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Hello friends, we're in the market for a single shank, category 2 subsoiler. Wonder if anyone can give recommendations on a unit you've been really pleased with? We've budgeted five hundred dollars, but on preliminary investigation there seems to be a price gap between $300-$800. Guidance appreciated! :beers:
 

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Subsoiler

Hello friends, we're in the market for a single shank, category 2 subsoiler. Wonder if anyone can give recommendations on a unit you've been really pleased with? We've budgeted five hundred dollars, but on preliminary investigation there seems to be a price gap between $300-$800. Guidance appreciated! :beers:
Watch craigs list and other sale places NO need t buy new that is for sure. IN fact the old ones are heavier built than the newer ones I feel. If you get the right one you can add a wire pull like I did and pull in conduit and plastic water pipe. Paid $50 for mine
 

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Thanks for the suggestion Tony. We've been keeping an eye on Craigslist & other local listings. There are many ads for used cat1 subsoilers - the same one that the local farm supply store sells. I don't have much confidence that this will hold up. The category 2 single shank is a much more heavy duty implement, but less common than the cat 1.
 

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Thanks for the suggestion Tony. We've been keeping an eye on Craigslist & other local listings. There are many ads for used cat1 subsoilers - the same one that the local farm supply store sells. I don't have much confidence that this will hold up. The category 2 single shank is a much more heavy duty implement, but less common than the cat 1.
Are there any local auction houses around you? There are a couple in my area where they have online bidding kind of like ebay but on a much smaller scale. They basically do consignment for farms as well as other stuff (household and restaurant) but I always watch them. I could give you the names of the places here but it wouldn't do you any good. They won't ship anything and you would have to come to pick it up. I would imagine that most parts of the country have an auction house that has gone digital in your local area. I don't know how many times I see something run through the auction site and a couple days after close it pops up on Craigslist for double the money that I know it sold for. Many times people bidding on these things don't know what it is or what it is worth. That can go both ways though. So you have to be educated on what you are looking for.

As you mentioned CAT 2 is harder to find and the price goes up. I often joke that the 2 means double the price of CAT 1. Does this mean CAT 0 is free???
 
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Imo, do whatever you have to do to get one that is as heavy duty as possible. As with any ground engaging equipment, get farmer-grade rather than homeowner-grade. Even for something you are only going to use occasionally, it will pay off by not causing you headaches later.

Buying used is also a good suggestion. There are no moving parts and only one sacrificial part on a subsoiler. A shiny paint job is the only difference between new and used so long as it isn't outright broken.

I built one identical to what tractor supply sells (King kutter?) and the first time I used it on my M, I caught a small rock and twisted it up like a pretzel. I rebuilt it out of heavier materials and with more reinforcements, and now it is sturdy enough to break tree roots.
 
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Not sure if this is worth watching for you as I don't know how far of a trip it would be for you. That said I found an auction site very much like the ones I use in the MN/WI area. There are probably others but take a look at this one.

Current Auctions - Compass Auctions & Real Estate

The one I am a member of doesn't charge a membership fee so it is worth it to sign up now just in case something comes along. There are other auction sites that charge an annual fee. Unless you are going to buy enough to justify the cost, those are not worth it. I didn't look into membership requirements for the one linked above. Really it is just an example of what I was talking about above as a possible source.
 
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Since you have the horsepower and obviously the need/use for an implement like this...
If I were in your situation, I would get an implement like in the link... You can
customize it as needed, for number of shanks and other needs..

I would not worry about the extra cost over category 1 implements, as that is apples to oranges..
Spend what you have to for the implement you need to do the job you need done.. The implement will
last a life time of use. And give the results you want...

Good luck..
==
Model 1S-28, Single Shank 3-Point Tractor Subsoiler
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the great suggestions! I think we have an online auction house nearby, I'll look into it. The Tuffline in the link is nice....but boy it's pricey! They offer both a cat 1 and cat 2 version with the single shank. It seems like a heavy duty implement, I wonder if the cat1 would be sufficient? This Bison unit looks pretty beefy too.
Iowa Farm Equipment -- Bison Subsoilers & Shank Rippers
 

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It seems like a heavy duty implement, I wonder if the cat1 would be sufficient?

Ahem.

No.

:laugh::laugh:

Voice of experience here, my pretzeled Cat I subsoiler is at Jason's. They're really not complicated implements, after I wrecked mine I started planning out just building a heavy duty one. Never did it, but it would be super easy if you or someone you know can weld. You could even have a steel supplier cut whatever shape you wanted out of heavy (1"+) plate and just have to attach the hitch bars to it. The guys at KGS Steel in Nashville have the talent, equipment and materials on hand to do it and they're not terribly expensive compared to some other Mid TN steel suppliers.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ahem.

No.

:laugh::laugh:

Voice of experience here, my pretzeled Cat I subsoiler is at Jason's. They're really not complicated implements, after I wrecked mine I started planning out just building a heavy duty one. Never did it, but it would be super easy if you or someone you know can weld. You could even have a steel supplier cut whatever shape you wanted out of heavy (1"+) plate and just have to attach the hitch bars to it. The guys at KGS Steel in Nashville have the talent, equipment and materials on hand to do it and they're not terribly expensive compared to some other Mid TN steel suppliers.

I wouldn't normally consider cat1, but the Tufline units that Wyobuckaroo linked *looks to be* very sturdy. It looks like the cat 2 version is wider (49" vs 26") and of course appropriate pin size. Both rated 30-130 HP, both constructed of 7X5 tubing.
Currently the Bison and Tufline seem to be the best fit for our use. The Bison is much more economical. The Tufline has a deeper reach. This calls for more research!
:knownothing:
 

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I don't see a price on the Bison, but I'm sure you could build one for substantially less than the $1,000 they want for the Tufline.

They both look like solid units, but I'd be nervous hooking Cat 1 tillage equipment to a Cat 2 tractor. I have a crunched up subsoiler and boxblade to show for it, but if you can go easy and don't hit anything unexpected underground you might be okay.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The quote from Bison is just under $800. We should probably stick with category 2. We'll be converting a small woodlot, expecting lots of roots & rocks underground.
 

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The shank is likely over built (if that's possible? :lol: ), but the rest of it is pretty easy to make.

I'm not sure what I'm going to use for my shank yet. I have a chunk of 1055 cutting edge that might work slick, but it's only 6" deep and 1/2" thick IIRC.
 

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004.JPG 005.JPG

He's got it set up to work with Cat 1 and 2 widths, and the little loop on the back edge is for a stand to hold it upright when not in use. Pretty slick set up. I guess he got it used after one of the mounting flanges was damaged, so he made some thicker ones to replace them.

I'm not sure where I found these, but I do remember the thread. Cross tube is 3x3x3/16" end plates are 1/2". The rest is probably 1/4"
 

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boy that pic brings back many a hr sitting in that seat watching that shank disappear in the ground, and bone jarring bouncing in the seat. that ripper tooth on the bottom their, is wore out. when we got in some bad sandstone rock, we could wear one of them out in 12 hrs. the next day before going back to work for the evening, I usually stopped at the choir practior for a adjustment. hard ripping sometimes.
 

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I've been rather impressed what grinding out a stump and then root ripping with my grapple can accomplish. My main reason for wanting a sub soiler is to deal with some drainage issues on higher ground with a bit of clay in the crust.
 

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Minimum horsepower

Thanks for the great suggestions! I think we have an online auction house nearby, I'll look into it. The Tuffline in the link is nice....but boy it's pricey! They offer both a cat 1 and cat 2 version with the single shank. It seems like a heavy duty implement, I wonder if the cat1 would be sufficient? This Bison unit looks pretty beefy too.
Iowa Farm Equipment -- Bison Subsoilers & Shank Rippers
I had to raise my eyebrows at the minimum horsepower requirements. I think they really do mean MINIMUM. We have a ripper that runs a bit deeper, probably up to 22" (I'd have to measure) and while we haven't used it for a while I do remember that in heavy soil it gave a 75-80 hp tractor all it wanted especially if there was any rock, roots etc. in the way. I have no idea of the brand and it's at least 30 years old. I agree, get plenty of steel and something that's overbuilt and you won't be cussing as much. If you don't have a backhoe or trencher, you can run a ripper twice in a line and dig a pretty easy trench for a water line because you are just cleaning out broken material with a (shudders) shovel. (You know, that think with a spade on one end and a fool on the other. Been the fool many a time and sometimes it still happens.)

Treefarmer
 
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