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We have decided to replace the carpet in our basement with something more dog friendly. I paid Home Depot $35 to come measure our basement and the guy no showed yesterday after calling me at 8:00 am to tell me that he would be at my house between 1-3. This project isn't starting off on the right foot if I can even pay someone to show up to give me an estimate.

Any advice on where to look for flooring installation? So far we have been looking at laminate flooring in the $3.00/sf range for 800-900 square feet.
 

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Flooring stores will usually have a list of installers if you don't want to go with the box stores.
I'm guessing you don't want to tackle it yourself?

I did see you say "basement" and "dog friendly". I would HIGHLY suggest vinyl plank/vinyl tile.
We did this in our basement and it is AMAZING.
While not water"proof", it can be submerged for short periods without damage.
It is amazingly resilient, we dropped a LOT of stuff on it while finishing the basement (Hammers, snips, pliers, screwdrivers, ceiling rails, etc) and never left a mark!
I even cut it with my knife accidently when cutting the ceiling tiles, quick rub over the cut and you can't see it.
The plank "clicks" together just like laminate, and has the backer already attached. I think it's easier than laminate as it's flexible so easier to handle and get together, as well as easier to cut.
The tile I used is self adhesive. Pull the backing of and place it, but word of caution, it is VERY sticky so make sure you get it right! You may not get a second chance or be able to adjust at all!
Cost is a bit more, I was right around $4/sq/ft for it in 17, but worth it IMO.
Some in progress pics, and a kind of close up. The bathroom is tile, the wood look is the plank.
 

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Flooring stores will usually have a list of installers if you don't want to go with the box stores.
I'm guessing you don't want to tackle it yourself?

I did see you say "basement" and "dog friendly". I would HIGHLY suggest vinyl plank/vinyl tile.
We did this in our basement and it is AMAZING.
While not water"proof", it can be submerged for short periods without damage.
It is amazingly resilient, we dropped a LOT of stuff on it while finishing the basement (Hammers, snips, pliers, screwdrivers, ceiling rails, etc) and never left a mark!
I even cut it with my knife accidently when cutting the ceiling tiles, quick rub over the cut and you can't see it.
The plank "clicks" together just like laminate, and has the backer already attached. I think it's easier than laminate as it's flexible so easier to handle and get together, as well as easier to cut.
The tile I used is self adhesive. Pull the backing of and place it, but word of caution, it is VERY sticky so make sure you get it right! You may not get a second chance or be able to adjust at all!
Cost is a bit more, I was right around $4/sq/ft for it in 17, but worth it IMO.
Some in progress pics, and a kind of close up. The bathroom is tile, the wood look is the plank.
I have that vinyl tile in my utility room. It is very durable and very nice. When we were doing our floor selections for our house a couple of years ago, that type of tile seemed to be growing in popularity. I almost wish we did our entire kitchen/dining area in that. It would be excellent for a basement/rec room area that has high traffic or is well used by your 4 legged buddy.

I would go to a flooring store and do everything through them if you are not interested in becoming a floor installer. If there are a lot of housing starts in your area, you may have to wait because good installers tend to have enduring relationships with general contractors and keep a steady work load. You may want to check your local CL for handy man installers and then see who shows up. Sometimes getting small business flooring companies to show up for a one off job is a challenge. I had a friend who did a big remodel on a rental property he decided to move back into and it was very hard to get his sub's to show up on time or even do the job in a timely manner. He was serving as his own general contractor so he wasn't a priority to his subs since he didn't off the allure of repeat business.
 

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Personally, we work with an independent, local carpet, flooring company and they have their own installers. Being able to deal with the store owner, who has the relationships with the installers, makes you more of a customer and less of a number. They don't offer all the same advantages of the store card like Lowe's, Home Depot or Menards, but they are still pretty competitive. I would say within 10% of the big box stores special offers.

Perhaps try this approach as the private owned stores have enough business to keep their installers busy and the service to you is better in my experience. We hear of one horror story after another with the big stores because the customers are just another number to them. No one is accountable, no one seems to be in charge and its just like cattle in the pen chutes at the self check out lines at the big stores........

Small independents are getting harder to find, but they also tend to be the choice of higher end customers because they want the good service and are less concerned about the lowest possible price. I would try some locally owned flooring stores and see if you don't get the attention you deserve. Plus the store owners are usually much more knowledgeable about products than those who work in various departments.

A handy man is also a good idea. Our former local fire chief is a handy man now and he is so busy, he is refusing work and carefully selecting the jobs he wants to do and doesn't want to do. Basically, I have found the really good handy men / handy women (don't want to be sexist here.....) don't advertise and its all word of mouth. Their work usually spreads on Wastebook like a hot rumor.......so if you know anyone active on Wastebook, have them keep an eye out for mentions of local handy PEOPLE..........
 

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A no show without a call - I would be done with them and move on.

As was suggested - seek out an independent flooring place. Usually get much better service from a Mom & Pop type outfit.
 

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As a long time contractor and now a building official I would always recommend a local vendor.Customer satisfaction thru a big box is very difficult when issues arise and frequently they are not vetted properly. Locals are getting squeezed by the change and will work hard to please you and encourage word of mouth advertising. I think that frequently the bottom line is cost comparable as well.
 

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A no show without a call - I would be done with them and move on.

As was suggested - seek out an independent flooring place. Usually get much better service from a Mom & Pop type outfit.
This and refuse the charge on your CC for non performance of the agreed upon service.
 

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I laid flooring when I was younger. I hired my basement carpet done a few years ago. Guy came by himself to do it. He couldn't even get the big carpet roll down there himself. I helped him get it down there and helped lay it all. He was the installer from a small local store. I think the owner knew I was going to be there and it was a setup.:nunu:
My son and I did the wood laminate ourselves, it's very easy. All you need is a saw, a tape measure and a couple blocks of wood. We put wood laminate around the bar and in the office. I tiled the restroom myself.
Wood laminate is surprisingly easy to install. I figured I'd replace it with tile. I haven't, it still looks like new.:good2:
 

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Good advice already given on contractors....if it were mine as you described it I would DIY with a snap lock good quality vinyl plank floating floor over a very good underlayment...it just isn't that hard
 

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Good thread....I'll especially be watching for installation updates and pics if you DIY. :good2: The spousal unit has been indicating a new kitchen floor is on the horizon by silently leaving laminate samples on the counter. I hope I can put it right over the vinyl thats there but I am wondering how I will make that work without putting the new flooring under all the base cabinets?
 

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My best friend owns about 125 rentals and also mobile home parks. He owns about half of the trailers in the mobile home parks he owns and rents the homes out. He gave up on the idea of selling or lease to own due to government regulations on the lending / finance portion of the deal and the reality that he ended up with 80% of the rent to own or financed homes back in his ownership eventually, for a number of reasons.

He uses the flooring which is shown in a couple of the pictures above in all of his rentals. Its very easy to install and very durable. In fact, when he orders new mobile homes he orders them without any carpet and installs the "floating hardwood" himself. He buys it at Lumber Liquidators and he buys a lot of it, pallets at a time.

The flooring is easy to install as his crew aren't "precision craftsman" and the general result of their installs is the floor looks good and it wears well. Now, when his tenants change, he doesn't have to deal with carpet cleaning and spots and damage. He has had a couple of pieces of the snap together flooring damaged when someone drags an appliance across it, or something similar, but normal use doesn't seem to negatively impact it at all.

By the way, the 60 minutes story in March of 2015 concerning Lumber Liquidators and their flooring products having dangerous levels of formaldehyde in the product largely turned out to be much ado about nothing. As is often the case, the company paid a "settlement" which was in the $35 million dollar range, plus fines and penalties to the government. It made a big splash in the news at the time and killed their stock price.

Since my friend has used so much of the flooring in a number of his homes, he hired a company to come in and test the formaldehyde levels in 50 of his homes which had the flooring installed. He had just gotten 6 new mobile homes in that same month and I suggested he not only test the 50 homes which had flooring installed which could have possibly had the "affected flooring" installed, but also, as an interesting "bench mark", the 6 new homes which didn't have ANY FLOORING installed (as that is how he has the new homes delivered and they install the Lumber Liquidators flooring themselves). We also added 10% of the total homes being tested by adding in older homes which didn't have any Lumber Liquidators products in them.

In Summary, the three groups of tested homes were;

1. 50 homes which had previously had Lumber Liquidators products installed in them. These homes were occupied at the time of testing.

2. 6 brand new homes which had just been delivered within the previous 30 days and had not yet had any flooring installed and had not yet been "lived in".

3. 6 existing homes, which were occupied by tenants and which had carpet and did not have any Lumber Liquidators products in them.

Here were the test results summarized.

Group 1 homes tested on average at roughly 30% of the maximum allowable limits. The homes with the Lumber Liquidators flooring which tested the highest were still well within 50% of the allowable limits.

Group 2 homes tested at or slightly exceeding the recommended levels of formaldehyde for safe occupancy. The new homes without any flooring were all at 88% to 103% of the suggested safe limit levels.

Group 3 homes tested very close to the group 2 homes.

He went ahead and installed the lumber liquidators flooring in the 6 new homes in Group 2 and had them tested again for their levels of formaldehyde. Putting the Lumber Liquidators flooring over the new homes sub floors, etc. caused the test kit numbers to be lower. The test kits were placed in the exact same locations in the 6 new homes, before the flooring was installed and after the flooring was installed.

In the end, the homes with the Lumber Liquidators hard wood flooring tested lower in formaldehyde than any of the homes which either had carpeting installed or that were newly constructed. I made spread sheet and graph of all the details at the time, which if I can find it, I will post. It's been a few years so I will have to look around for the data. But clearly, the Lumber Liquidators products he had been using certainly didn't seem to produce any levels of formaldehyde which were of concern. In fact, they tested much better than the homes which used carpeting or were full of new building materials.

Based upon the test results and findings in his homes, he chose not to join the class action lawsuit which was filed by those who had bought the product. We talked about this extensively and felt like the entire matter was unjustified based upon the actual findings in his 60 plus homes which were tested, which make up a pretty good test group. Morally, he felt the lawsuit was unjustified and unfair and he wanted no part of it and I agree..........
 

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Good thread....I'll especially be watching for installation updates and pics if you DIY. :good2: The spousal unit has been indicating a new kitchen floor is on the horizon by silently leaving laminate samples on the counter. I hope I can put it right over the vinyl thats there but I am wondering how I will make that work without putting the new flooring under all the base cabinets?
If the vinyl is in good shape you could go over the top. If you have wood trim at the bottom of the base units pry it off ever so carefully, number them and nail them back down in order when the laminate is done.

Sam's club has some nice stuff pretty cheap, if the colors meet her standards.
 

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Good thread....I'll especially be watching for installation updates and pics if you DIY. :good2: The spousal unit has been indicating a new kitchen floor is on the horizon by silently leaving laminate samples on the counter. I hope I can put it right over the vinyl thats there but I am wondering how I will make that work without putting the new flooring under all the base cabinets?
Same situation here - reading and learning as I will be attempting my first ever floor this coming winter.

Will also be going over what is there - no way I am attempting to remove the old (deleted out to avoid the code police...)

My biggest issue is I can’t be on my knees. Should be interesting to figure out how this will be possible.
 

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If the vinyl is in good shape you could go over the top. If you have wood trim at the bottom of the base units pry it off ever so carefully, number them and nail them back down in order when the laminate is done.

Sam's club has some nice stuff pretty cheap, if the colors meet her standards.
The vinyl is in good shape as far as being flat and no bubbles, it is just beat looking after being there for 25 years. I thought with an undercounter dishwasher I'd run into clearance issues replacing it if i didn't have the base cabinets sitting on the laminate? :dunno:

I am not on the decorating committee and I don't get trapped into giving opinions on how something looks. I only care that she buys it in DE so there's no sales tax. I think she'll end up getting it at Air Base Carpet & Tile, that's usually the best prices around for flooring because they'll haggle and she is very good at that.
 

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The vinyl is in good shape as far as being flat and no bubbles, it is just beat looking after being there for 25 years. I thought with an undercounter dishwasher I'd run into clearance issues replacing it if i didn't have the base cabinets sitting on the laminate? :dunno:

I am not on the decorating committee and I don't get trapped into giving opinions on how something looks. I only care that she buys it in DE so there's no sales tax. I think she'll end up getting it at Air Base Carpet & Tile, that's usually the best prices around for flooring because they'll haggle and she is very good at that.
It depends on
1) how much clearance you currently have with the dishwasher
2) how thick your new flooring is
3) if you plan on putting the new flooring under the dishwasher or not.
 

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I can also strongly recommend doing this job yourself, its very easy.
 

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As others said call your local flooring will usually come measure for free also.
If you tackle it yourself have a few sharp razor blades for the carpet. Best thing to do is rip done the carpet in 3-4’ lengths. So much easier to throw out the window or go up/down the stairs.

I agree with the vinyl for wet area and pets. It is pretty simple to install flooring. Especially if it’s more open. If you have a lot of angles and door way it may be best to let someone else do it if you’ve never done it before. You really just need a rubber hammer and a beating block.
Vinyl is not the best if you have a lot of holes and dips in your floor. Be mindful of that as you may need to repair those.
 
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