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Discussion Starter #1
:laugh: Took today to work on my tilt cylinder.

Should've gotten a smaller rod cylinder for this, but this one was cheap. :lol:



This is a lift link for the 3-point hitch on the tractor. I got a 7" cylinder and cut it down to 5".



Then turned a chamfer on the end of the main tube to assist in getting a full depth weld.



Then cut a shoulder on the top part of the original lift link before cutting the unneeded part was cut off in the bandsaw.



Then I made a new end cap out of a laser drop I had which was too big, but the right thickness (allowing me to cut off the slot from the laser's pilot hole). So I milled a center plug with a shoulder to fit inside the cylinder end, then put a hole to fit the stub I turned on the factory eye, and welded them together.



Then I made a bung for the hydraulic fitting.



Then drilled the cylinder for the fluid passage, and welded it all together.



Brushed off most of the crispy paint while letting it cool a bit before doing the cap weld.



Just need to get the bottom end figured out and it'll be ready to go back together and get painted. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks!

Yep, it'll be green when it goes on the tractor. The orange is just what it came in from Surplus Center. It's a Prince cylinder; I'm not sure why it's orange.

I'm going to shorten up my top link and paint that green too (it's been black up until now). 12" stroke was a nice idea at the time, but it's just too long to tuck some of my stuff back far enough and it's entirely too long at full extension. That'll probably end up around 9" when I'm done with it.
 

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Beautiful work, Oh man ,how I wish I could weld.
 

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good job their Jim Timber, :bigthumb: looking good, ahh-green paint--it's wonderful-huh!!!!
 

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Yup, up to your usual good looking work again Jim. :good2:
I wouldn't have the guts to lop off the end of a cylinder and shorten it up and weld it
back together, you da man! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys!

What's 2750psi of hot liquid spraying all over to be scared of? Just think of the cool scars when they have to surgically remove it from your skin. :lolol: Ok, so leaky hydraulics is pretty serious stuff, which is why I didn't start off doing this stuff when I had a 120v MIG and half a clue how to use it. :mocking: Been a while since those days were behind me, and now I just do what I want and hope the engineering holds up to the task.

The bottom link on these things is perplexing. It saws like cast iron (grey dust), drills like higher carbon (will curl a chip), and sparks like high carbon, but it puddles and welds like mild leaded with TIG, and the arc goes bat-nuts with MIG (had to stick the gun down a hole - you'll see when I get pics). :dunno:

So in the sake of safety, I used 308/309 SS filler (I can't read the print on it and it's been 10 years since I bought the stuff) and did one pass to completely attach the flange to the rod and am letting it cool off. My IR thermometer says I got the end link up to around 300F, but the rod was only at 230F. I'm hoping I don't have a freaking crack when I go back out to finish it up. Wouldn't be the end of the world, but I really like how the factory link looks grafted onto the cylinder - almost like it's a JD part.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
No cracks! So I did the second pass and now it's just gotta cool down and it'll be ready to go back together. :yahoo:




I have some Ni55 rods around here somewhere that would've been a good choice as well (bust off the flux and you can TIG with them just like any other filler), but 308 SS has a higher elasticity than ER70s so it's the "other" go-to for cast repairs/welding.

I may put the button cap on the torch and see if I can work in the plug weld I did with MIG, but that's yet to be determined. There's not a lot of room in the gap between the two side plates and I'm not sure with the gas lens my #20 torch will have enough space to twirl a puddle even without the long cap. I've got about half an hour to decide (not supposed to let cast get below 100F between passes). :mocking:


I don't know what that stuff is. The top part (OD threaded rod end) is some seriously high tensile steel! That stuff's got chromium or something in it. Chattered like a mother when the cutter geometry wasn't absolutely perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So the MIG plug weld did end up cracking, which makes me think this really is cast iron of some form (maybe malleable?).



I switched over to a #5 nozzle without gas lens and tried adding in some SS filler, but all it did was bubble and spit so I gave up with that approach. If it ever cracks off the fillet weld, then I'll just make a steel lower link like everyone else does. Maybe it'll never be an issue. We'll find out in due time.

I'm pretty happy with my margin on the shoulder fillet. The HAZ in the chrome plating doesn't even reach the wiper. :good2:



With that all buttoned up, it's off to paint!

 

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Discussion Starter #10
The composition of the lower link was bugging me, so I did the chisel test and it's absolutely some form of iron. Now that makes me nervous about my fillet weld in tension holding the weight of the lower link.

There's plenty of meat in the link's casting - probably at least 1/4" wall thickness around the whole thing. What I'm contemplating is drilling all the way through the link and rod and putting a bolt in there to reduce the stress placed on the weld. Does that seem like a reasonable precautionary solution?
 

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:laugh: Took today to work on my tilt cylinder.




Damn Jim Timber just damn. Speechless here, impressive work. :good2:
IMO those three welds↑↑↑ are particularly impressive, especially the weld on the hydraulic fitting.
 

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Jim, your question is way out of my league to answer.

I can only offer this, go with what your gut is telling you.

That is some very impressive work in my book! :thumbup1gif:
 

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:good2::thumbup1gif::good2::thumbup1gif::good2::thumbup1gif:
 

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The composition of the lower link was bugging me, so I did the chisel test and it's absolutely some form of iron. Now that makes me nervous about my fillet weld in tension holding the weight of the lower link.

There's plenty of meat in the link's casting - probably at least 1/4" wall thickness around the whole thing. What I'm contemplating is drilling all the way through the link and rod and putting a bolt in there to reduce the stress placed on the weld. Does that seem like a reasonable precautionary solution?
Double edge sword there, drilling and putting a bolt makes the link weaker, but makes the weld maybe stronger stress wise..............:unknown:
What size bolt can you get away with?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The bottom nub is just under 3/4" and the ID below the shoulder is 1.25" for a little over an inch of depth. It's not a tight fit because I didn't go to the lengths needed to bore the end link's cavity round for a nice fit, so it's not well supported outside the fillet.

So in compression, things are fine, but in tension the fillet is the only thing holding the end on, and it's a cast iron weld. :banghead: My gut says to supplement it with a 3/8" grade 8 bolt low in the rod extension so it gets plenty of meat above it. Fortunately, the loads are near linear in the application and the bottom of the link is already being supported by a 5/8" pin so that shouldn't be problematic.
 

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The bottom nub is just under 3/4" and the ID below the shoulder is 1.25" for a little over an inch of depth. It's not a tight fit because I didn't go to the lengths needed to bore the end link's cavity round for a nice fit, so it's not well supported outside the fillet.

So in compression, things are fine, but in tension the fillet is the only thing holding the end on, and it's a cast iron weld. :banghead: My gut says to supplement it with a 3/8" grade 8 bolt low in the rod extension so it gets plenty of meat above it. Fortunately, the loads are near linear in the application and the bottom of the link is already being supported by a 5/8" pin so that shouldn't be problematic.
Think the single shear of a grade 8 3/8 bolt is around 10K PSI, but you would be using it in a double shear configuration if
I'm thinking right about what you're doing??
 

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Old Pa-pa
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I'd put it lower in the link so it has more material above it, but that picture is otherwise accurate.
Should do, but sure would have been nice if the link wasn't cast.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I'm on the fence about doing anything. It welded really nice at the flange and there's plenty of meat in the weld.

What I think I'll do is weld up the 2" stub I cut off when I shortened it to the drop from the top of the bottom link in as close to a match as I can do without extra work, and then beat the snot out of it and see what happens. If it'll crack off, then I'll cut my losses and cut off the bottom and make a steel one now. If it holds up, then I'm good to go.
 
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