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It puts extra stress on the drivetrain that it's not engineered for.
It is also most likely why they removed all reference to moving wheel position with R1 Rears from 3 Series Owners Manual. Wheel position change will impart the same stresses as spacers, that being said a lot of dealers will still put spacers on 3Rs. Personally I'd rather have spacers to help prevent rollover which is much more likely to happen and can be seen by tons of examples as opposed to potential rear axle problem which I haven't seen any mention of real world example in any forums.
 

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It is also most likely why they removed all reference to moving wheel position with R1 Rears from 3 Series Owners Manual. Wheel position change will impart the same stresses as spacers, that being said a lot of dealers will still put spacers on 3Rs. Personally I'd rather have spacers to help prevent rollover which is much more likely to happen and can be seen by tons of examples as opposed to potential rear axle problem which I haven't seen any mention of real world example in any forums.
That rear wheel stress on a 3 series will be determined by the load on the 3pt hitch. If you only handle light light loads on the 3pt, it would not likely be a problem. In my case, on my 4066R, I run a 1750# 3pt 10ft rhino brush hog and that would definitely put a load on anything.
 

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The above comments make sense but with Deere advising NO spacers on the 3 series how are you going to 'splain to Deere why the axle or bearings or inner gears or aluminum case failed and you are expecting a warranty coverage for the failure?

In my case, I'm wayyy out of warranty so adding spacers to mine means I am accepting the risk of a very expensive repair depending on the damage. I'm not stirring the pot here just playing devil's advocate and attempting to glean some quality guidance for those like myself that would like to access a bit more stability without the risk of damaging the machine.

It's a catch 22. Space the rears and improve the safety while risking damage to the whole drivetrain as mentioned above or follow Mother Deere's guidelines to not space the 3R rears thus avoiding potential damage to the drivetrain and the costly repair but risk rolling the thing which will also cause damage and potential injury or death? :unsure: :unsure:
 

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Is the housing of the larger 3 machines aluminum? For some reason, I thought the R's were cast steel.
There's the reason right there, if it's aluminum. Deere knows they're weak, and doesn't want to risk the liability or warranty claims by backing the use of spacers, or adjustable width R1's. Holy cow, that is pathetic!
 

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Is the housing of the larger 3 machines aluminum? For some reason, I thought the R's were cast steel.
There's the reason right there, if it's aluminum. Deere knows they're weak, and doesn't want to risk the liability or warranty claims by backing the use of spacers, or adjustable width R1's. Holy cow, that is pathetic!
To my knowledge you have to get into the 4 series to get out of the aluminum rear ends.


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Glad you didn’t get hurt in the roll over. By chance were you running in 4-wheel drive? I mow a steep slope with my 1025R and always run in 4-wheel drive. My thought process is if I’m in 2 wheel drive as soon as a rear wheel lifts your stopped and can’t drive out of the problem so the problem wins. Also if I feel an unstable condition I immediately turn the front end down the slope, if you’re in 2 wheel drive you can’t do that. I’ve got a canopy mounted to the roll bar so it definitely has a higher center of gravity and is a cause for concern.
Again, I’m glad you weren’t hurt.
 

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Having it in 4wd also allows the front wheels to brake since they're mechanically connected to the back where the brake is.
 

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My experience is that the loader raises the center of gravity quite a bit. Especially if you are running it raised very much at all. I never, never, ever do any type of 3 point hitch work with a loader on. That thing is a rollover waiting to happen. It's also a huge vision obstacle. It's why I got the single point connection. I can take mine off in 5 minutes and do so daily when I'm using my tractor.
I never, never, ever take my FEL off when using 3 PH mostly because most attachments on the 3 PH are low to the ground and recommended for ballast too.
Attention to rear wheel spacing, ballast weight, slope, and FEL height are important to keep the 4 wheels on the ground.
 

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I do not wish to hijack the thread but since spacers have been brought up a few times, does anyone know exactly why John Deere suggests that spacers NOT be used on the 3R machines?
I added 3" spacers on the rear axle, and don't care what JD suggests.. I did it for me, and the 4300 feels so much more stable in the woods and when mowing slopes for the past 10 years that I'm glad I didn't care. Not a newer series R, but still would do it. The first 10 yrs with the 4300 were much more dicey without the spacers. Better on all 4 wheels.

So if it ruins the warranty, but saves a tip on its side or a "roll over" (which the OP's wasn't a "roll over"), I'll take the "save", and the chance that the spacer ruins any warranty issue. Only money vs. life or limb, IMO.
 

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It's a catch 22. Space the rears and improve the safety while risking damage to the whole drivetrain as mentioned above or follow Mother Deere's guidelines to not space the 3R rears thus avoiding potential damage to the drivetrain and the costly repair but risk rolling the thing which will also cause damage and potential injury or death?
Yes the 3R's rear end is aluminum.

At some point Deere stopped recommending spacers for the rear after they did some testing.

I am thinking that the tests they did were at the extremes of the operating capacity of the tractor and a worst case scenario.

Yes if you choose to widen the rear end of a 3R you might add some additional wear, but how often do you operate at the full capacity of the machine and on what type of terrain do you do this?

I am of the mindset that if you choose to widen the rear and do it reasonably and operate it with some common sense, you'll likely never notice the additional wear.

Yes you are taking a risk of machine damage by widening the rear axle. You are also taking a chance of machine damage and personal injury if you roll the tractor.

You also have a third choice, buy a different machine.

The forth choice is to not operate the machine anywhere other than a low risk area.

Each of us have to make the decision we feel works best for us.
 

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I'm going to order a digital two axis inclinometer to install on top of the dash of my 4066.
It's stupid to be guessing about the slope angles, many off road vehicle types available
and they're not that expensive, some even have settable warning alerts.
Perhaps you can share you're research and recommendations with us. It sounds like a lot of us are thinking the same thoughts. Thank You GTT!!!
 

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I never, never, ever take my FEL off when using 3 PH mostly because most attachments on the 3 PH are low to the ground and recommended for ballast too.
Attention to rear wheel spacing, ballast weight, slope, and FEL height are important to keep the 4 wheels on the ground.
Having something attached to the 3 PH while doing loader work is an entirely different topic that I agree with completely. My point was the danger in having the loader attached to the front of the tractor with the bucket or grapple on and raised higher than the front axle. That coupled with the vision problem of having the loader on and not being able to see in front is reason enough for me to take it off. But it's very telling when most of the rollover or layover pics you see include a loader.
 

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I really do love my Deere but at times I wonder what some over educated person was thinking when trying to design a real "Working Tractor". With that I mean if you put a diesel motor in a machine it's now meant to be worked at another level. I like a lot of you folks would love to have some real world input on design so roll overs are less likely. Please stay safe!
 

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I really do love my Deere but at times I wonder what some over educated person was thinking when trying to design a real "Working Tractor". With that I mean if you put a diesel motor in a machine it's now meant to be worked at another level. I like a lot of you folks would love to have some real world input on design so roll overs are less likely. Please stay safe!
I am of the opinion they did exactly this with the newer large frame 2R series. They still have relatively modest 2-series lift capacities, but the machines got longer, wider, heavier, and beefier rear ends to make them more stable and durable for what they are. Less likely to roll or break something when working within their abilities.

I think they went a little too far in making the 3R compact, and wouldn't be surprised if Deere did the same footprint increase to the 3R whenever they finally make updates.
 

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Perhaps you can share you're research and recommendations with us. It sounds like a lot of us are thinking the same thoughts. Thank You GTT!!!
Knowledge is good but unless you are going extremely slow, use a gauge with a lot of caution. Say you carefully measure your tractor on various slopes and 22 degrees is the max. You then drive on a 20 degree slope and feel safe until a wheel drops into a dip you didn't see. Suddenly that 20 degree slope is much more and over you go. .

You could actually measure the COG of your tractor- might take quite a setup but could be done. Unfortunately you can't map all the places your tractor might go.

Treefarmer
 

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Discussion Starter · #118 ·
The Tractor is still sitting waiting for the dealer to pick it up. I have tried to turn it over a few times over the last week and a half and it is still frozen up.

My dealer has several trucks and trailers but only two that have winches that can load a tractor. One is a semi-low boy, and because of my location that would not work. The other is a gooseneck. They just got a new truck to pull the gooseneck and it is still in the shop getting the flatbed fitted. Hopefully the will be out here to pick it up on Friday.

I will update you as soon as I have more info.
 

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I purchased a set of used 6" aluminum spacers I'll install on my 3046r at some point after they arrive but it also took me about 3 years to install the upgraded spring in my 2720 4wd.
I'm thinking it cant be any worse than the weight of a backhoe on the rear.
 
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