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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Got between a rock and a hard place Sunday afternoon. I was removing my wife's clothesline structure that I put in back in the 80's. I got too close to the post as I was trying to lift it up. The bucket dug in and chain got tight. The pole was raised and 2.5' or so was still in the ground and would not go back down. Pushed, pulled and when I got off to look I saw this:
IMG_0528.jpg

Nothing broke me loose except removing what hook bolt I could and then cutting the thread of the remaining bolt.
IMG_0529.jpg

That worked. I see no way to totally fix the bucket :unknown: and order a new one seems to be in my future.

Don't do like I did. :banghead:

Thoughts anyone? :unknown:

The first picture is what I first observed, the damage was already done, I just had to get loose.
 

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Catch the pole closer to the ground next time?

Bummer, hate that happened to you.
 

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bent bucket

Gee wiz now ur starting to have murphy's law problems like me, can u heat that up and straighten it out, and then add a bolt on cutting edge to make bottom ridged again, may be cheaper then a new bucket! good luck big jim
 

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Gee wiz now ur starting to have murphy's law problems like me, can u heat that up and straighten it out, and then add a bolt on cutting edge to make bottom ridged again, may be cheaper then a new bucket! good luck big jim
I would definately go this route, or at least try to.

Get some quotes from local welding and fab shops to repair the bucket and perhaps weld on a hardened cutting edge. Shouldn't be that painful, certainly less than a new bucket.

Curious, did you consider cutting the post by hand and if you weren't able to release it that way, pounding the post free from its bind betwixt bucket and chain?
 

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I'd find a fabrication shop or machine shop that has a two post press big enough to slide the bucket through sideways, and see if they would straighten it. The cutting/scraping edge is the strongest part of the bucket, get it flat/straight and the rest will be straight.

Next time you try to pull something out of the ground, curl the bucket all the way down as far as it goes, forget the hooks on the bucket, wrap the chain around the round tube behind the bucket, wrap it with a heavy blanket if you don't want scratches in the paint. Park with the bucket on the ground and right in front of the post/pole. Wrap the chain around the post/pole three times and hook the chain up with a foot of slack. Lift with the loader arms, not by curling the bucket.
 

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Guess Kenny needs to call you when he needs something BETA tested from now on.:lol:
 

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You can get in trouble quick..........

Just wondering why you didn't cut the post vs. the hooks?
 

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WOW! I agree with taking to a local shop, they should be able to straighten that for you.
 

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You can straighten that lower bucket edge fairly easy. You might find a big boulder. Get the bucket centered and dig under it. Then curl up to relieve the bow.

You could clamp a small I-beam under the lower edge and alternately draw the bowed section into place by drawing the c-clamps down.

Find a sturdy tree somewhere. Engage the bucket lower edge and curl it up to relieve the bow.

Been there. Done that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You can get in trouble quick..........

Just wondering why you didn't cut the post vs. the hooks?
With my first look at the problem the damage was already done.:banghead:
 

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I too would have cut the post. Chain saw would barely get warmed up.

Cut the post the width of your bucket. Put it across the top on the inside. Hydraulic jack from post to high point of buck lower edge.
 

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Wow, that's bent. Don't feel bad, we all wreck something sometime. :empathy:

You'll have to bend it back beyond flat to get it to end up straight. I think the suggestion of bending and then adding a bolt on toothbar or cutting edge is a great one, how exact you want it to be repaired will dictate how to fix it. A shop with a large press would be the most accurate, but you could hang the edge under something immobile and curl it as well. May not be as exact, but you can get it pretty close. A hydraulic jack or portapower as suggested would be a good option also, actually probably better than trying to get it in a big press.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Wow, that's bent. Don't feel bad, we all wreck something sometime. :empathy:

You'll have to bend it back beyond flat to get it to end up straight. I think the suggestion of bending and then adding a bolt on toothbar or cutting edge is a great one, how exact you want it to be repaired will dictate how to fix it. A shop with a large press would be the most accurate, but you could hang the edge under something immobile and curl it as well. May not be as exact, but you can get it pretty close. A hydraulic jack or portapower as suggested would be a good option also, actually probably better than trying to get it in a big press.
Your post and several others give me an idea of: a) catching the edge of something fairly immoveable object like a sidewalk or driveway edge, and curling the bucket slowly. . . . or b) hooking a chain to the bucket going out the rear and then to a tree or maybe the three point (?) and curling up. Thoughts . . . . :unknown:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Bring it on over to my house, I can have it straightened in a afternoon. It will definitely have more scratches when I get done!
Well earned scratches . . . . :laugh::laugh:
 

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The chain isn't a bad idea, but the more I think about it I suspect the tractor will go into hydraulic relief before it bends the bucket back straight. There was some mechanical force as well as hydraulic required to bend it the first time, and I don't think hydraulic force alone (from the tractor) will be enough to get it straight. It very well might, but I like the jack/ portapower idea a little more.
 

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I don't think I'd jack it from the upper edge of the bucket. You may buckle the top as well. The lower edge is thicker material and also reinforced with the cutting edge.

Don't use a sidewalk or driveway edge or you'll end up making more work for yourself and lastly, "No more chains for you!" :nunu:
 

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That sucks.

But how 'bout them hooks! Nothing weak there. Good job Kenny!:good2:
 
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