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Discussion Starter #1
Moving gravel today for new basement. Rear tire got into a rut while turning. If it was closer to edge it would have been a 9' drop onto rebar. ImageUploadedByTapatalk1442963769.887698.jpg ImageUploadedByTapatalk1442963784.545284.jpg ImageUploadedByTapatalk1442963799.002288.jpg


Sent from the mountains
 

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Are you ok? The tractor is repairable, even replaceable if needed. (That doesn't seem to the case here.) But just wanted to make sure you made it out ok.


Thanks for sharing this with everyone. It's important to share real-life experiences that actually relate to other operators/owners to bring it to reality.
 

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Hope you're OK!
 

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Wow.....glad you're here to tell us about it.
 

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It can and does happen.

If you can give us an injury and damage update would be good. As was said, hope you are okay.
 

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Glad to hear your OK. Shame about the tractor ,but it can be repaired or replaced..

Lets us know what's going on .

Also glad to hear you had your seatbelt on and the ROPS worked.
 

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Along with sufficient ballast!
Don't know what took place and wasn't there , just a few thoughts .
Seeing the fel high on the photos if that helped. Maybe the rear 3pt was high with weight on the rear ,that could have helped.

As I stated before main thing he is safe, Thank goodness for seatbelt and ROPS.
 

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There was a little more detail in his TBN thread (along with way more people telling him this was all his fault and he would have been better off without the ROPS and seatbelt!). He dropped a rear tire into a soft spot, possible while turning slowly. His rear ballast consisted of a big rock held in that scoop arrangement on the 3PH and might not have been as well restrained side to side as he thought. That really might be the whole deal right there. If the rut was just deep enough to get the rock in the scoop to slide to the low side, the impact of the rock hitting the edge of the scoop could have been enough to knock the opposite rear wheel off the ground. Once a rear wheel is up, the front end is just going to let you go right on over, especially if that ballast rock kept shifting to the low side.


Thing to focus on though? Use the ROPS and seatbelt as designed. Yes, even on a surface you think is flat.
 

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I hope you are OK. Tell us more what happen. It looks like your gravel was packing and causing a dip.
 

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I want to re-emphasize that we are all glad the OP was not injured.

He doesn't say if his rear tires are liquid filled but we can see there are no iron wheel weights.

Assuming his tires ARE liquid filled, then per the H120 manual that rock would need to weigh a MINIMUM of 601 lbs.
 

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There was a little more detail in his TBN thread (along with way more people telling him this was all his fault and he would have been better off without the ROPS and seatbelt!).
That is why I'm here on GTT. I have to wonder how those people manage to get through life.

Thanks for the post Tnman. I'm sure ALL here on GTT recognize the full/real worth of a post such as this.
 

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There was a little more detail in his TBN thread (along with way more people telling him this was all his fault and he would have been better off without the ROPS and seatbelt!). He dropped a rear tire into a soft spot, possible while turning slowly. His rear ballast consisted of a big rock held in that scoop arrangement on the 3PH and might not have been as well restrained side to side as he thought. That really might be the whole deal right there. If the rut was just deep enough to get the rock in the scoop to slide to the low side, the impact of the rock hitting the edge of the scoop could have been enough to knock the opposite rear wheel off the ground. Once a rear wheel is up, the front end is just going to let you go right on over, especially if that ballast rock kept shifting to the low side.


Thing to focus on though? Use the ROPS and seatbelt as designed. Yes, even on a surface you think is flat.
True if rock slid in the scoop that would have helped with his rear tire hitting a soft spot. But if FEL is at hood level or above ,when the rock moved , hitting the soft spot, over it goes.

But as others have stated, rear ballast is most important when doing any work. Using Common Sense, slow speeds, keeping the bucket low to ground. Keeping a hand on or very close to the fel lever ,if you need to lower the fel you can quickly. Yes wearing seat belt (IMO) was a good start but common sense just hadn't kicked in YET. Sorry just my thoughts.
 

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Looking over at the thread on the other site, I'm amazed at how many seem to think that it's better to try and jump off the tractor or that you never need to worry about rolling a tractor on flat ground.

Glad the OP is safe.
 

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Jumping clear of a rolling machine is flipping crazy. (No pun intended.) Sure, it's the better solution if your machine is rolling and you don't have a seatbelt or ROPS, but by a seriously distant second. Call me crazy, but I'll take the engineered safe route and use my belt and ROPS up where it'll save my hide. :thumbup1gif:
 

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That is why I'm here on GTT. I have to wonder how those people manage to get through life.

Thanks for the post Tnman. I'm sure ALL here on GTT recognize the full/real worth of a post such as this.
SO true...I can only tolerate TBN in small doses. It just goes to show that any moron can buy a tractor and a computer. We buy green tractors and computers.
 

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The good:

ROPS was up
Seatbelt used
You lived to tell the tale.

The bad:

Looks like you were carrying the bucket way too high
Looks like the implement on the 3pt hitch was also way too high
Not enough rear ballast
Turning with bucket too high.

I am not sure if you were going forward or reverse, or how fast.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Sorry for the delayed reply. Yes bucket Was too high. Higher than I thought till I looked at pic. I was in process of lowering it as I started to back up turning to the left. Left rear tire "drooped" into a hole/rut. That was all she wrote. Nothing was going to stop it quick enough. Rear ballast was a little high too to keep from digging into ground while backing. The boulder didn't move but the whole scoop did have some movement on the 3pt hitch. Tightening the turn buckles more would have helped that. Tires aren't filled "yet" but will be. 1.5 " rear wheel spacers are also on the agenda, mainly for mowing on hills.
I'm glad to say I was not hurt in the slightest. ROPS & belt worked perfectly. Only damage was a broken light flasher lens and bruised ego. It was a runaway diesel after I shut key off. Died in about 20sec in a cloud of smoke. Took 30 min after turning back over before starter would turn it over. I'll also add it took several min to get seat belt unlatched. Something to cut belt near the buckle latch is a good idea, especially if water is involved.
Finished spreading & leveling the 10" gravel in the 26x38 basement and removed the gravel ramp next day without any problems.
Lessons learned!


Sent from the mountains
 

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Super happy to hear that you're 100%!! And, MANY THANKS for posting this!!

Interesting to hear that your boulder-ballast stayed put. I was wondering about that. But the boulder could have been bad news as well. If you were on a slope there might have been a chance that it could have rolled out of the scoop and towards the operator. Glad that didn't happen. Are you going to go with a more "traditional" form of ballast in the future?

Great point about how long it took you to get your seatbelt off. I would have never thought about that. I think this makes a good case to get one (or maybe two) of those "seatbelt cutters" and fasten it to the ROPS where it could be quickly reached in an emergency.

After reading the posts here, I also read through the thread you started on TBN. The suggestions that you could have just jumped out of the way really had me scratching my head. Maybe if you're many years younger and many pounds lighter than me, you could do it IF you're one of those people that was raised on a tractor and operating it is just second nature so you're "one with the tractor" (oh, so Zen-like! :laugh:). For a lot of us (like me), we've only been operating these machines for a few years so sometimes it takes a second or two for you to process what the heck is happening. I know that things often happen in "slow motion", but after it's over, you're still wondering what the heck just happened. Before I got my ballast box and I was trying to pop some small tree stumps with the FEL, my tractor's rear end raised up pretty quickly on me!! My initial reaction was to stop doing what I was doing to cause the problem - in other words, I quickly moved the lever back to the neutral position. Then it takes a second to say "OK, let's lower the bucket so the rear end goes back on the ground." Maybe it's just because I'm old and slow, but I think that jumping off the tractor (including moving the tilt-steering wheel out of the way) while the tractor is going over is just a fantasy.

Again, glad you're OK (and the tractor is OK) and THANKS for sharing!!
 
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