist the gravitational pull of the $2,500 promotion.

Yesterday I was told that it will be released today and expected at the dealer on the 20th.

In the meantime I am prepping a used #46 backhoe.
I have a chafed stabilizer hose that is dripping and another just chafed. So I am going to replace both.

Never having worked on hydraulics before I wanted to ask what to expect when I start to disconnect the hoses. The stabilizer cylinder is in the "un exteded" position. Just want to do it safely :unknown:

I was thinking to start at the highest point (valve assembly) so I would not have all the fluid in the hose immediately draining. I am a little worried that I might take a hydro shower or at the least have hydro fluid all over the place.
 

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WELCOME ST, to DT we are glad you found us and are here. :good2:

I am not a hydraulics expert either, but I would think that is going to get messy to some degree anyway. Here a couple of my inexperience thoughts (am sure some will correct my errors :tongue:):

I would think that if the BH is disconnected from the power source there should not be any high pressure anywhere. There maybe some residual pressure in some of the lines but should bleed off pretty quick. Just make sure you crack the fittings slowly. You will get drainage no matter what you do, just be prepared with plenty of rags. I really don't think you have problem.

You lucky dog, a used backhoe for your machine before you even get the tractor. I would love a backhoe.

Kenny will be here shortly to straighten me out on this. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Randy thanks.

Yes very lucky to find not only a used backhoe, but one with the 2520 subframe. I actually bought the backhoe after ordering my 2520.

The good thing is I have enough time while waiting to get these small items out of the way before the 2520 arrives, plus some "honey do" projects.
 

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Welcome SM

Hoses are pretty simple straight up R+R.

Just make sure the cylinder is parked or secured as to not move.

If your stabilizer is in its "un-extended" position, tie it up so it won't fall when you remove the hose.

Or relax it down in to a resting position. (that might not be possible without hydraulics hooked up)
 

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Welcome to DT Smalltown:lol:

Everybody gave great advice so far, nothing more for me to add:thumbup1gif:
 

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I blew a hose on my bucket, after I replace the hose I only had to add more hydraulic oil and everything worked out fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Wow did the summer fly by

Well the project(s) lasted longer than I imagined and on top of that the vegetation grew so much that I had decided to wait until this fall or even next spring when I will be able to see the rocks and stumps that I will be working on/driving over. The good news is my 2520 has done a yeoman's job this summer I could not be happier with my purchase: no buyers remorse here :thumbup1gif:


Next project in the way: insulate the garage, put in the power, lighting and heater. In the meantime today I moved the #46 into the garage on deck circle.

I am almost ready to disconnect the two hydraulic lines from one stabilizer cylinder that I need to replace. I have two really novice questions to ask about removing the hose connections.
It occured to me that while removing one end of the hose it would be tightening the other and vice versa.

I have located what I think is the manufacturer of the JD model 46 backhoe and it appears to be the Bush Hog company. It looks the same as the model 665H with the exception that it is not used as a 3 point mounted backhoe as the Bush Hog manual shows rather outfitted to be used with a JD subframe.

I have included a jpeg of the parts page. I see that my two hydro hoses are listed as #2 are "3/8 NPTM x 3/8 NPTM x 34" TSC carries a pre-made hose that I am tempted to try they are 36".
http://www.tractorsupply.com/agricu.../hydraulic-hose-3-8-in-2-wire-36-in-l-1810018

Diagram Text Technical drawing Plan Drawing

Looks like I will also try to protect both the existing and new hoses with something like this "flex split" conduit. http://www.tractorsupply.com/traile...nduit-flex-split-black-3-8-in-x-5-ft--1041627

Furthermore the lines terminate on one end with 90 deg. "Union adapters" and on the other with straight "Union adapters". Not being familiar with "Union adapters" other than adapting from one size to another do these adapters swivel?

So before I do something dumb do I put a wrench on the hose fitting to keep it from turning and wrench the union adapter away from the stabilizer cylinder and then seperate the adapter from the hose after?
 

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Righty Tighty...Lefty Loosey on the fittings is the simple part. The real fun arrives when you go to get fittings as there are more fitting types (e.g. ORFS, ORB, NPT (evil), JIC, BSPP, BSPT, Komatsu, etc) than Carter has pills. Deere uses a lot of ORFS (O-Ring Face Seal) and ORB (O-Ring Boss) on their equipment.

Since you're a hydraulics newbie, I suggest you find a Parker Store or other hydraulics place near you until you understand the fitting types and lingo before buying stuff on the net or at TSC. The net is cheaper; but if you get the wrong thing, return shipping will quickly eat into your savings.

Oh, and when the manuals say be careful about hydraulic injection injuries, they mean it as 2,000-PSI and up can wreck your day quickly. As I understand it the picture below is of a guy's hand after the surgeon opened it up to get the oil out. I use cardboard drywall shims for leak finding when under pressure. I have to resist the urge to use my finger like I do with household plumbing at 60-PSI.
 

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ST: One or both ends of the hose will swivel, no worries there. Discount Hydraulic Hose also has some nice products you can get for hose protection. I can get more specific later when I get to a PC if you need more help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Added jpeg of parts

I just edited my post to add the missing jpeg if neededj
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hoses are finally off

Well it was a lot easier than I thought. The swivel end (adapter union fitting) on both ends on both hoses were either frozen or really installed quite tight.
Two wrenches and a rubber hammer finally loosened the adapters so I could see how these things go together and see the swivel action. Hydraulic fluid loss was minimal. :thumbup1gif:

I had two new hoses made up at NAPA (oucccccccccch). The counter person make a passing remark about using a larger outside dimention hose and I didn't think anything of until I tried to install the hoses.
The spot where one on the hoses attaches immediately turns to one side to route around a rubber bumper so it's in a little tight. Won't be in a position to test for a few days as I have to much of the backhoe apart. I hope that's not an issue. I did not see any type of thread sealant so I installed the new hoses dry.

Finally drove out most of the pins in the boom, dipper stick and bucket to see what things looked like. Pretty dry and "crudded up" so I have been cleaning up with emery cloth and painting the cylinder ends that had surface rust.
A little more paint, new thrust washers and I should be able to start piecing it back together. I'll be glad to start pumping greese into all the fittings.
 

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Glad to hear you are making progress. Thanks for the update. :good2:
 

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Good deal. The only fittings that use thread sealant are the evil NPT ones. You have to be careful with it so as not to contaminate your system. The first thread or two needs to be kept clear of sealant.

You do know we'd like pictures if at all possible.
 

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I did not see any type of thread sealant so I installed the new hoses dry.
There is no sealant used on the JIC or ORB type connectors, but a drop of hydraulic oil on the threads will help assembly and keep then from getting corroded over the life of the connection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So a drop of Hydrofluid on my NPT threads would be a good idea? If so I will take them apart and do it!
 

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So a drop of Hydrofluid on my NPT threads would be a good idea? If so I will take them apart and do it!
No, NPT needs a sealant-preferably a PTFE base paste and not Teflon tape from Home Cheapot.

I specifically wrote JIC and ORB.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ok started to seach for NPT sealant with PTFE. Locktite 569 seems to fit yhe bill. Once these sealants set up are the fittings easy to wrench apart if necessary.

Since I need this sealant fairly quickly I'll take a look at the local automotive parts stores. I understand the idea when using thread tape to keep the tape away from the ends to apparently avoid any tape breaking off and contaminating my hydro system. Since I am not using tape does the same caution apply that I should apply the sealant but keep it away from the last threads?

It's probably mundane to anybody but myself, but I'll try and take a few photos today.
 

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Ok started to seach for NPT sealant with PTFE. Locktite 569 seems to fit yhe bill. Once these sealants set up are the fittings easy to wrench apart if necessary.

Since I need this sealant fairly quickly I'll take a look at the local automotive parts stores. I understand the idea when using thread tape to keep the tape away from the ends to apparently avoid any tape breaking off and contaminating my hydro system. Since I am not using tape does the same caution apply that I should apply the sealant but keep it away from the last threads?

It's probably mundane to anybody but myself, but I'll try and take a few photos today.
Are you sure you have NPT fittings? The paste will dissipate in the system so there is not a huge concern about getting it in the fluid-but that said you don't want to load in there either.

We love pictures, no matter the subject!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yes the Bush hog manual indicates NPT. I asked the counter person at NAPA when I had the hoses made up if I was correct in calling it an NPT fitting and they said yes.

Looks like Locktite also has a 401 product with PTFE.
 

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Yes the Bush hog manual indicates NPT. I asked the counter person at NAPA when I had the hoses made up if I was correct in calling it an NPT fitting and they said yes.

Looks like Locktite also has a 401 product with PTFE.
Got it...I for some reason thought they where JIC's

I have also used Pematex #80632 with good results. Both products need to "set-up" before you apply pressure-but that should be fine for you.
 
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