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I had a new shop built last summer, and I went back and forth on having windows installed at the time. In the end, no windows were installed. That was a mistake.

The building is 2x6 construction on 24" centers and skinned over with corrugated metal. It will be insulated and drywalled soon after the windows go in. I'm planning the window install now, and would like to get some advice on the subject. I will be building a properly dimensioned rough opening for the windows to fit into. I'm imagining removing sections of metal siding and using new construction windows with mounting flanges and built in J channels. Then I would cut out the metal to be just slightly (1/4" larger than the window), and install it behind the J channel. Caulk between window and siding, and call it good?

Am I missing something? I'm concerned how the window will sit given the fact the metal is corrugated. One side might be on a hump and one side in a valley. I have flexibility and can probably minimize that by making small adjustments to the location, but top and bottom will have lots of peaks and valleys along the width of the window.
 

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I had a new shop built last summer, and I went back and forth on having windows installed at the time. In the end, no windows were installed. That was a mistake.

The building is 2x6 construction on 24" centers and skinned over with corrugated metal. It will be insulated and drywalled soon after the windows go in. I'm planning the window install now, and would like to get some advice on the subject. I will be building a properly dimensioned rough opening for the windows to fit into. I'm imagining removing sections of metal siding and using new construction windows with mounting flanges and built in J channels. Then I would cut out the metal to be just slightly (1/4" larger than the window), and install it behind the J channel. Caulk between window and siding, and call it good?

Am I missing something? I'm concerned how the window will sit given the fact the metal is corrugated. One side might be on a hump and one side in a valley. I have flexibility and can probably minimize that by making small adjustments to the location, but top and bottom will have lots of peaks and valleys along the width of the window.

Your on the right track. On my Morton the doors and windows are a positioned so the sides of them are on the flats. The use a j-channel top and bottom so the ridges and lows don’t matter. They use a different piece on the side, (until I looked I would have told you it was a j-channel) but it is boxed in. See photos, the door shows it well.
 

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Your on the right track. On my Morton the doors and windows are a positioned so the sides of them are on the flats. The use a j-channel top and bottom so the ridges and lows don’t matter. They use a different piece on the side, (until I looked I would have told you it was a j-channel) but it is boxed in. See photos, the door shows it well.
This is how we do it also!:bigthumb:
 

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I had a new shop built last summer, and I went back and forth on having windows installed at the time. In the end, no windows were installed. That was a mistake.

The building is 2x6 construction on 24" centers and skinned over with corrugated metal. It will be insulated and drywalled soon after the windows go in. I'm planning the window install now, and would like to get some advice on the subject. I will be building a properly dimensioned rough opening for the windows to fit into. I'm imagining removing sections of metal siding and using new construction windows with mounting flanges and built in J channels. Then I would cut out the metal to be just slightly (1/4" larger than the window), and install it behind the J channel. Caulk between window and siding, and call it good?

Am I missing something? I'm concerned how the window will sit given the fact the metal is corrugated. One side might be on a hump and one side in a valley. I have flexibility and can probably minimize that by making small adjustments to the location, but top and bottom will have lots of peaks and valleys along the width of the window.

Just my thoughts,
Several years ago I built a garage and wanted windows on several sides. Had very good friend helping me and he stated this. Just and FYI. Remember windows take up wall space from storage inside, also let people now you are working late in garage trying to get something done and THE FINAL THOUGHT its is an easy way in to garage. I went without windows and had it that way for 35 years, We have since sold and moved from that domain, I just wanted to share my 2 cents and I really don't expect any change,

WALTMART
 

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Same Here

Walt
I did the the same as you except I do have some about 9-1/2 Ft above the floor. They are about 16" x 24" and are to get some day light into the shop. Shop ceiling height is 12'.
Leo
 

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Em14

EM14
Thanks for the reply, Yep once you poke holes in the side of it really hard to cover them up if and when Ya change your mind to take them out.
 
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