Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi. First Post. Waiting for 1025R to be put together. Exciting.

I'm wondering how to set up for snowblowing. It'll have the 54" snowblower and the rear tires will be filled.

It also has a front end loader and a belly mower.

There's a slight hill going down to the garage. We haven't gotten that much snow, yet, but we can (upstate NY).

Will I need more weight in the rear...wheel weights, ballast box, suitcase weights?
I'm assuming the wheel weights would stay on year round, since they'd be a pain to change? The lawn has got a hill.

How about chains? A must? I'll be getting turf (R3) tires.

Looking for the right setup before delivery, to the extent possible.

Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,976 Posts
Have you read through the Operator's Manual for your 54-inch snow blower? It contains the following information:

Required ballast:
  • Two tire weights
To improve traction:

NOTE: Certain working conditions may be improved by using tire chains or rear ballast.
  • Install chains on rear drive tires.
  • Install wheel weights on rear drive wheels.
  • Install liquid ballast in rear drive tires.
  • Install ballast box and weight.
This is just for starters. Beyond that, everyone's conditions are different. One person will tell you that chains aren't required and the next person will tell you they can't pull out of the garage without chains. One person will say they don't need any extra weights and the next will say they need a fully loaded ballast box.

Like most of us you won't really know what works best for YOU until you have a few snow removal sessions under your belt. If you are like most of us you will find that if hills are involved and conditions are icy you are likely going to need some type of tire chain for extra traction.

My advice from someone in PA who also has the 54-inch blower and some hilly driveways is that you are ultimately going to need some rear ballast and a set of tire chains on the rear at least. Keep in mind that when the 54-inch blower is lifted off the ground it really unweights the rear tires on the tractor due to the fact that it sticks so far out the front.
 

·
Senior GTT Super Slacker
Joined
·
36,099 Posts
I'm thinking maybe I'd get a break on price if I bought the weight/chains at tractor purchase time, rather than later at the parts counter. But, who knows.
Ask the dealer to throw in some of that stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,753 Posts
I'd try your conditions without chains, first. When I had my 455, it required chains to climb an incline of pavers. Of course, wheel slip/spin was inevitable and it would marr the pavers. So I did that with a shovel. With the 1025R, I have a set of R3 turfs, like you, a dual row Heavy Hitch receiver/weight bracket with 16 * 42# suitcase weights. I seldom require 4x4 operation unless we have some ice areas on the incline of pavers. I also have windshield washer fluid filled rear tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
Wheel weights ... cheap, easy to use, and low CG weight.

I doubt, unless your drive is really steep, that you'd need to chain it up if you use turf tires on a paved driveway.

Wheel weights are absolutely not a pain.
It's two pieces of threaded rod per wheel... literally, 2 nuts each to remove the weights, two more if you want the threaded rod off the wheels too.

(My dealer threw them in with the purchase of my tractor at my request... I think they charge $70 each)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,784 Posts
With fluid in your tires id just try it. Be ready to get chains and/or some cast iron weight.

Many people like terra grips, but they aren’t great here. We get ice buildup and even metal chains struggle to get traction sometimes. Plus I’ve heard multiple complaints that the rubber chains reduce side traction, to the point tractors can spin around trying to go down or side hill.

On my 2wd x475 I have 2 sets of wheel weights, plus a couple suitcase weights 370lbs total with chains. Previously I had 420’s witch use a snowblower that weighs about 100lbs more and I used this setup, plus fluid in the tires. A 1025 is heavier and 4wd so you shouldn’t need as much. The fluid in the tires gives you 150-200 lbs by itself.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I have a 1025 with truf tires with cab, and a home made heavy hitch rack that holds 8 weights on the 3 point.
As others have stated, 2wd for better turning radius unless needed
And i do have a fairly steep portion that i dont seem to have issues with.

I would recommend trying it with out chains first, then i would add a weight bracket and weights before chains to preserve the surface.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
The current thinking here is 50 lb (plastic) wheel weights, filled tires, and terragrips.
I'll leave the weights on for my slopey lawn, and get a ballast box for front loader work, if any, lol.
Cost is always a concern, but so is value.
Edit: If the dealer delivers it like that, it could eliminate some effort and crawling around on the ground on my part.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,953 Posts
I would go for the cast iron weights instead of the plastic ones.

The plastic ones and crap.

Let's just say this comes form "experience".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
They lasted ok on my lawn tractor.
One steel 50lb'er is 140 compared with 70 for the plastic.
I might reconsider.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,953 Posts
They lasted ok on my lawn tractor.
One steel 50lb'er is 140 compared with 70 for the plastic.
I might reconsider.
When you bust the first plastic one, it will cost you the same as buying the cast ones the first time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
While the cast iron ones are super heavy duty, indestructible, and expandable... The plastic ones are not "crap".

I did a lot of really dumb stuff, dropped em taking em off, scraped em across stone walls, backed into implements, and only managed to take a couple chunks out of the plastic. I can attest to the plastic ones I had being at least 15 years old for sure, but they came with the used tractor(1988 318), and I'd guess 31 years old... they never "busted" in the 15 years I had them.

100lb (2x50) plastic costs $140 if you pay list price ($70 each).
144lb (2x72) Cast Iron starters cost $356 ($178 each)
100lb (2x50) "add on" Cast iron weights cost $280 ($140 each)

If money is not a big concern, you require absolute indestructibility, and you want to be able to expand up to 172lb per wheel later... Cast is the way to go.

If you just want to add 100lbs...there's absolutely no reason to be scared of buying the plastic ones. They will last as long as your tractor.

I'm not saying the cast aren't vastly superior... they certainly are... just saying you might not "require" that level of superiority and the associated cost. I'd spend the difference on suitcase weights that you can move around.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,953 Posts
Well sir you got better ones than I did.

Maybe the older plastic was better made.
721711
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,784 Posts
I’d look at used weights too.

2 weeks ago I could have shipped a pair of 50lb to your door for $175, but they sold locally. There is still another pair posted locally for $150. eBay usually has them for $200 a pair, there are several that sold recently at that price.

The 50 lb steel weights can also be stacked without starter weights. I have 2 on each wheel of my 420 and x475. 2 stick out about the same distance as the 75lb plastic ones JD used to offer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top