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So have you seen the ads for the John Deere 1 Family Tractors? If you notice, the land where they are being uses is flat. There is good reason for that: They do not work well on hills of any size.

I have a 1025 that I first purchased to mow and haul around my 20 ac. farm. It has hills and the tractor could not pull the 48" mower up them. So I took it back for a larger tractor, a 3038E (see my review for that tractor).

Later on, I re-purchased this tractor, minus the front end loader, with a 54" snow thrower on the front. For this job it works fairly well. My driveway is 300' long and paved, so the blower works well. The driveway from end to roadway gains 26' of elevation over the 300'. Going up hill I get quite a bit of wheel spin on the steepest section, but overall, it does a good job. BTW the front tires are the ones spinning. As it already has quite a bit of weight on the front, I do not think more weight (i.e. wheel weights) will help. I have tire chains now, so next winter I'll try them.

Overall it's not a bad tractor, just do not expect much from it
 

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I have had a similar experience with the 1 series tractors. I had to upgrade to a 4 series when we moved to our farm in Tennessee. My first time in the pasture with the 1025R nearly ended in a roll over. It was an awesome machine for our 1 plus acre property in Pennsylvania, but just couldn't handle the terrain here in TN. Mostly due to the short wheelbase and small tires.
 

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You do not say if you purchased with r4 ot turfs. Turfs are worthless. I have done lots with my 1025r. Weights help imensly. If you bought the machine for a large acreage as a 3 series is large you should have bought that first. Not sure if you expect it to go up the hill in high on low idle but mine goes easily up a 30 degree hill. In 20 feet it is about 6 feet of elevation at mowing speed.

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I just saved myself the trouble and started with a 3520! :laugh::laugh:

When I first started looking at tractors, the first one I looked at was a 2305 (I think), then I looked at a 2520, then I bought the 3520. Oh well, it's only money. :flag_of_truce:
 

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I have no trouble at all getting my 1025R up a fairly steep part of my yard...as long as I am in Low. It struggles a little bit in High, but will still get up the hill.
 
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I have no trouble at all getting my 1025R up a fairly steep part of my yard...as long as I am in Low. It struggles a little bit in High, but will still get up the hill.
Ok, I just have to ask......

How does a 1025r TLB end up being named "Marshawn"? or a 1982 Yamaha Golf car named "Messy Marvin"? Must be a story we need to hear?

I have never given any equipment a specific name. I have on rare occasion called different pieces of equipment by various names, none of which can be posted here.

Well, there is one "piece of equipment" that an old girlfriend had a special name for but it has nothing to do with a tractor.......:mocking::laugh::lol: That was a LONG time ago.........
 

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Ok, I just have to ask......

How does a 1025r TLB end up being named "Marshawn"? or a 1982 Yamaha Golf car named "Messy Marvin"? Must be a story we need to hear?

I have never given any equipment a specific name. I have on rare occasion called different pieces of equipment by various names, none of which can be posted here.

Well, there is one "piece of equipment" that an old girlfriend had a special name for but it has nothing to do with a tractor.......:mocking::laugh::lol: That was a LONG time ago.........
When I first got the 1025, I was amazed at what it could do. Seemed like it could do anything...it is a beast.
Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch's nick name was Beast Mode. So it seemed only natural to name the 1025 "Marshawn".

The golf car, well it's 34 years old and it really is a mess. Duct tape on the seats, mud (wet and dry) all over the place. It is a mess. Hence "Messy Marvin". A close second place was "Pig Pen".
 

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From my garage out back to the road I have a a section with a 6% - 8% grade, the entire property is on a decent slope.
With FEL and BH attached, I've been relocating 150+ pound boulders with no issues. :dunno:
 

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So have you seen the ads for the John Deere 1 Family Tractors? If you notice, the land where they are being uses is flat. There is good reason for that: They do not work well on hills of any size.

I have a 1025 that I first purchased to mow and haul around my 20 ac. farm. It has hills and the tractor could not pull the 48" mower up them. So I took it back for a larger tractor, a 3038E (see my review for that tractor).

Later on, I re-purchased this tractor, minus the front end loader, with a 54" snow thrower on the front. For this job it works fairly well. My driveway is 300' long and paved, so the blower works well. The driveway from end to roadway gains 26' of elevation over the 300'. Going up hill I get quite a bit of wheel spin on the steepest section, but overall, it does a good job. BTW the front tires are the ones spinning. As it already has quite a bit of weight on the front, I do not think more weight (i.e. wheel weights) will help. I have tire chains now, so next winter I'll try them.

Overall it's not a bad tractor, just do not expect much from it
If you're using the snow blower in float mode for the steepest part of the driveway, you really don't have weight on the front tires beyond the normal weight of the tractor itself. Chains should help and you can also try lifting the snow thrower slightly to add more weight on the front if the tires are slipping.

I've never owned a tractor before my 1025R FILB so I didn't really know what to expect. But it seems every time I use the tractor I have to set my expectations bar a little bit higher because The 1025 always manages to exceed what I thought it could do.
 

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I plan on doing a review on my 1025r filb in the future too, when I get more time and experiences with it.
I was born in eastern Kentucky and all my family before me, except my dad, live there now. I live in Michigan now but if I lived in Kentucky I'd get the widest, flatest I could find with air bags and a parachute. Lol
Those are some hills.
Your statement "don't expect much" I hope is meaning....in the big hills or mountains because in Michigan brother this family one does a lot. I'll go over all the tasks that I use it for and how it performs when I do my review.
 

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I'll add that if your one of the billions of people out there that doesn't live in extreme conditions or are looking to use it as the main tractor in a commercial business like farming, excavating, landscaping etc. Then take a look at the one family tractors, they will amaze you in what they will accomplish.
Match your tractor to your situation and needs. Also your pocketbook. If your money challenged like me and your wanting a new Silverado, get the truck and one family when you can work it all out and you'll be one satisfied person when it's all said and done.
 

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The 1 series is basically an oversized heavy duty lawn tractor with the capabilities and attachments available to do alot of things you couldnt do with the average lawn tractor. Its not made or designed to be a heavy duty hill climber or full time farming tractor.
It is perfect for my needs with the bucket, forks, backhoe, box blade, snow blower, and plow.
I have 4.5 wooded acres and a long driveway. I dont expect it to do anymore than it is capable or designed to do. But unlike a lot of tractor buyers, i guess my 30 years running heavy equipment let me know this ahead of time.
Seems like maybe alot of salesmen don't really explain what should be expected in a lot of terrain situations. That and alot of buyers dont always understand the magnitude of what they think they are going to safely accomplish with such a small tractor. The price tag and diesel power seems to make people think they are getting alot more than what it really is.:dunno:
 

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Evaluating equipment must be done considering the design capabilities of the piece of equipment. Not necessarily what we want or think it should do.
Like any piece of equipment, many times we expect more out of the specific piece than what it was designed for and then when it doesn't do the things that it wasn't designed for, we get upset. I believe above all else, you have to first decided just what type of work it is that you want to be able to do with your tractor before you but it. Check the specs on the tractor! I.e. how much will the FEL lift, how much will the 3 point lift, what is the OEM ballasting requirements, why is the 3 point called a "Limited" category 1, etc., etc.

I.e. If you need to lift 1000 lb. with a set of forks on the FEL, then don't buy a 1025R. You are going to need a bigger tractor. The 1025R will only pick about 875 lb. at a 24" load center with a set of Artillian 36" forks, and even with 875 lbs., it will only lift it about 2'. The JD spec on the lifting capacity of the FEL is 512 lbs. so, at 875 lb., it will do more than the spec. Don't ask how I know this!! :good2: Another example, if you want to lift 3 point attachments that are over the 681 lb. lift spec at 24" behind the link arms, buy a larger tractor.

Also, proper ballasting is very important on any tractor but on the smaller sub-compacts it is very important because the static weight of the tractor is less than a larger tractor. So, if you hang an FEL on the front, proper rear ballasting is important. If you hang heavier attachments on the 3 point, you have to ballast the front end. If you don't ballast properly, you risk tilting the tractor forward, tilting the tractor rearward, rolling the tractor over and the one that is not considered is, you risk overloading the axles.

I use my 1025R to mow my lawn with a 60"MMM. The slope of my yard varies from 18 to 20 degrees of slope. With the rear tires filled, I can mow in any direction I want to. Up and down or across the slope. Concerning snow blowing. I have a 54" front mount snowblower. I also have a long sloped driveway. The sloped part of my driveway is approx. 200' long with a maximum 12 degree slope. Again, my back tires are filled, I use the JD ballast box that weighs 600 lb. and use tire chains on the rear tires. Without the chains, the end result is, the tractor will end up sliding down the slope. Trust me, I know!! :good2: With the chains, rock solid.
I have an older model 3 point mount JD MCS that I use in the fall to pick up leaves. When I use the MCS, I use a Heavy Hitch front weight bar https://heavyhitch.com/store/heavy-hitch-accessories/front-weight-bracket-for-lawn-garden-tractor/ with 8 - 40 LB. suitcase weights attached. Of course, if you choose, you could mount the FEL and that would ballast the MCS also. I personally don't like having the FEL hanging on the front of the tractor when doing mowing work. Just me :dunno:.

So, a fair evaluation of any equipment is, will it do what the piece of equipment is intended to do based on the equipment specs.
Honestly, a 1025R is a large garden tractor with a "big tractor style 3 point", a small FEL, and a small BH (if you bought it). So, you have to realize that it is only a small tractor. If you want to do bigger tractor work, then you have to buy a bigger tractor.

As small sub-compact tractors go, the 1025R is a pretty good tractor. For the average homeowner with several acres and light commercial (landscaping) work, they are a good tractor but even then, If you need to do heavier work, you may need a larger tractor. The 1025R, sub-compact size tractor is definitely not for everyone, it wasn't built for that.

Just my two cents :thumbup1gif:
 

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Good post Mr blue,
I'm starting to realize that rhetoric I read about I need bigger reminds me of people in Michigan that worry about getting a four wheel drive or all wheel drive to get to work in the city areas. The roads are plowed and salted pretty fast and if you ask them how many times they engaged the four wheel drive it is only a couple times. Some buy the four wheel drive to get to work in the winter and take the day off when we have a four inch snow. Lol
And the older you get I've seen the more fearful of situations you get. My dad would push snow with the bumper of his car driving somewhere....now if we get two inches he's shut up for a month. If you got the money buy a nine family to mow your field. I would. Lol
 

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Also Mr Ray, you need to consider how many times do I need a bigger tractor. Let's face it, money is the biggest obstacle in most people's lives. If a sub compact will do everything you need but a couple tasks then you might want to see what the cost of other options might be to get the couple tasks done. You might have a friend that bought to much tractor for what he's doing and can get hooked up. Lol
 

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If I was going to farm or work 20 acres or more I would have been thinking 3 series minimum prior to purchasing, most likely 4 or 5 series for the lifting capacity and reach and pto horsepower. :dunno:
 

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Evaluating equipment must be done considering the design capabilities of the piece of equipment. Not necessarily what we want or think it should do.

<snip>

As small sub-compact tractors go, the 1025R is a pretty good tractor. For the average homeowner with several acres and light commercial (landscaping) work, they are a good tractor but even then, If you need to do heavier work, you may need a larger tractor. The 1025R, sub-compact size tractor is definitely not for everyone, it wasn't built for that.

Just my two cents :thumbup1gif:
Yup.

I have a little over 2 acres. I thought I needed a little tractor to do all the landscape work My Dear Wife had planned for the Grandkids' Park. So I bought a little 1025r FILB. Since that purchase I have learned that in addition to landscaping chores the 1025r with a fork set is VERY handy and its small size allows me to use it like a fork lift in my barn.

Point is if it was big enough to lift some of the heavy stuff (1500#-2000#) I have asked of it, it would be too big to use for some of the other stuff I use it for.
 

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Hills? Here is a small one I operate all the time as far as mowing goes or doing whatever needs doing. I've cleaned brush out of there and done chipping there. Moved logs from there. Moved big rocks out of there. All done safely. I operate in low range and 4 wheel drive. I have all my tires loaded. I'd like to know what the problem is.
0827151206.jpg In this pic I have a bucket load of rock.
0827151159.jpg 0827151159c.jpg That's what the rock looks like.
I would drive up the hill and then back all the way down which is where the 2nd pic was taken. Yes you have to be careful but can it do the job? Yes it can. If you're having trouble maybe you should re-think what it is you're doing.
 

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Here's another smack in the face from reality. For those out there that are looking at buying a tractor, think about what you want to do and price the attachments. You might find that it will reach into the thousands of dollars. A tractor is just an engine with wheels that has capabilities. Those capabilities can't be realized unless you spend thousands of dollars more. Keep that in mind when your eyes are bigger than your stomach.
 

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Buying a tractor can be like selecting your spouse. Some will be so smitten with the new and exciting, they aren't necessarily considering their overall long term compatibility. But all of us who have been married for many years know you have to make compromises and be realistic with your expectations or you are likely to end up disappointed and unhappy which is good for no one. Divorcing a spouse is expensive just like trading a recently bought tractor, you take a big financial hit and emotionally it's a rough experience.

Just for clarity, I am not comparing my wife nor anyone else's to a tractor or piece of machinery.
It's about realistic expectations and suitability.:good2:


Buying a tractor is just like any other purchase of a piece of equipment. It must be suited to the task at hand and it is best to be realistic about the machine's capabilities.

I wrote a detailed summary of how to buy an open trailer for hauling your tractor yesterday in another thread here on GTT. Just because a tractor will physically fit on a trailer, it doesn't mean the trailer can safely carry the tractor. It also doesn't mean the tow vehicle can safely tow the trailer loaded with the tractor. You must buy the trailer which is rated to carry much more than the weight for your intended use. Your intended tow vehicle MUST be able to safely pull the load. Just because the tractor "fits" on the trailer and the trailer "attaches" to the tow vehicle, doesn't mean it's the correct or safe setup.

Numerous people buy equipment at the John Deere dealers which are improperly sized for their tasks. I blame the majority of these improper purchases on the sales person. Most people buying a 1 series tractor have never owned a "tractor" before. Many have owned "garden tractors" or other "lawn mowers" and while the 1 series will mow, it will also do a wide variety of other functions.

My current tractor has a 60" deck on it. While I recently had it torn down for some repairs, my neighbor very generously offered his D140 John Deere lawn mower for me to use. While the D140 will mow my 2 acres plus and my property is similar in size to my neighbors, my diesel with the 60" deck and power steering makes the tasks so much less time consuming and the larger size of my tractor makes it much more comfortable. Both machines will mow, it's just that one does it so much better than the other. But the D140 is priced at what the mower deck alone costs on a 1 series so you must keep things in perspective.

John Deere offers a wide array of equipment to meet virtually every possible customers need. I have seen 3 or 4 of the 1 series tractors for sale with limited hours and the one I looked at, the guy had bought it to mow a yard which is probably 10,000 sq feet in total size, so it is less than 1/4th of an acre. He found the 1 series was too large for his needs. SO he spent $18,000 on a tractor, FEL and MMM when he could have spent half that or less and had a very capable machine.

The flip side is someone who would think that the 1 series is suited to maintain an entire 20 acre property. While the 1 series can certainly do it, it's not the most efficient nor safest suited machine to the tasks. When you never use a machines full capabilities, you are less likely to have either an accident or injury or damage to the equipment. On the flip side, when you are routinely pushing a machine beyond it's intended capabilities, your odds of having either an accident or damaging the machine are much, much greater.

You also have to fully learn how to use a machines capabilities. It takes time and experience and there is no substitution for either. There was a thread on GTT about a guy who got his 1 series stuck in his yard. he didn't have any rear ballast nor did he know how to use his FEL to "unstick" himself. Very Experienced machine operators know how to use a FE Loader to "Pull or Push" yourself out of a stuck situation. It's just a function of learning how to fully use the machine and it's capabilities.

Buyers need to be realisitc in sizing their machines to the tasks at hand. Many buyers are financially constrained. Some salespeople don't know how to help the customer obtain the right piece of machinery. There is enough "blame" to go around and that is why the GTT site can be so helpful to those who seek advice and actually follow it. Occasionally there will be the person who asks for advice and then either ignores it or disputes it or debates it without actual experience. Hey, it's part of what makes our world go around.................:dunno:

Watching someone who is a true professional operate a piece of machinery which they use every single day can be a thing of beauty. The precision and smoothness of their operational skills is truly impressive. It is also the reason why when you need a serious surgery, you want the surgeon who does it every single day and is extremely proficient in the process. You certainly don't want the surgeon who says "I think I can figure it out if I read the manual and watch some You Tube Video's." But we all have to learn at some point.:laugh:
 
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