Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking for an alternative to weed and grass control on my Bluestone driveway. I have been using Roundup but the cost and downsides are making me look into other alternatives. I also have used Roundup to control perimeter weeds. I'm looking into torching weeds on the drive but obviously that's not viable for the perimeter. Any ideas??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Hello LoneStranger, I have heard of folks using liquid Laundry Chlorine Bleach to knock back unwanted weeds. Pour or spray
full strength on top of unwanted vegetation. Around the upper MidWest there is a F/F that sells "Lavender Scent" bleach:gaah:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
I'm looking for an alternative to weed and grass control on my Bluestone driveway. I have been using Roundup but the cost and downsides are making me look into other alternatives. I also have used Roundup to control perimeter weeds. I'm looking into torching weeds on the drive but obviously that's not viable for the perimeter. Any ideas??
I was looking at Roundup in the home and garden section of a local store. Pretty pricey for the diluted stuff. I went few aisles over to the ag chemical section and bough a gallon of gylphosphate. I think it was called Gly-Star or something. Basic ingredient the same as the old Roundup that Monsanto made. Don't recall exact prices, but much less. Just checked on line. Gly-Star Plus is 16.99/gallon or 34.99/2.5 gallons. Roundup Weed & Grass Killer Super Concentrate - 35.2 Oz. is 44.99. All prices in USD. I'll let you do the math. Happy weed nuking.

The Roundup stuff is 50% active ingredient. Gly-Star is 41%. More info to calculate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
Bleach is effective, but not all that cheep in the quantities you might want.
White Vinegar is also quite effective. One recipe I've used is 1 gallon white vinegar heated with 1-2 cups of epsom salt in a pan until salt dissolves, after cooled add 1 tablespoon of Dawn dishwashing soap, this gives it stick-to-ness. Apply directly for HD needs or put in a spray bottle, but apply at the sunniest time of day. It's not as destructive as roundup, but a lot safer and will not harm the bees. BTW, it is also a pretty effective Poison Ivy killer, and it's stable.

The honey bees thank-you!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,353 Posts
I was looking at Roundup in the home and garden section of a local store. Pretty pricey for the diluted stuff. I went few aisles over to the ag chemical section and bough a gallon of gylphosphate. I think it was called Gly-Star or something. Basic ingredient the same as the old Roundup that Monsanto made. Don't recall exact prices, but much less. Just checked on line. Gly-Star Plus is 16.99/gallon or 34.99/2.5 gallons. Roundup Weed & Grass Killer Super Concentrate - 35.2 Oz. is 44.99. All prices in USD. I'll let you do the math. Happy weed nuking.
I bought some Farmworks 41% Glyphosate Concentrate at TSC. The current price is $42.99 for a 2-1/2 gallon jug. I paid a bit less as there was a sale at the time. Not quite as good of a deal as your Gly-Star but still much less expensive than Roudup branded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
Glyphosate is the stuff that is causing cancer and damaging the honeybee population.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,966 Posts
I bought some Farmworks 41% Glyphosate Concentrate at TSC. The current price is $42.99 for a 2-1/2 gallon jug. I paid a bit less as there was a sale at the time. Not quite as good of a deal as your Gly-Star but still much less expensive than Roudup branded.
I buy the same stuff - a jug lasts me a long time. I might use about 30-40 gallons of diluted product a year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,262 Posts
Water softener salt works well. Just spread on your driveway. When it rains it will start to dissolve the salt and then it kills the weeds. Grass too.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,963 Posts
I have an asphalt driveway, a slate front entryway area and a concrete paver patio out back. I use the torch. I like playing with fire! :laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
I bought some Farmworks 41% Glyphosate Concentrate at TSC. The current price is $42.99 for a 2-1/2 gallon jug. I paid a bit less as there was a sale at the time. Not quite as good of a deal as your Gly-Star but still much less expensive than Roudup branded.
Probably the same. The Gly-Star is 41% as well. The homeowner Roundup is 50%. I edited the earlier post with this info. This was at North40 in Great Falls, MT. No TSC near here, but they seem to be migrating this direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
I have several hundred foot of rip rap around my pond. It has to be sprayed several times a summer. Its just about the least favorite job here and it gets expensive. Last summer I (carefully) used liquid pool chlorine @ $2.99 gallon from Rural King. on the rip rap only, since that is where the weeds sprout. I thought it worked as well as round-up. Pond is large so few drops mean nothing. The Round Up available at Wal-Mart, Ace, TSC does not seem to be all that effective anyway. Many years ago I used to get an oil based herbicide from a local chemical company. I don't remember what is was but it came in 55 gal drums. I had a 900' gravel drive and would walk down one side and back the other. On the way back the weeds that were sprayed just a few minutes before were already turning black. Whatever it was is surely illegal now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,848 Posts
I utilize a total vegetation killer sold at the home improvement and farm stores. It comes in a gallon jug and is concentrated. If I recall correctly, a gallon will make 10 gallons. I apply with a 2.25 gallon hand pump sprayer jug/wand. I use it on the sand swimming beach and the expansion joints in the driveway/sidewalk. A single application in the spring takes care of it for the summer. Bear in mind, this is MN and the summer starts late in June and is pretty much over by Labor Day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
I just looked up what a "bluestone driveway" is . I don't think I would use a bleach or chlorine based liquid on it, or an oil based either. Some guys around here still use diesel fuel but it makes a mess and is probably illegal too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I have several hundred foot of rip rap around my pond. It has to be sprayed several times a summer. Its just about the least favorite job here and it gets expensive. Last summer I (carefully) used liquid pool chlorine @ $2.99 gallon from Rural King. on the rip rap only, since that is where the weeds sprout. I thought it worked as well as round-up. Pond is large so few drops mean nothing. The Round Up available at Wal-Mart, Ace, TSC does not seem to be all that effective anyway. Many years ago I used to get an oil based herbicide from a local chemical company. I don't remember what is was but it came in 55 gal drums. I had a 900' gravel drive and would walk down one side and back the other. On the way back the weeds that were sprayed just a few minutes before were already turning black. Whatever it was is surely illegal now.



Yeh, all the good stuff has been outlawed!:banghead:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
I buy Round Up Pro concentrate in 2.5 gallon size, a week ago I sprayed about 50 gallons. First spray of the season.

Round Up only causes cancer in California :laugh: , I’ve used it for 40 years and consider it safe. It breaks down quickly in soil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Glyphosate is the stuff that is causing cancer and damaging the honeybee population.


Glyphosate is a fairly benign product that has had extensive testing. Do not believe the tripe you hear in the news pushed by the lame stream media and money grubbing attorneys in pursuit of class action lawsuits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
Glyphosate is a fairly benign product that has had extensive testing. Do not believe the tripe you hear in the news pushed by the lame stream media and money grubbing attorneys in pursuit of class action lawsuits.
I respectfully feel you are absolutely wrong, your version is the big Monsanto lie. The courts have ruled against them twice in the last 6 months. Let us agree to disagree, neither of us will change the mind of the other.

Sent from my SM-T813 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
I respectfully feel you are absolutely wrong, your version is the big Monsanto lie. The courts have ruled against them twice in the last 6 months. Let us agree to disagree, neither of us will change the mind of the other.

Sent from my SM-T813 using Tapatalk


Court rulings have nothing to do with science and fact. Just look at jurors and judges if you want insight on what most would construe as common sense.

If You Accept Science, You Accept Roundup Does Not Cause Cancer | American Council on Science and Health


From the article:

Juries don’t decide science, and this latest court case produced no new scientific data. Those who believe glyphosate causes cancer often refer to the 2015 report by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) that classified the herbicide as “probably carcinogenic to humans”.

IARC’s conclusion was arrived at using a narrower base of evidence than other recent peer-reviewed papers and governmental reviews. Australia’s regulator, the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA), reviewed the safety of glyphosate after IARC’s determination. It’s 2016 report concluded that

based on current risk assessment the label instructions on all glyphosate products – when followed – provides adequate protection for users.

The Agricultural Health Study, which followed more than 50,000 people in the US for over ten years, was published in 2018. This real world study in the populations with the highest exposure to glyphosate showed that if there is any risk of cancer from glyphosate preparations, it is exceedingly small.

It also showed that the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma is negligible. It is unclear to what extent this study was used in the recent court case.

What did the IARC and others find?

Glyphosate is one of the most used herbicides worldwide. It kills weeds by targeting a specific pathway (the shikimic acid pathway) that exists in plants and a type of bacteria (eubacteria), but not animals (or humans).

In terms of short-term exposure, glyphosate is less toxic than table salt. However, it’s chronic, or long-term, exposure to glyphosate that’s causing the controversy.

Pesticides and herbicides are periodically re-evaluated for their safety and several studies have done so for glyphosate. For instance, in 2015, Germany’s Federal Institute for Risk Assessment suggested glyphosate was neither mutagenic nor carcinogenic.

But then came the IARC’s surprising classification. And the subsequent 2015 review by the European Food Safety Authority, that concluded glyphosate was unlikely to pose a carcinogenic hazard, didn’t alleviate sceptics.

The key differences between the IARC’s and other reports revolve around the breadth of evidence considered, the weight of human studies, consideration of physiological plausibility and, most importantly, risk assessment. The IARC did not take into account the extent of exposure to glyphosate to establish its association with cancer, while the others did.



There are many agricultural chemicals that are indeed hazardous. I have an applicator's license and can purchase restricted use pesticides. A few that I use in the orchard require extreme caution and I wouldn't dream of handling without proper PPE, gloves, goggles, tyvek suit and respirator..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
Court rulings have nothing to do with science and fact. Just look at jurors and judges if you want insight on what most would construe as common sense.

If You Accept Science, You Accept Roundup Does Not Cause Cancer | American Council on Science and Health


From the article:

Juries don’t decide science, and this latest court case produced no new scientific data. Those who believe glyphosate causes cancer often refer to the 2015 report by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) that classified the herbicide as “probably carcinogenic to humans”.

IARC’s conclusion was arrived at using a narrower base of evidence than other recent peer-reviewed papers and governmental reviews. Australia’s regulator, the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA), reviewed the safety of glyphosate after IARC’s determination. It’s 2016 report concluded that

based on current risk assessment the label instructions on all glyphosate products – when followed – provides adequate protection for users.

The Agricultural Health Study, which followed more than 50,000 people in the US for over ten years, was published in 2018. This real world study in the populations with the highest exposure to glyphosate showed that if there is any risk of cancer from glyphosate preparations, it is exceedingly small.

It also showed that the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma is negligible. It is unclear to what extent this study was used in the recent court case.

What did the IARC and others find?

Glyphosate is one of the most used herbicides worldwide. It kills weeds by targeting a specific pathway (the shikimic acid pathway) that exists in plants and a type of bacteria (eubacteria), but not animals (or humans).

In terms of short-term exposure, glyphosate is less toxic than table salt. However, it’s chronic, or long-term, exposure to glyphosate that’s causing the controversy.

Pesticides and herbicides are periodically re-evaluated for their safety and several studies have done so for glyphosate. For instance, in 2015, Germany’s Federal Institute for Risk Assessment suggested glyphosate was neither mutagenic nor carcinogenic.

But then came the IARC’s surprising classification. And the subsequent 2015 review by the European Food Safety Authority, that concluded glyphosate was unlikely to pose a carcinogenic hazard, didn’t alleviate sceptics.

The key differences between the IARC’s and other reports revolve around the breadth of evidence considered, the weight of human studies, consideration of physiological plausibility and, most importantly, risk assessment. The IARC did not take into account the extent of exposure to glyphosate to establish its association with cancer, while the others did.



There are many agricultural chemicals that are indeed hazardous. I have an applicator's license and can purchase restricted use pesticides. A few that I use in the orchard require extreme caution and I wouldn't dream of handling without proper PPE, gloves, goggles, tyvek suit and respirator..
Thank-you for sharing this, I will read it thoroughly. I do believe in science, but I also know that even scientific results can be bought. Not saying that happened here, but also not saying it didn't. The Monsanto company is no ones friend which leaves me suspicious. Look no further than big Pharma as an example of money driving the science. I am also concerned about the impact it has on bees, that doesn't appear to be addressed here. Thats all I'm going to say on this subject, except that I will read this with an open mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Thank-you for sharing this, I will read it thoroughly. I do believe in science, but I also know that even scientific results can be bought. Not saying that happened here, but also not saying it didn't. The Monsanto company is no ones friend which leaves me suspicious. Look no further than big Pharma as an example of money driving the science. I am also concerned about the impact it has on bees, that doesn't appear to be addressed here. Thats all I'm going to say on this subject, except that I will read this with an open mind.

I am not a fan of Monsanto by any means. Years ago when they had the patent monopoly jugs of Roundup were $172/2.5 gallon 25 years ago. Now the generic equivalent is $36 so they were truly gouging the public, much like big pharma does to this day on name brand drugs compared to generics.

Impacts on bees is a legitimate concern. However harm to bees is much more prevalent with insecticides rather than herbicides. It is against the law, FIFRA, (Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act) to apply any insecticide when pollinating insects are active. Being an apple grower and licensed applicator I am very cognizant of this.:usa
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top