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New to 1023e SCUT and was moving some sand using my loader. I bought 5 bags of sand 50lbs. each and unloaded from my truck into my bucket. Then I proceeded down a small grade with my loaded approx. 4ft off the ground. The ground also had a downward slope to the left of tractor. As I was turning right going slowly downhill the rear right tire started to lift off the ground! I put the brakes on slowly noticing what was happening. I immediately
moved my weight to the right rear and tractor settled back down to the ground but it shut off because of no weight on seat! Yes I did a really stupid thing, I didn"t wear my seat belt and didn't have my rops up!!! Very Stupid!!!! Every time I tried to start tractor It wouln't because of no weight on seat. So I had to try to get enough weight on seat so it would crank and start but when I did the tractor would start to tip. Then I thought to lower loader to lower the center of gravity of the weight. That worked and I was able to start tractor and get myself out of trouble.[/B] I thought this was just a quick little job and didn't realize that 250 lbs. in loader would do that! I didn't have my weights on for ballast because I thought it was a light load. I hate even telling this story of my stupidity and pride but feel if someone else reads this maybe they will learn from my experience!!! I hope so, and am so glad the big guy up above was watching over me!!! I will never use loader without my seat belt on or without the ROPS up!!!:crazy::crazy: I'm Done!!!!!
 

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I will never use loader without my seat belt on or without the ROPS up!!!:crazy::crazy: I'm Done!!!!!
I'm glad everything turned out okay. Thank you for sharing your story. These types of stories can not be shared too often as it is too easy to forget

I do hope that you also never use your loader without attaching the 3PH ballast.

In addition, you should only wear the seat belt when the ROPS is up. If you have the ROPS folded do not wear your seat belt. The operator's manual has a section which mentions this.

Again, thank you for sharing and I'm glad it had a happy ending.
 

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Wow, I'm glad you're okay and so is the tractor.

It takes courage to share a story like that; most wouldn't, so thanks for that.

Even with ballast, try to keep the load as low as possible. If the bucket can only drop a few inches and hit the ground, it should help stabilize the tractor.
 

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I'm glad you are ok. Ballast is your best friend. You have to train yourself to habbitually calculate how much rear weight you need to offset front work and especially with a loader. A couple hundred pounds might not seem like much but it can be catastrophic when all the stars line up and they almost did for you. These machines aren't nearly as heavy with weight hanging from them as they seem just looking at them. The good lord was looking out for you. :hi:
 

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lesson

New to 1023e SCUT and was moving some sand using my loader. I bought 5 bags of sand 50lbs. each and unloaded from my truck into my bucket. Then I proceeded down a small grade with my loaded approx. 4ft off the ground. The ground also had a downward slope to the left of tractor. As I was turning right going slowly downhill the rear right tire started to lift off the ground! I put the brakes on slowly noticing what was happening. I immediately
moved my weight to the right rear and tractor settled back down to the ground but it shut off because of no weight on seat! Yes I did a really stupid thing, I didn"t wear my seat belt and didn't have my rops up!!! Very Stupid!!!! Every time I tried to start tractor It wouln't because of no weight on seat. So I had to try to get enough weight on seat so it would crank and start but when I did the tractor would start to tip. Then I thought to lower loader to lower the center of gravity of the weight. That worked and I was able to start tractor and get myself out of trouble.[/B] I thought this was just a quick little job and didn't realize that 250 lbs. in loader would do that! I didn't have my weights on for ballast because I thought it was a light load. I hate even telling this story of my stupidity and pride but feel if someone else reads this maybe they will learn from my experience!!! I hope so, and am so glad the big guy up above was watching over me!!! I will never use loader without my seat belt on or without the ROPS up!!!:crazy::crazy: I'm Done!!!!!


2 very important thing to never forget 1 keep the loader as close to the ground when ever possible 2 back down if possible
both have been learned running a fork lift .
of course you know that now .
I believe that dealers should give a common sense operators lesson to people that have never run heavy equipment
it could save a lot of pucker time !!!!:laugh:
I'm glad your ok
 

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*nods* I think we all go through one of these at some point. I did something pretty similar early on trying to unload a ton of wood pellets from the bed of my truck.

I think that because you were headed down a slope, your center of balance was already shifting some. Turning to the right added to that a bit. And then you throw in the 250 lbs in the loader bucket and your rear wheel started lifting off the ground. You probably caught all 3 issues combined just right.

So the lesson learned is to always keep that loader bucket as low as possible when traveling, keep that ROPS up when using the loader and to wear that dang seatbelt! Because we all want ya back here telling us what other stupid stuff ya done did! :laugh:

Luckily, it doesn't sound like anyone or anything was hurt. :good2:
 

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Been there, done that! Other than the driveway in, I have a section of flat land that's probably 20x50 feet. All the rest of the 20 acres is slopes of varying steepness, most very steep. ROPS and seat belt seems like a small price to pay to minimize the danger. That and going straight up and down the hills, and I have fewer of those moments these days. :laugh:

Glad you and the tractor are ok!
 

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I learned quickly one day when hauling a load in the bucket that the brakes don't do much going down hill as I stepped on them and the back tires just slid along. I set the bucket on the ground to stop and then switched into 4 x 4 and proceeded on my way with no difficulty. It sure got my attention though.
 

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A couple of things to do when transporting a load:
  • As others have pointed out, always keep the load as low as possible.
  • Keep your hand on the loader control so you can drop the lift arms as soon as you feel any imbalance.
  • When in doubt, turn downhill. This will restore lateral stability and coupled with the previous item, keep all 4 wheels on the ground.
Al
 

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I would rather come here and share a humble story that we can all laugh a little over then to hear of a member that got hurt for something that was just overlooked. Glad to hear you didn't get hurt. At the end of the day, that's all that really matters. :bigbeer:
 

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I started a thread a little over a year ago on what you just did. But my ending wasn't as good. My tractor laid down on it's side. Guess it needed a rest. I also had some work to do it get it back into running order. Lesson learned? Yep. Thing is I wasn't new to this. I knew better. As I was reading your post I was remembering what happened to me and was glad you didn't end up like I did. I thought I was going to read just what happened to me and was glad I was wrong on that part. Very glad everything ended up OK.
 

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2 very important thing to never forget 1 keep the loader as close to the ground when ever possible 2 back down if possible
both have been learned running a fork lift .
of course you know that now .
I believe that dealers should give a common sense operators lesson to people that have never run heavy equipment
it could save a lot of pucker time !!!!:laugh:
I'm glad your ok
While I have been on tractors on hills all my life, I wasn’t all familiar with forks lifts. As an equipment operator instructor I had to learn so I could give the forklift course. I learned a lot about just what we are talking about here which can (should) be applied to these little tractors.

There are 2 basic things as you say - keep the load as low as possible at all times - and when on a grade the load should always be above you even if it means backing down a hill.
 

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Thanks for sharing your experience mikdor, I'm sure this happens for more often than some are willing to post, glad you're okay and it was just a valuable lesson learned. :good2:
 

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I’m moving this thread to the Tractor and Equipment Safety sub forum for all to see. This happened on a SCUT, but could happen to anyone on any tractor.

You only get one shot at this thing called life. Make it count. :good2:

My hat is off to mikdor for sharing this reminder. :hi:
 

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It's not just the little guys

I’m moving this thread to the Tractor and Equipment Safety sub forum for all to see. This happened on a SCUT, but could happen to anyone on any tractor.

You only get one shot at this thing called life. Make it count. :good2:

My hat is off to mikdor for sharing this reminder. :hi:
I absolutely agree that larger tractors can lift and flip too. The only difference is shifting your weight on the seat of a larger tractor doesn't do much so keeping the load low, proceeding cautiously on hills etc. is critical.

Anytime a rear wheel is off the ground you lose stability. It's the rear wheels that keep you upright as the front axle pivots. Keeping your hand on the loader control and ready to lower the loader is the quickest way to get the rear back down on the ground.

I'm glad you weren't hurt and appreciate you sharing the experience.

Treefarmer
 

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While I have been on tractors on hills all my life, I wasn’t all familiar with forks lifts. As an equipment operator instructor I had to learn so I could give the forklift course. I learned a lot about just what we are talking about here which can (should) be applied to these little tractors.

There are 2 basic things as you say - keep the load as low as possible at all times - and when on a grade the load should always be above you even if it means backing down a hill.
My only caution - and if I'm wrong, corrections are welcome:

There are 2 kinds of forklifts. The standard warehouse model that is only operated safely on hard surfaces and the (I don't know what they are formally called) construction machines that are really special purpose tractors designed to operate on rough terrain.

I've never seen a place where your could realistically operate the former on a side slope. I see them used all the time on ramps where, as you say, you have a choice of going up or down with the load and the lift in alignment with the ramp. I can see where the load being uphill is safer.

I think you should put that out of your mind if you are using a tractor to carry a load on a side slope because if you decide to turn upslope to put the load uphill from the machine, you will flip over. Turning downhill moves the overturning moment towards the centerline of the machine and lowers the center of gravity making it more stable laterally as you turn. You might still end up with the rear wheels off the ground (that's why you need to be ready to drop the load), but if the wheels are off the ground with the load at 90 degrees to the slope, you will flip over.

Al
 

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1) I'm glad you're OK, mikdor!!!

2) THANKS for posting this!! A lot of guys would have been too embarrassed. The timing of your experience is a good reminder for the rest of us as the weather gets warmer and we're more apt to be out on our tractors doing FEL work.

3) Did you tell your wife what happened?? :laugh: Is she still allowing you to get on the tractor? :laugh:

4) Your signature shows that you have a Heavy Hitch and 8 suitcase weights. Did you have it installed when this happened? I don't know the specs on your tractor, but be sure to take another look at the owner's manual to make sure the 8 weights are enough. Remember, even if the manual says your loader can lift xxxx pounds, if you don't have the RECOMMENDED/REQUIRED ballast on the rear, you cannot SAFELY lift xxxx pounds.

Again, THANKS for sharing!! :bigthumb:
 

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New to 1023e SCUT and was moving some sand using my loader. I bought 5 bags of sand 50lbs. each and unloaded from my truck into my bucket. Then I proceeded down a small grade with my loaded approx. 4ft off the ground. The ground also had a downward slope to the left of tractor. As I was turning right going slowly downhill the rear right tire started to lift off the ground! I put the brakes on slowly noticing what was happening. I immediately
moved my weight to the right rear and tractor settled back down to the ground but it shut off because of no weight on seat! Yes I did a really stupid thing, I didn"t wear my seat belt and didn't have my rops up!!! Very Stupid!!!! Every time I tried to start tractor It wouln't because of no weight on seat. So I had to try to get enough weight on seat so it would crank and start but when I did the tractor would start to tip. Then I thought to lower loader to lower the center of gravity of the weight. That worked and I was able to start tractor and get myself out of trouble.[/B] I thought this was just a quick little job and didn't realize that 250 lbs. in loader would do that! I didn't have my weights on for ballast because I thought it was a light load. I hate even telling this story of my stupidity and pride but feel if someone else reads this maybe they will learn from my experience!!! I hope so, and am so glad the big guy up above was watching over me!!! I will never use loader without my seat belt on or without the ROPS up!!!:crazy::crazy: I'm Done!!!!!




Glad to hear you're OK .

As others have mentioned , Thanks for the post, along with your tips, always keep bucket low to the ground, use BALLAST, and keep your hand on lever to lower the bucket.
 
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