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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a King Kutter rotary mower with my 1026R last year. The dual trailing wheels on the mower are small in diameter and have virtually no caster. This results in them frequently rotating on the vertical shafts and gouging the ground as they drag sideways.
At first I didn't mind as I was just clearing brush. Now that the areas have been cleared the furrowing made by those wheels is unsightly. I could cut and bend back the axle yokes or even heat and bend the shafts. Does anyone know of another fix?
It would certainly save time to just buy and replace with new wheels. Any suggestions? IMAG0297.jpg
 

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:wgtt:


Have you greased them? They look really clean and shiny with no evidence of grease.

Don't take that wrong. Heck you could wipe it down really good after you've greased and after using it for all I know. If you were to look at my loader you'd think I don't grease it either.:lol: I just keep the excess wiped up.
 

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What about trying to run the front of the mower lower and raising the rear up. That might put more weight on the wheels and provide a better angle for them to follow.

Sent via TapaTalk from a hunting blind near you. :)
 

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Welcome, from Texas!
 

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What about trying to run the front of the mower lower and raising the rear up. That might put more weight on the wheels and provide a better angle for them to follow.

Sent via TapaTalk from a hunting blind near you. :)
What I have always understood is that the front of the mower deck is supposed to be lower than the rear.
 

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Looking at those wheels I doubt any setting of the mower angle is going to help the "castor" swivelling and thus end the scuffing. The plane of the attaching post very nearly runs down through the center of the wheel axle. Can't possibly self-steer with that set-up. If it was mine i'd be looking at modifying the wheel back from the post some or finding an entire replacement wheel/post assembly.
 
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I agree with Harold. On my old KK rear mower (single wheel), the bracket the wheel axle runs through is closer to 45 degrees instead of almost straight up and down.
 

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I agree with Hydro and Andy. My LandPride cutter has a slanted rear wheel and it seems most cutters I have seen are also slanted.'

As for the height, I have always used the rear wheel to set the basic height of the cutter then use the three point to lower the front slightly. This helps with the discharge of clippings out the rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the replies.
To answer some questions; The wheels are very greased, just cleaned. The mower isn't even connected to the tractor so the angles would seem off. I do keep the front end lower with the weight only lightly on those wheels. Seems to trail best that way.
I think the answer is to simply replace them. I just have to find some compatible, reasonably priced ones.
JD offered to sell me a new mower at cost but that seems crazy to get a whole mower to fix the wheels!
 

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I too agree with Harold. Could you cut the "U" shaped bracket bend it and then fill the gap in?
Excess grease stops a lot of the fine dirt from getting to the all important bushings and joints. You either grease the heck out of bushings/joints leaving excess or don't grease at all, IMO. Just Sayin!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You could be right about greasing. Of course you could also make the argument that grease attracts and hold contaminants. Me, I like it clean.
I really don't think lube is the issue. Everything spins freely.
As for cutting the yokes, bending back and welding up, that is plan B.
 
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