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I've driven over mine for years with no issues. The last two years is with my 2720, a bigger heavier tractor. I avoid the plastic tank lid which is exposed. My tank is fairly shallow. I know because the grass over it turns brown fast if we don't get any rain.

That being said, I don't believe anybody can give you a definite answer on yours. Do you know how deep it is? What material it's made out of? Chances are you'll be ok, but I can't guarantee it. It's appropriate to use the saying "your mileage may vary."

I've also never heard of a tank failure. Ever. Has anybody?:unknown:
 

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Mine is a concrete box about 10" deep, run the 2305 over it with no issues (so far)
 

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Our ZTR mower is really close to the weight of our 2320, it's never been an issue.
As someone else asked, what is the tank materiel, how old is it?
 

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I have never had any issues driving over either the solid or liquid dosing tanks, nor the piping connecting the two tanks. I do pay "some" attention however to the drainage field. I haven't had any issues, but then again, when ground is drying in spring or after very heavy rains, I minimize going over the field to prevent unnecessary compaction. That's just me, as I tend to be overly cautious.

I wouldn't lose any sleep over it though.

Take care,
Mike
 

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I have never had any issues driving over either the solid or liquid dosing tanks, nor the piping connecting the two tanks. I do pay "some" attention however to the drainage field. I haven't had any issues, but then again, when ground is drying in spring or after very heavy rains, I minimize going over the field to prevent unnecessary compaction. That's just me, as I tend to be overly cautious.

I wouldn't lose any sleep over it though.

Take care,
Mike
We do the same. :thumbup1gif:
 

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So far so good with a 2320, but now you have me asking myself if it is worth the risk. It is not. I can mow that with the 316. If it goes bad it will cost too much. Doesnt meet my acceptable risk criteria.
 

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Septic Tank

So far so good with a 2320, but now you have me asking myself if it is worth the risk. It is not. I can mow that with the 316. If it goes bad it will cost too much. Doesnt meet my acceptable risk criteria.
The critical issue is if the tank is a shallow (gravity tank) or deep tank (pump out system). Also the material, concrete or fiberglass. I wouldn't drive over a fibreglass tank unless it is buried quite deep.

Regarding the field, a garden tractor would be best to cut grass, unless the field is very dry and can take the weight. The less compaction the better.

Jd3x
 

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My tank is only a few years old and is close to the surface (within 12" as required by code). I don't / won't drive over it with anything heavier than a riding mower.
 

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I'm not saying one shouldn't use caution, not at all. I don't go around hap-hazardously driving bulldozers over my septic system either. But has anybody ever seen a septic tank failure where it caved in? The only failure I've seen or heard of is failures within the system such as roots, clogs, pipes broken, plugged up, and installation errors. It's just that this subject comes up every so often but for the life of me, I don't know why. Has anybody seen or heard of an actual failure in this manner? I'm curious.
 

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I've never heard of a cave-in personally. My guess would be that the tanks are identified as "failing" by the pumping company or during an inspection for a sale long before the top actually collapses. In my case, that's exactly what happened when I bought the house. Previous owner had likely driven something fairly heavy over the tank at least a few times (if not regularly) and the tank showed signs of premature break-down (cracks in the walls and the top). It was replaced as part of the terms of buying the house.
 

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I'm not saying one shouldn't use caution, not at all. I don't go around hap-hazardously driving bulldozers over my septic system either. But has anybody ever seen a septic tank failure where it caved in? The only failure I've seen or heard of is failures within the system such as roots, clogs, pipes broken, plugged up, and installation errors. It's just that this subject comes up every so often but for the life of me, I don't know why. Has anybody seen or heard of an actual failure in this manner? I'm curious.


I've never seen an actual tank collapse but I have seen an old-school drywell cave in and swallow a riding mower. They used to (maybe they still do?) build a drywell by digging down 10'-12' and loose-stacking cinder blocks in a circle about 8' around. Then they'd taper them inward on the next row so that by the time you got to about 1' below grade, you had a 2'-3' open circle at the top. They'd lay a flat concrete cap on that and backfill around it all with gravel. This would all have a 4" pipe running into it from the septic tank and served the same purpose as a leach field.

Over time the blocks would shift due to frost heave and they ran the very real risk of caving in. My dad lost an old Montgomery Ward 5hp rear-engine rider down one in exactly that way back in the early 70's.

Septic tanks themselves though, are usually one-piece precast concrete with lots of steel reinforcement. Much stronger construction....
 

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I install residential sewer systems for the last 4 years and have seen 5 collapsed tanks now.
Almost fell in once in a 6 foot buried tank. Escavator took two scoops Right where I was standing. We were looking for a buried cover and the ground dropped right where I had been standing.
Sewer gases eat away the concrete.
The guy i work for tells people you get about 30 years out of a concrete tank before you need to start worrying about it collapsing
 

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I install residential sewer systems for the last 4 years and have seen 5 collapsed tanks now.
Almost fell in once in a 6 foot buried tank. Escavator took two scoops Right where I was standing. We were looking for a buried cover and the ground dropped right where I had been standing.
Sewer gases eat away the concrete.
The guy i work for tells people you get about 30 years out of a concrete tank before you need to start worrying about it collapsing
In your opinion, do any of these failures have anything to do with lawn care equipment or tractors driving over them? Or is it just a time thing?
 

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With the tanks it's just been a time thing
Your drain field on the other hand people like to drive there tractors and pickups over then and crush them.
The 10 inch sb2 pipe isn't very deep anyware from couple inches to a foot. If you have chambers there only about 6 inches from the surface and a 14inch high by about 30inch hollow area in them.
Just had a guy last week that dropped his skid loader in his chamber system and wrecked 10 feet of chamber.
We always tell everyone not to drive anything bigger than a lawn mower like a 7xx series on them.
 

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I can't drive my 1025r over my septic tank as where they are located I can't get the tractor in there. Hopefully next year I won't have to mow over the tank at all as we are going to put rock around the top of the tanks. I have a mound system for my leach field and I don't drive the 1025r over it at all. I use the push mower. Figured for what it costs to replace a mound system, the push mower and I can mow it many many times. I could use the exercise as well.
 
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