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I decided to check the propane line I installed a few years back for leaks since I smelled just a bit while up on a ladder.

I managed to fix this one in the area where I smelled propane . . .

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Then I went to the next connection down-stream and sure enough, there's a leak. (I suspect I created it by fixing the leak in the above picture which is upstream.)

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These two shots show what I'd have to dis-assemble, tape again, then reassemble if that's what I decided to do.

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So I'm looking for suggestions on fixing this leak, the pipe going into the elbow. Or is it more trouble than it's worth? :unknown:

What would be acceptable?

Would heating the connection with a heat gun possibly help?

Are there other options?

Looking for suggestions . . . :munch: :munch:
 

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I decided to check the propane line I installed a few years back for leaks since I smelled just a bit while up on a ladder.

So I'm looking for suggestions on fixing this leak, the pipe going into the elbow. Or is it more trouble than it's worth? :unknown:

What would be acceptable?

Would heating the connection with a heat gun possibly help?

Are there other options?

Looking for suggestions . . . :munch: :munch:
No propane leak is really acceptable. Honestly Marlin, if it were me, I'd pull it apart and redope the fittings.
 

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I have very limited experience with gas lines but the coupe of times I've watched guys install them, they start at one end (usually at the appliance) and work their way piece-by-piece and fitting-by-fitting to the supply. To do any work on the lines you essentially have disconnect the line at the supply point and slowly disassemble the whole thing back to the problem point, fix the problem and then reassemble everything again. It's black steel pipe so grab a couple of good sized pipe wrenches. The threads will break free.
 

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I’d stay away from tape. Use a good pipe dope rated for gas. It’s a tad messier but the end product is much less likely to leak.
 

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Pipe dope:bigthumb:
 

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If you could lower that section, you might be able to get a full turn on that ell, then lift it back up and put it in place, but as stated I would shutdown the electrical and the fuel and disassemble it, clean the fittings with a wire brush, then use rectorseal rated for it. Make sure the fittings are tight, obviously. It's a tapered thread and looking at some of those joints you can see they weren't tightened enough. Probably the pipe was cut a little short, so it was left loose. If you don't disassemble and start over, you'll just be chasing it from one joint to another.

They do make a coiled pvc coated line they use on the high pressure side of the regulators, but it looks like there's a shut off downstream from that ell plus the flex to the unit.
 

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You turned the pipe to the left of the frame and the fitting in your first picture and that caused the leak in the second your surmise?

Aren’t there gas pipe fittings made the tighten both ways and join supply and appliance side lines in the middle? I would have thought that the fitting in the middle of your first pic was just such a fitting and tried to tighten it thereby sealing your leak and not loosening the whole mess...
 

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I would check all the other connections for leaks as well. You may have used a pipe dope the was acceptable for water but not propane. If that's the only leak you could cut the line (after opening the end to let the gas escape) and get the ends threaded and put in a union. That would keep you from having to take the line apart piece by piece.
Ron
 

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I would get rid of the black pipe and use coiled copper with flares or CSST (corrugated stainless steel tubing) to hook it up. That way you only have two places for a leak, and both are less likely than all those threaded connections. I hate black pipe for gas and air lines.

https://www.lowes.com/pl/CSST-pipe-fittings-Pipe-fittings-Plumbing/4294566046
Thinking the same thing, less chance for a leak. If you leave the black pipe, or cooper and flair fittings, use pipe dope.
 

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I would get rid of the black pipe and use coiled copper with flares or CSST (corrugated stainless steel tubing) to hook it up. That way you only have two places for a leak, and both are less likely than all those threaded connections. I hate black pipe for gas and air lines.

https://www.lowes.com/pl/CSST-pipe-fittings-Pipe-fittings-Plumbing/4294566046
I bought some of this at Lowe's for a Natural Gas heater at my shop in town. Had an argument for 10 min with the cashier because she wanted to see my Mechanical license. I don't have one but why would I need one if I was installing this myself on a property I own and ultimately getting an inspection to get the gas turned on. She called her manager over and I discussed it with him and he said I guess it's ok. Still to this day I have no idea what happened.

But like Ken said only two places to leak and really easy to handle and install.
 

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The thing to remember about csst piping is that you must size it correctly. 1/2” csst doesn’t carry near the btu’s that 1/2” black iron carries. You may have to jump a size or two to get the correct flow.

Most csst manufacturers require you to be certified to use it. If you are not certified, the individual who sold it to you can be held liable if there was a “big boom”.

Remember that if you are going reuse you black pipe, to make sure you get all the tape residue off before you apply pipe dope.
 

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I bought some of this at Lowe's for a Natural Gas heater at my shop in town. Had an argument for 10 min with the cashier because she wanted to see my Mechanical license. I don't have one but why would I need one if I was installing this myself on a property I own and ultimately getting an inspection to get the gas turned on. She called her manager over and I discussed it with him and he said I guess it's ok. Still to this day I have no idea what happened.

But like Ken said only two places to leak and really easy to handle and install.
The thing to remember about csst piping is that you must size it correctly. 1/2” csst doesn’t carry near the btu’s that 1/2” black iron carries. You may have to jump a size or two to get the correct flow.

Most csst manufacturers require you to be certified to use it. If you are not certified, the individual who sold it to you can be held liable if there was a “big boom”.

Remember that if you are going reuse you black pipe, to make sure you get all the tape residue off before you apply pipe dope.
What I don't understand is that you can easily but black pipe for gas even though there is 100x more chance of leaks and a "big boom" using it :dunno:

Copper is just as easy to use if they give you grief about buying CCST.
 

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What I don't understand is that you can easily but black pipe for gas even though there is 100x more chance of leaks and a "big boom" using it :dunno:

Copper is just as easy to use if they give you grief about buying CCST.
Don’t disagree! I think the biggest thing is the certification keeps the homeowner from buying it, thus allowing the trades to provide that service. There is also the issue with proper grounding.
 

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I bought some of this at Lowe's for a Natural Gas heater at my shop in town. Had an argument for 10 min with the cashier because she wanted to see my Mechanical license. I don't have one but why would I need one if I was installing this myself on a property I own and ultimately getting an inspection to get the gas turned on. She called her manager over and I discussed it with him and he said I guess it's ok. Still to this day I have no idea what happened.

But like Ken said only two places to leak and really easy to handle and install.
I just used this stuff to plumb propane from the tank to the gas range and cloths dryer. I mail ordered it from Home Depot. No questions asked.

I never heard about anyone restricting it. How do they know you aren’t just making an extension for your Weber gas grill?

One thing that really helps is having a professional grade flare tool. They are quite different than the split-bar style you typically see sold at the hardware store.
 

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Most csst manufacturers require you to be certified to use it. If you are not certified, the individual who sold it to you can be held liable if there was a “big boom”.
.
Most of the big booms around here are a result of natural gas leaks. There seems to rarely be an explosion from propane.

I attribute this to propane being heavier than air and natural gas being lighter than air.
 

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The certs are pain, but I would much rather install csst versus black iron. Done a job several months ago, 1 1/4 black iron from the gas valve under a house up the outside and into the garage attic. 160’ total. Pressure tested it, and it wouldn’t hold. Checked all the joints, couldn’t find it. Several hours later......checked the gauge and it was ok. Spent the rest of the day crawling all over the line trying to find the leak. Next morning the gas company showed up and they tested it and everything was fine. Ended up being a faulty gauge after all. No more black iron unless it is outside. BTW...I bought a new gauge.
 

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Don't they normally use the CSST for high pressure? That's what they did with my generator. He said he could either run black iron along the garage or if I wanted to buy a high pressure regulator on the tank, he could bury the CSST tubing, so I went that route. Maybe that's why they require certification? :dunno:
 

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Don't they normally use the CSST for high pressure? That's what they did with my generator. He said he could either run black iron along the garage or if I wanted to buy a high pressure regulator on the tank, he could bury the CSST tubing, so I went that route. Maybe that's why they require certification? :dunno:
High pressure in propane systems is only about 2 pounds. My system has buried copper from my 1000 gallon buried tank to an intermediate regulator on the rear of the house, then a single 3/4" CCST to a manifold with it's own regulator that feeds 4 appliances (water heater, dryer, stove/oven, and 1st floor furnace backup) all with 1/2" CSST. All professionally installed when I build my house in 2003. None of it is grounded either. I later added a tee to the "high" pressure side of the intermediate regulator and ran CSST to my Generac automatic 15kw genset.
 

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Recctorseal rated for propane is the stuff to use for pipe dope.

I'd use a union fitting like this instead of that coupling so you can tighten the pipe going both directions without loosening one side.

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