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Some of you know that I recently had a new well drilled. The water is really nice but a little high in sodium, which I understand is common in our area from this aquifer. But most importantly, I don't like the taste of the coffee it makes straight from the well. So I decided to install a reverse osmosis system. I bought an iSpring from 123 Filter through Amazon. 123 Filter offers two filter changes for free (except for the membrane) if you shoot a narrated video of the installation. This is a $45.00 value so why not. So I thought I would share it with you guys. Oh, and the coffee tastes great, :coffee: .

 

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I have what looks like the same filtration system but from a different company. I would say you went the right way in getting one that uses the generic filters. I was looking at these systems from local hardware stores but I saw the replacement filter costs and that got me thinking. I went this route and it is much cheaper in the long run.

We are also on well and my family didn't like the water taste at first. Our well water wasn't bad, I have had some that was pretty rough. It was different. After a few weeks no one said anything anymore. A while back we were doing some remodel work in the kitchen so the fridge was disconnected which is our main source for the water. Everyone complained about the well water. I laughed and just pointed out how they complained about the RO water before. :mocking:

This reminds me. I should order some filters and change them out.

Actually on this. Do you use any whole house filtration? When I was plumbing in my system I was doing a bunch of plumbing work. I added the following.

First filter is a Rusco Spin-down Sediment Filter. Not sure it is this very model but I know they have several different connection options so I went with whatever worked for what I was installing.

https://www.amazon.com/Rusco-Vu-Flow-Sediment-Filter-System/dp/B018HFRYXA

Then a normal whole house filter.

Something like this one with a sediment filter.

https://www.amazon.com/DuPont-WFPF38001C-Universal-Valve-Filtration/dp/B007VZ2O2O

Then the water runs through the water softener and since I was ripping out all the copper from the house and installing PEX I went with a water distribution manifold like this.

https://www.amazon.com/Viega-50243-2-Inch-PureFlow-Manabloc/dp/B008J3TSH6

One of the taps off of this runs to the RO System.

Anyhow the prefilters are even cheaper than the RO filters and they help the RO filters last a bit longer. I would imagine the softener filters it a bit. Anything that the softener puts into the water the RO system pulls back out.

On the Spin-down filter I installed a few ball valves so I can reverse the flow of water through the filter. It has a ball dump valve at the bottom of the filter so once every few months I go down there. Shut off the water after the filter, reverse the flow through the Spin-down filter and open the drain valve for a second. This pushes any sediment that might have made it up to the screen off the screen and out the dump valve into a bucket. I have never replaced this filter. The carbon filter in the second filter I replace once every 2-3 months. My RO has been a couple years.
 

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I run the whole house through these two filters, they are 25 micron and 5 micron charcoal filter. I haven't checked them since I installed them on the new well but I'm guessing they are holding up okay, I'll probably check them in the next couple months.

Water Filters.jpg
 

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Yeah that will do the trick. My father's house is on city water and he noticed better filter life on his RO system by installing a pre-filter like one of these. I think he just installed it on the RO system and mentioned it to me. The charcoal filter was on the water system when we bought the house but I added the Spin-down because I was seeing some sediment in the charcoal filter. Not a lot but enough that it helps with the life of that filter. I was considering doing a setup like yours but went with the spin-down design instead since it doesn't need replacements nearly as often. Most of the sediment doesn't actually collect on the screen. Because the water spins as it enters the filter, most gets pushed to the outside. Once the flow stops it drops down to the trap in the bottom that gets flushed by opening the ball valve on the housing. I am pretty happy with it.
 

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We've had an RO system just like CL's except without the booster pump. Installed just about 10 years ago. We have community water and it's always about 60 psi, so no booster was recommended. We did install an in-line TDS (total dissolved solids) meter, which just gives me an indication of how well our RO system is operating. Incoming is usually over 200 ppm and RO is in the low 20's.

I guess great minds think alike, we also put ours in the basement so we didn't take up about half our space under the kitchen sink.:bigthumb:

It's funny about RO water ... at first it doesn't "taste right" but I believe that's because there no air in the water, it tastes kinda flat. But after we quickly got used to it, we don't notice it anymore, and we actually pack extra RO water when we go away for a weekend. Wife and I actually now prefer our RO water over any bottled water, and we know it is more pure than bottled water from who knows where.

We use RO for cooking, coffee and making ice cubes.

Our next refrigerator will probably have a water dispenser and ice maker, so we'll plumb RO water to it.

Just a note about RO systems, most will "waste" 3 gallons for every 1 gallon of RO water made. Not an issue really, but just something to consider.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Yeah, I've heard some systems will waste as much as 10 gallons, don't know if I believe it or is it hype from the distiller industry. This one of mine is rated at 3:1 waste to drinking water; I would like to test it sometime to see for sure. But extra water flowing through my well and septic are a good thing for most people that have them, especially in the winter for the septic system.
 

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I guess great minds think alike, we also put ours in the basement so we didn't take up about half our space under the kitchen sink.:bigthumb:
I didn't mention it but ours is in the basement as well. Our utility room with all the pump, pressure tank, whole house filters, water manifold is all in that room as well and it is right below the kitchen. Besides this way you can run your water to multiple places if you want. We don't have counter tops next to the sink to install it in. Also as you know the filter needs a place to dump water that is lost in the filtration process. That goes right into the laundry tub. We are going to be replacing cabinets and counter in the next couple years so I didn't bother with faucet at the sink but we will add one at some point. We just have the one in the fridge as mentioned. Oh and if you have that don't forget to get rid of the fridge filter. Most fridges come with a water filter but there is no point. I know many have a bypass plug you install in place of the filter. By doing that it will help with the flow rate from the fridge as well.
 

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Gauges

It is a good idea to install gauges before and after your filter assembly.
This way you will be able to see the true differential pressure across the filters and don’t change them prematurely and you can see if they are clogging in advance so that you have filters on hand.
Also installing a higher micron filter in front of everything will do most of the work for you and will be somewhat “sacrificial” in that changing this cheap filter out more often can help to reduce changing the more expensive higher micron rated filters.


Joe
 
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