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Discussion Starter #1
'09 Silverado 1500, she just rolled over 180K miles and I'm on the original brakes. Time to redo them I'd say.

The rotors are getting a little pulsing. As a rule on the front I like to do the pads and rotors. The rear generally just the shoe. I don't mind purchasing higher quality parts, and find online reviews of brake parts questionable. Before I purchase, I thought kicking around the collective knowledge base would shake out some suggestions regarding brands. Both, ones to purchase and the ones to stay away from.

TIA
 

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OEM parts are always a direct fit and you can't complain about the service you've received. At that mileage you may also want to replace all of the drum brake hardware and consider rebuilt front calipers. Check your brake hoses for any indications of checking / splitting.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Another vote for OEM - I don鈥檛 mess around with questionable quality from auto parts stores.

I am surprised you have drum brakes on the rear - I thought everything had disc brakes all around for many years.
I think earlier years (and then again some time later) had rear disc brakes, but not this one. I remember saying to the sales dude, that I too was surprised too about the rear drums.:unknown:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Have to laugh...is buying used brakes really a "thing"?

Perhaps I should sell my used brake components as "broke in and well tested"!!



brakes.png
 

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With 180,000 miles I would be tempted to use GM OEM pads. You are much easier on brakes than I am.
I agree, although, there is a huge difference in driving in Iowa than NE PA. Iowa drivers do not have to turn the steering wheel or go up and down mountains and steep hills like in PA. Just saying.:good2:


I also vote for OEM!!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I agree, although, there is a huge difference in driving in Iowa than NE PA. Iowa drivers do not have to turn the steering wheel or go up and down mountains and steep hills like in PA. Just saying.:good2:


I also vote for OEM!!

HOLD IT RIGHT THERE BUSTER. We have a corner, and a hill. Regarding stopping your right on that, we can see a mile or 3 in advance. :laugh:

The funny thing tho...my wife's brakes last MAYBE 50K miles....wonder why? :dunno:
 

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HOLD IT RIGHT THERE BUSTER. We have a corner, and a hill. Regarding stopping your right on that, we can see a mile or 3 in advance. :laugh:

The funny thing tho...my wife's brakes last MAYBE 50K miles....wonder why? :dunno:
:lolol:
 

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Yep! Another vote for OEM. Cost a bit more but they are the way to go.

As for GM drums/rotors, they couldn't (and maybe still can't) make up their mind. My brothers 2012 GMC has drum rear. So far, as of the 2018 model, they (GM) are still staying with disc on all four. Pretty sure this is the longest stint for disc rears.:good2: More than likely there will be collective analysis over the past few years, as to the performance and durability of the four wheel disc. Hopefully it stays the way it is. I never had a drum brake that I liked.:nunu:
 

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:laugh: mmy 2000 yr had all disc-05 and 06 had drums on the back. which i liked better :dunno: rear drums are IMO-way easier to replace even the E-brake.

jeepers -i wished i got that kind of wear out of mine. this 06 has had -well on the 3rd set at 90,000 miles-rotors-and new rear drums. running the Pa. pike thru the wintertime killed my rear drums. ate em up nuthing.

my 2000 got almost 50,000 miles on the first set-but i was traveling on the interstate every week back then-so i contribute that to the longer wear.

my-vote is for the same ones-from factory-OEM.:good2:
 

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Either the GM OEM pads or Duralast (which are OEM equivalents).

I replaced the pads & calipers on my 2012 Tundra with "Power Stop" performance pads/calipers last fall. They were advertised as having better braking performance with heavy loads and I tow a camper so that sounded like a good idea. I took the rotors off and had them turned at a local garage.

This summer I was on vacation and ended up having to slam on my brakes to avoid a deer while coming down a hill. The anti-lock brake system kicked in but it was a very hard braking anyway. Immediately after that, the brakes shuddered every time I applied them. That slowly got worse over the summer.

I finally ended up taking the brakes apart again and took the rotors back down to the garage. Turns out that the hard braking had caused enough heat to warp the front rotors. I called the folks at Power Stop and they basically said "Yup! That can happen!". Essentially, the "high performance" pads can withstand heat levels that the OEM rotors can't deal with. If you want to use them you really need to upgrade your rotors too.

I ended up replacing rotors and pads all around with Duralast parts from AutoZone and my problem went away.
 

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Yep! Another vote for OEM. Cost a bit more but they are the way to go.

As for GM drums/rotors, they couldn't (and maybe still can't) make up their mind. My brothers 2012 GMC has drum rear. So far, as of the 2018 model, they (GM) are still staying with disc on all four. Pretty sure this is the longest stint for disc rears.:good2: More than likely there will be collective analysis over the past few years, as to the performance and durability of the four wheel disc. Hopefully it stays the way it is. I never had a drum brake that I liked.:nunu:
I always had corosion problems with rear drum brakes from the salt/sand mixture on the roads. It seems not near the problems now with discs.
as far as rotors - if they aren鈥檛 perfect I replace them - never had a rotor turned in my life. I got into this habit with my VW鈥檚 which states in the manuals to always replace the rotors when you replace the pads.

So far on my pickup I have only needed front brakes - automatically told the shop to replace the rotors at the same time (OEM at the Ford shop).
 

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I always had corosion problems with rear drum brakes from the salt/sand mixture on the roads. It seems not near the problems now with discs.
as far as rotors - if they aren鈥檛 perfect I replace them - never had a rotor turned in my life. I got into this habit with my VW鈥檚 which states in the manuals to always replace the rotors when you replace the pads.

So far on my pickup I have only needed front brakes - automatically told the shop to replace the rotors at the same time (OEM at the Ford shop).
I'm the same Stan. Whether drum or rotor, I never "reused" (had them trued) them when I replaced the pads/shoes.
 

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I normally only go with OEM, and sometimes I turn the rotors at the same time, sometimes I leave them alone. To those referring to replacing rotors when replacing brakes, I discovered when helping my neighbor replace the brakes on his Mercedes, that the rotors are not a long life rotor and Mercedes specifies replacing the rotors at the same times as replacing the brakes, so that could be influencing your decision. Therefore replacing brakes on those gets to be pretty expensive. I believe this to be the case with many foreign cars.

Currently, I have 125,000 miles on my 2003 Lincoln car on the original 4 wheel disk brakes. I replaced the original 4 wheel disk brakes on my 2011 F250 at 140,000 miles with OEM because I was going to be pulling a gooseneck tandem dually with a gvw of 25,000# and wanted to make sure I had good brakes. I did have all 4 rotors turned. I have never replaced a rotor or drum. My girlfriend has 96,000 miles on her 2013 Explorer with 4 wheel disk brakes and they have never been replaced. We both probably drive a little different than the average driver. I used to have a next door neighbor that drove a Dodge 3/4 ton van. He said he could never get a set of brakes to last longer than 30,000 miles. Most of his driving was in city traffic. I rode with him one time and I swore I would never ride with him again. No wonder he has to replace the brakes so often.

Ford has had 4 wheel disk brakes for quite a number of years, at least since 2009 on the F150 and I am pretty sure it has been that way since 2004. GM was a little late to the party as only some models had 4 wheel disk brakes until fairly recently. I think they are across the board now.

Dave
 

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I pretty much do this after having new brakes/rotors installed or with new vehicles and boy you can sure smell the brake pads getting HOT. Has severed me well over the years.

https://www.powerstop.com/brake-pad-break-in-procedure/

IMPORTANT: BREAK IN NEW BRAKE PADS/ROTORS USING THE PAD BEDDING PROCEDURE AS FOLLOWS. PROPER PAD BEDDING CAN PREVENT ROTOR WARPING.

The break in procedure is critical to brake performance. The reason for a proper break in is to establish an even layer of friction material deposited on the rotors from the brake pads. It is very important that this initial layer of friction material is evenly distributed.
Break in the pads as follows:

5 moderate to aggressive stops from 40 mph down to 10 mph in rapid succession
without letting the brakes cool and do not come to a complete stop.
If you're forced to stop, either shift into neutral or give room in front so you can allow the vehicle to roll slightly while waiting for the light.
The rotors will be very hot and holding down the brake pedal will allow the pad to create an imprint on the rotor.
This is where the judder can originate from.

Then do 5 moderate stops from 35 mph to 5 mph in rapid succession without letting the brakes cool.
You should expect to smell some resin as the brakes get hot.

After this is complete, drive around for as long as possible without excessively heating the brakes and without coming to a complete stop
(Try for about 5 minutes at moderate speed). This is the cooling stage. It allows the heated resin in the brake pads to cool and cure.

After the brakes have cooled to standard operating temperature, you may use the brakes normally.
 

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I pretty much do this after having new brakes/rotors installed or with new vehicles and boy you can sure smell the brake pads getting HOT. Has severed me well over the years.

https://www.powerstop.com/brake-pad-break-in-procedure/

IMPORTANT: BREAK IN NEW BRAKE PADS/ROTORS USING THE PAD BEDDING PROCEDURE AS FOLLOWS. PROPER PAD BEDDING CAN PREVENT ROTOR WARPING.

The break in procedure is critical to brake performance. The reason for a proper break in is to establish an even layer of friction material deposited on the rotors from the brake pads. It is very important that this initial layer of friction material is evenly distributed.
Break in the pads as follows:

5 moderate to aggressive stops from 40 mph down to 10 mph in rapid succession
without letting the brakes cool and do not come to a complete stop.
If you're forced to stop, either shift into neutral or give room in front so you can allow the vehicle to roll slightly while waiting for the light.
The rotors will be very hot and holding down the brake pedal will allow the pad to create an imprint on the rotor.
This is where the judder can originate from.

Then do 5 moderate stops from 35 mph to 5 mph in rapid succession without letting the brakes cool.
You should expect to smell some resin as the brakes get hot.

After this is complete, drive around for as long as possible without excessively heating the brakes and without coming to a complete stop
(Try for about 5 minutes at moderate speed). This is the cooling stage. It allows the heated resin in the brake pads to cool and cure.

After the brakes have cooled to standard operating temperature, you may use the brakes normally.

Yup. I did all that. Either I did it wrong or it just didn't prevent the warping.
 

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I think earlier years (and then again some time later) had rear disc brakes, but not this one. I remember saying to the sales dude, that I too was surprised too about the rear drums.:unknown:
So there was a period of a few years where GM went back to drums on their light duty trucks to save $$. I think it was right before and during their bankruptcy. Another dumb bean counter decision if you ask me.

I have had good luck with pads from Advance Auto Parts. If you can get AC Delco without the dealer price mark up then that will work too. The biggest problem I have had with my 2007 Chevy 3500 is having the front brake pads rattle. It's a common problem so pay attention to that when you do the job. In my mind no need to replace the calipers if they are working fine and the rubber boots are not torn etc. Rotors and pads, yes. I would get the drums turned, if you can find someone to that, or might be just as cheap to buy new ones.

You have got a long life out of the brakes. I get about 75k out of my front discs and just changed my rears at about 125k but then I tow pretty heavy sometimes.
 
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