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I'm going to start out with an admission of guilt and will hope I don't get flamed for it. I've never attempted to set the pressure (or even check it) in the filled rears of my 2011 2520 turfs until about a week ago. This has led me to the realization that I don't know what the recommended process here would be.


My dealer filled the rear turfs before delivering the machine to me when I bought it in 2011. The wheels are mounted in the narrower stance position which means that the valve stems are on the inner portion of the wheel (not facing outward). The fluid level is well above the highest point that the valve stem ever sits at, so there's no chance of putting a pressure gauge on it in any fashion to check the pressure.

I fired up the compressor and set the output pressure to 22lbs and connected up the air chock. I listened to the fluid inside bubbling away as air was entering the tires, but didn't get to a point where it equalized to a point where it would stop. So, I don't have them up to full pressure and definitely need to "finish the job" but am looking for some guidance as to how to do this the best way.
 

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When I had a new set of tires installed and filled on one of my tractors,, the guy did not use a gauge,,,:flag_of_truce:

with my R1 tires, and the tractor setting on level concrete,, he set the pressure by the number of traction bars touching the concrete.
after he left, I checked the height of each rear tire,, the two tires were identical height,,
I have to say, I was amazed how identical the two tires were,, considering that no pressure gauge was used.

I wrote the tire height that I measured on the wall where I park the tractor,, so that I can check it.
I have added air once since the tires were installed a couple years ago.


So,, if the tire is too "donut" shaped with few traction bars touching,, your tire may be over-inflated,,
 

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I'm going to start out with an admission of guilt and will hope I don't get flamed for it. I've never attempted to set the pressure (or even check it) in the filled rears of my 2011 2520 turfs until about a week ago. This has led me to the realization that I don't know what the recommended process here would be.


My dealer filled the rear turfs before delivering the machine to me when I bought it in 2011. The wheels are mounted in the narrower stance position which means that the valve stems are on the inner portion of the wheel (not facing outward). The fluid level is well above the highest point that the valve stem ever sits at, so there's no chance of putting a pressure gauge on it in any fashion to check the pressure.

I fired up the compressor and set the output pressure to 22lbs and connected up the air chock. I listened to the fluid inside bubbling away as air was entering the tires, but didn't get to a point where it equalized to a point where it would stop. So, I don't have them up to full pressure and definitely need to "finish the job" but am looking for some guidance as to how to do this the best way.
when i had tubes installed in my tires-a couple yrs ago--the tire shop put 22 lbs in them, it rode like a bucking bronco. so i jacked it up-and left almost 10 lbs out-ride was back to where it had been for yrs before.

jack each side of wheel off the ground-then the fluid should be ok to do what u want-in letting the air and fluid merge without any weight on bottom-if i said all that correct:dunno:

and i thought if the valve stem was on the inside of rim-then that meant the tire was in the widest stance :unknown:if that's not the case then i've been running mine the wrong way since back too 2006
 
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I have 10 gallons of windshield washer fluid in the rears of my 2305. I have tried several pressures over the years, for me 14psi gives a good ride & traction. My loader doesn't seem to set completely level, so when using the loader a lot I inflate the right tire to 16 psi. My tires are in wide stance with the valve stems on the outside. Make sure you have the valve stems on top when checking the pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, all.

The tires are filled with (I believe) used anti-freeze. I would have to check with the dealer to be certain, though.

The fluid level is ABOVE the top-most travel point of the stem. There is no way to position it so that I get air at the stem - only fluid. I don't -believe- jacking the rear of the tractor would change this, but it might ultimately depend on just how close to the stem the fluid level actually is.

There is no way to "let air out" of the tires. With only fluid at the top, pressing the stem results in FLUID coming out and no air. So, over-inflation would require jacking up the tractor, removing the wheel, then positioning it at least partially on its side to make it so that the stem is surrounded by air. I do not have the space or the means to do that - tires are WAY too heavy to move without using the tractor to do it.

I put a fair amount of air into the tires when I had the compressor out. I noticed zero difference in it drove, rode, or "felt" under me. I did notice that the pallet forks sat very differently afterward (and that's what actually drew my attention to the rears in the first place - seemed I could not get the forks to be relatively level to each other for picking up pallets.

Given that these are TURFS, I can't reliably use things like the traction bars to determine how to set them. I don't want to buy another specialized piece of equipment unless I absolutely have to as I'm likely going to be selling the tractor within the next six months and probably won't own one again in the future (changing needs). Yes, I realize that particular gauge is pretty inexpensive, but what makes it fundamentally any different than the one I tried using? It was the same style and would not register any pressure - just let the fluid drip out.
 

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Milton makes a gauge for filled tires:

https://www.amazon.com/Milton-S-928-Water-Filled-Pencil-Pressure/dp/B0000AXBXW

Mine are filled right to the stems, that's about a 75% fill as usually recommended.

What are yours filled with?
I have one of these Milton gauges and while it is rated for liquid it is a bit of a PITA to use IF your valve stems are on the inside. The reason is that despite being a "plunger style" tire gauge, the plunger is spring loaded and does not stay out after being pressed against the valve stem. So you can not reach in, take a reading and then withdraw the gauge to read the plunger. All my other plunger style gauges stay out and have to be reset by hand - which is more convenient.
 
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If it were mine...I'd jack up the rear to get the weight off (you still want the tire on the ground however) and let fluid out till I got air.
 

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If it were mine...I'd jack up the rear to get the weight off (you still want the tire on the ground however) and let fluid out till I got air.
The problem with doing only that is that (in my case I was overfilled with rimguard) you make a heck of a mess with pressurized fluid flying all over the place. Thanks to some folks here I was directed to various methods of using an inflator hose to lower the fluid level to below the valve stem at 12 o'clock. A picture being worth a thousand words:
IMG_6855.jpg

You still need an air/fluid gauge to manage the pressure. I ruined a fancy one with Rimguard.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yeah, that's sort of my view... One major mess when I could just add air using a controlled output pressure until it equalizes and won't take any more.
 

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Yeah, that's sort of my view... One major mess when I could just add air using a controlled output pressure until it equalizes and won't take any more.

The air guage for fluid filled tires is like 6 bucks...I've got several of them so I never have to look as far to find one as I used too.


Don't use a fancy Air chuck with a guage on it or it will get trashed.

I'm glad Calcium is basicly gone. I'm sure you can still get it but why? Is it heavier by any great amount.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The air guage for fluid filled tires is like 6 bucks...I've got several of them so I never have to look as far to find one as I used too.
And they don't work like their brethren that look similar. Once you pull them off of the stem, there's nothing to read on the plunger. With the stems on the inside of the wheels, it makes it pretty difficult to use them. So, at $6 or $600 it doesn't really matter since they aren't easy to use.
 
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