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I'm looking to buy a used equipment trailer to haul my John Deere 2320 and my dad's John Deere 750 (not at the same time) I've been looking on Craigslist but in the process started to wonder what my best choice would be. My 2320 will be trailered with the loader and ballast box during spring, summer, and fall and trailered with a 54" front mounted snowblower and rear sand spreader in the winter. My question is about clearance? Would I be better off with a tilt body trailer or swing ramp. I'm not sure if I'll have enough clearance with the snow blower raised to load it on a swing ramp trailer. Does anyone have any advise on which trailer would do the job best? Thanks in advance, y'all have always been a great help in the past!
 

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Your clearance issues may be worse with a tilt bed and the snowblower.

I would stay away from a tilt bed especially if you are using it in the winter. I had one once (my first trailer 30 years ago) and will never own another one. Even on a nice dry sunny day you have to have your timing just right to not drive off the front end of the trailer. When going up after the rear wheels are on the bed you keep creeping up waiting for the tilt to happen. Once it does it is usually quick and you have to stop right away or you will be off the front end. This is even much harder to do if the deck is slippery. I've also had traction problems with the tilt bed just getting a small L&G tractor to get up.

With a ramp tailgate trailer just be sure the ramp is long enough to not drag your implements.
 

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Your gonna want at least a 16' trailer to haul your tractor.. IMO, go with 18' or 20' so you have room to balance your load..

There are two types of trailers in the 7000GVW range, utility and flatbed (car hauler). Utilitys have rails down the sides and the deck sits a few inches lower. Flatbeds have no side rails and sit higher.

Now for the rear end, you can get 4' or 5' ramps that are like 12" or so wide, or the stand up ramp gate.. The ramp gates are safer to load/unload, but do catch air so MPGs will suffer..

IMO, for your 2320 and blower, a utility trailer with 4' gate you should be fine.. Flatbed with 4' gate might drag just a touch but you shouldnt have too many problems..

Also, make sure you get brakes on at least one axle, both is best! Should you choose one axle, get them on the rear axle.
 

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I use a 20' trailer with a 3'dovetail. I have found my 5' ramps a bit on the short side for loading 1026/54" blower. Deck height effects the needed ramp length.
 

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My Midsota is a tilt bed and it has a locking cylinder to keep it in place. It's barely angled when tilted down as well. I can't imagine ever having traction problems. It's 18 ft tilt with 6 ft fixed.
Here's a pic of mine, it's a gooseneck:
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1424830873.874972.jpg

They also make them bumper pull:
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1424830941.901972.jpg

Jim


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Im using a 16' for my 1025r with the backhoe and it fills it up pretty well. I built my own ramps and made them 8' long so i wouldnt have any clearance issues with the mower deck. Works great, but the ramps are pretty heavy. Im guessing 80 pounds or more a piece. With the loader about a foot away from the front rail on the trailer it pulls very well and seems to have just the right amount of tongue weight. I wouldnt want to go any shorter than 16'.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the advice!! I've got some searching to do!
 

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Adding to the thread

I'm not sure it's relevant to the discussion but I thought I would add to this old thread anyway. . .

My brother and I needed to move some hay bales yesterday. He borrowed a 20' utility trailer and I used my 16' flatbed. The utility trailer had a much higher GVW (12,000 vs. 7,000), was longer and he was using a larger truck. So, we expected him to be able to move a lot more bales.

We get to the loading site and it quickly became apparent that the limitation of the utility trailer was the pipe railing which sat up about 18' over the deck. While our normal 6 x 5 bales would have worked well, we were moving 5 x 4 bales, (4' long, 5' diameter). The choices were to place the bales end to end and haul 5 bales or side by side and haul 4 bales. If we placed them end to end, unloading was a problem so on the first run he hauled 4 bales.
On his second run, we did four bales on the bottom and three on top of them. With some careful tie down and driving it was ok but not ideal as the tie down straps squashed the bales unevenly and one of the top bales had more lean than I like.

Meanwhile my flatbed had 5 bales on each trip. The wheels are on the side which limited loading in that area but 5 pretty much maxed out the weight anyway.

If I buy another trailer, I think it will be a deck over with no obstructions to load items that might hang over the sides a few inches. It will shift the load point higher but might be worth it. I'll add a removable rail or sides for when I'm hauling other items but boy, it would have been nice to have a flat deck on that 20' trailer.

By the way, unloading was mostly manual. We slid a tow strap between the bales and pulled hard. I see videos of people flipping tractor tires for fun. I wish some of them had been around as 1,000 lbs of hay resembles tar baby- it just sits there! We did go get a tractor for the last double stacked load as pulling those off was just too dangerous. . .

Treefarmer
 

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I'm not sure it's relevant to the discussion but I thought I would add to this old thread anyway. . .

My brother and I needed to move some hay bales yesterday. He borrowed a 20' utility trailer and I used my 16' flatbed. The utility trailer had a much higher GVW (12,000 vs. 7,000), was longer and he was using a larger truck. So, we expected him to be able to move a lot more bales.

We get to the loading site and it quickly became apparent that the limitation of the utility trailer was the pipe railing which sat up about 18' over the deck. While our normal 6 x 5 bales would have worked well, we were moving 5 x 4 bales, (4' long, 5' diameter). The choices were to place the bales end to end and haul 5 bales or side by side and haul 4 bales. If we placed them end to end, unloading was a problem so on the first run he hauled 4 bales.
On his second run, we did four bales on the bottom and three on top of them. With some careful tie down and driving it was ok but not ideal as the tie down straps squashed the bales unevenly and one of the top bales had more lean than I like.

Meanwhile my flatbed had 5 bales on each trip. The wheels are on the side which limited loading in that area but 5 pretty much maxed out the weight anyway.

If I buy another trailer, I think it will be a deck over with no obstructions to load items that might hang over the sides a few inches. It will shift the load point higher but might be worth it. I'll add a removable rail or sides for when I'm hauling other items but boy, it would have been nice to have a flat deck on that 20' trailer.

By the way, unloading was mostly manual. We slid a tow strap between the bales and pulled hard. I see videos of people flipping tractor tires for fun. I wish some of them had been around as 1,000 lbs of hay resembles tar baby- it just sits there! We did go get a tractor for the last double stacked load as pulling those off was just too dangerous. . .

Treefarmer
This is very good advise with an good example. After paying attention to Blake's reasoning and now yours, my next trailer will be a deck over (some day there is another trailer in my future). Especially for the fact that I now have forks to unload stuff from the sides.

I had a 16' landscape trailer for years but that was when I had my little mowing business. For that the rails were handy as I mounted weed trimmer mounts, basket for gas cans, etc.

Another thing I won't have again is a full mesh ramp tailgate. The one I had stored in the vertical position. A couple times I hauled cars (VW TDI's) and the wind drag when empty was unreal. Plus the case with the newer TDI, when I got it on the trailer, I couldn't open the door to get out because of the rail. Can you picture me - 6' 1" 235# trying to squeeze out of that little window?
 

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Ianm150, I've been very pleased with my 22' PJ T6 tilt bed trailer. Based on your description, I doubt you'd need 22' but it's always best to have more capacity if you eventually add another rear implement. An 18' trailer should be just fine but do consider a 20'. It's not expensive to get another 2' of trailer.

I'm retired and not getting any younger so I simply didn't want to struggle with ramps of ANY sort. I also like the low center of gravity of my trailer and certainly don't need the added width of a deckover (although deckover tilt beds are also available). The PJ T6 has an 82" width. There are no clearance problems whatsoever when loading or unloading the 59" front snowblower on my 3720. Granted, I haven't had a need to use it during the middle of the winter but I've never had a problem with traction or any of the other issues mentioned. The hydraulic proportioning valve makes loading exceptionally easy. My Ford 3000 with 6' Woods brushog is also very easy to load, tow and unload.

I'm certainly not as experienced and knowledgable as other forum members but wanted to share my own experience if it helps. In fact, I also received excellent advice from other members that led me to my choice so this link may also be useful to you:

http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/trucks-trailers-towing/18034-trailer-advice-3720-factory-cab-equipped-front-end-loader-6-rotary-cutter.html
 

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Ianm150, I've been very pleased with my 22' PJ T6 tilt bed trailer. Based on your description, I doubt you'd need 22' but it's always best to have more capacity if you eventually add another rear implement. An 18' trailer should be just fine but do consider a 20'. It's not expensive to get another 2' of trailer.

I'm retired and not getting any younger so I simply didn't want to struggle with ramps of ANY sort. I also like the low center of gravity of my trailer and certainly don't need the added width of a deckover (although deckover tilt beds are also available). The PJ T6 has an 82" width. There are no clearance problems whatsoever when loading or unloading the 59" front snowblower on my 3720. Granted, I haven't had a need to use it during the middle of the winter but I've never had a problem with traction or any of the other issues mentioned. The hydraulic proportioning valve makes loading exceptionally easy. My Ford 3000 with 6' Woods brushog is also very easy to load, tow and unload.

I'm certainly not as experienced and knowledgable as other forum members but wanted to share my own experience if it helps. In fact, I also received excellent advice from other members that led me to my choice so this link may also be useful to you:

http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/trucks-trailers-towing/18034-trailer-advice-3720-factory-cab-equipped-front-end-loader-6-rotary-cutter.html
Looks like you have another trailer that needs to be JD green. LOL
 

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Depending on the manufacturer and the model, you may have a lot more options than you think. Why not measure the approach and departure angles of your various tractor/attachment combinations and then bring those measurements with you when you go searching?

Park the machine on level ground with the attachments raised. Put one end of a straight 2x4 against the wheel and hold the edge against the bottom of the attachment. Hold an angle finder gauge against the 2x4 and there you go! This isn't an exact measurements, but it should be close enough to work if you take a slight margin of error into account.

One thing I am going to parrot is that you should always get a slightly longer trailer than you think you need. You can always leave a little empty space on a larger trailer, but when you run out of room on a smaller one, that's it. There are so many uses for a good trailer besides moving your tractor.
 

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One thing I am going to parrot is that you should always get a slightly longer trailer than you think you need. You can always leave a little empty space on a larger trailer, but when you run out of room on a smaller one, that's it. There are so many uses for a good trailer besides moving your tractor.
Another point in a longer trailer than is actually needed is having the ability to move the piece of equipment forward and aft as needed to get your weight distribution correct. I am adamant about his - have just the right amount of hitch weight. Depending on what implements you have on the tractor this can vary quite a bit.
 

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One thing I am going to parrot is that you should always get a slightly longer trailer than you think you need. You can always leave a little empty space on a larger trailer, but when you run out of room on a smaller one, that's it. There are so many uses for a good trailer besides moving your tractor.

Agreed. My trailer has a 24' flat deck, and I really wish it was 35 or 40'. It moves this tractor fine, but larger equipment or hay runs out of room pretty fast.
 

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Looks like you have another trailer that needs to be JD green. LOL
Ha ha...because it wasn't JD green, I gave the little black trailer to my son-in-law.
 
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