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Source: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7529603/World-War-II-era-bomber-plane-crashes-Connecticut.html


At least seven people have died and seven others are injured after a World War II-era bomber plane crashed and burst into flames shortly after take-off at Connecticut's Bradley International Airport.
The B-17G Flying Fortress plane, dubbed 'Nine-o-Nine', went down on Wednesday morning just outside Hartford when it was trying to land on the runway.
State Police Commissioner confirmed there were fatalities. He added: 'Victims are very difficult to identify, we don't want to make a mistake.'
Sources told the Hartford Courant that at least seven people were dead.
Officials said 13 people were on board, including two pilots and one attendant.
Ten of the people were passengers, including two who were Connecticut firefighters. Another person on the ground was injured when the plane slid off the runway and slammed into a building used to house the airport's deicing equipment.
The flight took off at 9.45am, after waiting a few minutes for turbulance before it was cleared for take-off, according to FAA air traffic control audio recorded by LiveATC.net.
Shortly after take-off, the pilot is heard saying: 'N93012 would like to return to the field.'
The controller then asks: 'What's the reason for coming back?'
'You got number four engine. We'd like to return and blow it out,' another pilot answered.
The air control tower then responds, saying: 'N93012 Roger. You can proceed onto the downwind for runway six. And you said you needed an immediate landing?'
And the pilot responds: 'When you get a chance, yeah.'
 

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This plane (and others) used to come to our local airport every year with the Collings Foundation, we (the family and I) have walked through this plane a few times.

Here is one of my better pics of ol' Nine-O-Nine, she was a beauty. RIP to the seven souls who lost their lives.
 

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There's nothing about this to "like."

My heart goes out to the families who lost their loved ones and to the Aviation community who lost a proud veteran of WWII. Not many B17s left today.
 

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Very sad to read and hear! My thoughts and prayers to the families involved!

I watched Nine-O-Nine land at the Beaver County Airport on that August day in '87! I live not too far from the airport. I didn't get to actually see it all crumpled down over the embankment, but when it kept rolling you knew it was in bad trouble! I also watched it's flight out of the airport in 1990 after being restored! I've always had a love for WWII aircraft! I don't have video or pictures! Sometimes ( like when I railfan) it's a much better experience to just watch and listen! I think back and maybe second guess doing that, but it'll always be there as memories!
 

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Sad, Sad news,,,may they RIP
 

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It will be interesting to hear what actually caused the crash. None of that dialog really makes sense.
The B17 should have been able to land with 1 engine down and the other 3 full of bullet holes!
Of course the old girl is close to 80 years old.
 

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It will be interesting to hear what actually caused the crash. None of that dialog really makes sense.
The B17 should have been able to land with 1 engine down and the other 3 full of bullet holes!
Of course the old girl is close to 80 years old.
That depends on who was flying it.

Sorry to hear of the loss of lives.
 

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Yup, real sad deal. Hard to figure how it ended up in the de-ice pit area which was 90 degrees to the intended runway 6. Unless he came in way to slow and gunned all engines, where in the #1 & #2 engine would have pulled it hard right, considering #4 engine was out. NTSB will have a difficult time piecing this one back together.
 

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B17 prop missing.jpg
This was 9 Yanks and a Rebel, a B17 on Feb 6, 1944

B17 tail damage.jpg
This was 9 Yanks and a Rebel, a B17 on Jan 11, 1944.

My Grandfather was the top turret gunner and the Pilot Lt. Hahn brought them home safely.

I took him to see the Memphis Belle and offered to go up with him. He declined. He said he spent enough time up in one of them.
 

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What a tragedy this was, 7 people and an irreplaceable piece of history lost.

Maybe they should start grounding these old birds before they're all gone...
 

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saw this on the news tonight. sorry to hear of the loss too. RIP:pray:

i watched them interview the wife of the one fella-and she said he died loving what he did.
 

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Sad loss and prayers to those families. Sad to see old girl gone.
 

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Very sad to see. This happened in my home state. They were just at Waterbury-Oxford airport back in September. Flying over my house often. Many years of seeing them. RIP to those lost enjoying their love of the machines history.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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It will be interesting to hear what actually caused the crash. None of that dialog really makes sense.
The B17 should have been able to land with 1 engine down and the other 3 full of bullet holes!
Of course the old girl is close to 80 years old.
I was kind of thinking the same thing. The problem though is that it is different when you are coming in for a landing from altitude vs trying to gain altitude.

Two things you never want to be doing in a plane at the same time is flying low and slow. While one would think that with a relatively light load it should have been able to sustain flight short an engine but depending on what phase of flight the failure happened, it can be an issue. From what early reports I have seen, they would still be low and slow. Keep in mind these engines are around 80 years old. So they are likely not outputting the power they once did which would further complicate things. Had the failure happened at altitude, it wouldn't likely have caused any major issue. You can always trade altitude for speed but when you have neither you have fewer options.

The engines are not the originals so who knows the age but I am sure they were maintained. I saw a video last night on youtube where they went over the history of this airframe for a bit. It was most likely built in 1944, and was produced too late to be in the war. It was mothballed for several years and stripped of most of the parts and nearly scrapped at one point. It flew as a aerial firefighter for a while before being ultimately restored. I don't recall the exact chronological order but that is a rough history. I know in one of the photos it wasn't much left of the plane and had no engines.

I feel terrible for the loss of life and the loss of the history. I want to say it was mentioned that there were 18 B17s registered as being flown before this crash. When I was a kid I remember one at an air show my father took me to. It was my favorite plane from that point on from that era. No idea which one I was on. I don't think it was this one based on when I saw it was restored. Unless it was on one of the first flights but if I were to guess it was a year or two before the restoration was done on this one.
 

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I was kind of thinking the same thing. The problem though is that it is different when you are coming in for a landing from altitude vs trying to gain altitude.

Two things you never want to be doing in a plane at the same time is flying low and slow. While one would think that with a relatively light load it should have been able to sustain flight short an engine but depending on what phase of flight the failure happened, it can be an issue. From what early reports I have seen, they would still be low and slow. Keep in mind these engines are around 80 years old. So they are likely not outputting the power they once did which would further complicate things. Had the failure happened at altitude, it wouldn't likely have caused any major issue. You can always trade altitude for speed but when you have neither you have fewer options.

The engines are not the originals so who knows the age but I am sure they were maintained. I saw a video last night on youtube where they went over the history of this airframe for a bit. It was most likely built in 1944, and was produced too late to be in the war. It was mothballed for several years and stripped of most of the parts and nearly scrapped at one point. It flew as a aerial firefighter for a while before being ultimately restored. I don't recall the exact chronological order but that is a rough history. I know in one of the photos it wasn't much left of the plane and had no engines.

I feel terrible for the loss of life and the loss of the history. I want to say it was mentioned that there were 18 B17s registered as being flown before this crash. When I was a kid I remember one at an air show my father took me to. It was my favorite plane from that point on from that era. No idea which one I was on. I don't think it was this one based on when I saw it was restored. Unless it was on one of the first flights but if I were to guess it was a year or two before the restoration was done on this one.
They would be able to climb on 3 engines. I was thinking an engine fire maybe, but it just didn’t seem to urgent given “yeah when you get a chance” comment.
 

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They would be able to climb on 3 engines. I was thinking an engine fire maybe, but it just didn’t seem to urgent given “yeah when you get a chance” comment.
Hard to say, technically I would agree they should be able to but they were probably dirty (flaps and gear down). Probably not going to try and raise them just to put them back down. Witnesses commenting on very low altitude. Makes me think they were having problems climbing but they may just saw a plane doing something they were not used to. I agree they didn't seem to have a sense of urgency. I also agree that they should have been able to gain altitude even on three as designed. Just not sure how much power these engines have lost over the years. There was the comment about "coming back to blow out an engine". What does that mean? Blow out a fire? I would think there would be more urgency. Does blow out an engine mean something different in the radial world? There was reports of smoke. It sounds like from reports that they did touchdown before veering off into the deicing facility. Did they loose a tire which could have caused an abrupt turn? There would be evidence to that being a contributing factor if it did happen.

At this point we just don't have enough information.
 

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Just curious, with the two pilots, an attendant and 10 passengers, would they have been on some type of promotional flight or how would they have been using the plane? Also, any idea if it was owned by a historical group or museum or individual(s)?

Also curious if any of the reports indicated their destination, etc? Wondering if the plane operated out of that airport or was just passing through the area.......Trying to visualize if this was a typical thing for this plane to be flying groups of passengers and what they were doing with the plane on that fateful day.

Terrible loss of life and an American aviation hero.......

It's also interesting how often real news stories of interest are found on The Daily Mail, which is a UK based news site.......I often find more of interest on the Daily mail verses many of the other alleged news sites.....
 

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Just curious, with the two pilots, an attendant and 10 passengers, would they have been on some type of promotional flight or how would they have been using the plane? Also, any idea if it was owned by a historical group or museum or individual(s)?

Also curious if any of the reports indicated their destination, etc? Wondering if the plane operated out of that airport or was just passing through the area.......Trying to visualize if this was a typical thing for this plane to be flying groups of passengers and what they were doing with the plane on that fateful day.

Terrible loss of life and an American aviation hero.......
They were giving rides to paying customers. One of those deals where you pay $450 to go up for a 30 min flight around the area and come back. It was owend by the Collings Foundation

Collings Foundation
 

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This is very sad and a huge loss. I've toured a couple of B-17s on the ground, but never ponied up the $$$$ to do a flight. I've crawled up into the nose cone / bombardier's position on one. WOW! Even on the ground it was a surreal experience. I tried to think what it would have been like at 30,000 feet with flack all over the place and Messerschmits coming at you - all while you're supposed to be concentrating on acquiring a target. Those guys had brass testicles that were the size of bowling balls! God bless 'em all!!
:usa


I was able to go up in a Ford Tri-Motor owned and operated by the EAA. I was a member then and also paid a few bucks extra to put my dad in the right seat (co-pilot's position) on that flight. It was something I'll never forget.


===========================

What a tragedy this was, 7 people and an irreplaceable piece of history lost.

Maybe they should start grounding these old birds before they're all gone...
ABSOLUTELY NOT!! There are enough of these on static display in museums. It's important to get these out to the public so they can see and appreciate history. They are truly a sight to see and hear.

The FAA will investigate this tragedy and (hopefully) figure out what went wrong. It's going to be a multi-year investigation and the Collings Foundation will (I'm sure) co-operate fully with them. The last thing that they want to see is a crash like this. The FAA already has a ton of regulations in place for any plane that carries passengers. Yes, the rules for sightseeing flights are different than the rules for scheduled passenger flights, but there's still a lot of inspections that take place. EVERYTHING in aviation is documented and I'm sure that the Collings Foundation has followed the rules.

While I'm saddened for the victims and their families, you don't see people calling for stopping buses from being on the road when one of those crashes. We shouldn't do that for aviation either. The reason that plane crashes are "news" is because they're pretty rare.

Not to get political, but I saw CT Senator Richard Blumenthal getting in front of a TV camera the night this happened saying that everything should be immediately grounded. He got his 9 seconds of fame and I haven't seen him since. Of course, this is the same guy that mentioned his service in Vietnam... when he NEVER served in Vietnam! :nunu:


I will apologize to you, AJgrn78, if my tone is harsh or sarcastic. I'm not trying to be that way. I used to be heavily involved and interested in aviation and this is a subject that I care about.
 
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