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Ken's thread reminded me of one of my safety mistake. So, here is my story.

Many years ago when I was young and knew everything, I was using an electric drill with wire brush on it with out safety glasses. As luck would have it I did feel the particle hit my eye and thought no more of it. That night when preparing for bed it felt like I just had a piece of dirt in my eye. I thought that if it is a piece of dirt it can work out over night. Well, I ignored the dirt in the eye feeling for another day, and shortly all felt well and back to normal, and was for a while. About a week later, one bright and sunny morning I could not even open my eye as the pain was to great. My eye did not physically hurt, but was super sensitive to light. Off to the eye doctor we go. Of course he then puts me in the head restraint and immediately shines a bright light in my eye. I physically had to hold my eye open with my hand for him to examine it. Then shortly after that came the eye drop, to which I could now look directly into the sun if I wanted. What he found was a piece of wire embedded into my eye that had become infected. It was a strange feeling to hold my eye open as he came at with what looked like a dental pick. I didn't feel a thing. I was lucky, no lasting repercussions from stupidity, but am the wiser for it today.\

Do not take your safety for granted. Anyone else have a horrifying safety story that they survived? Let's here your tale. I have a chainsaw one I can tell later, again young and stupid, still have the scar to prove it. Have not had these close calls now for over thirty years and I want to keep it that way.
 

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Glad you had no further problems, Randy. As the Safety Director at my work, I fight and argue with people to wear their PPE which includes, of course, safety glasses. I don't understand the reasons. My favorite is, "They look goofy". I always respond with, "If you're here cruisin' for chicks, you picked the wrong place".
 

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Glad you had no further problems, Randy. As the Safety Director at my work, I fight and argue with people to wear their PPE which includes, of course, safety glasses. I don't understand the reasons. My favorite is, "They look goofy". I always respond with, "If you're here cruisin' for chicks, you picked the wrong place".
My safety glasses are the exact same thing as my sunglasses just with clear lenses-this way I feel comfortable wearing them-except of course while operating bungee cords :lolol:

FYI: I buy usually 6 pairs of each at a time from this place-always great prices and fast shipping: Safety Glasses USA - Safety Glasses, Sunglasses, Safety Equipment

In fact I have an order on the way now...
 

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Probably the worst I've done was at the farm when my parents still lived there. I was using Dad's old JD "B" & a pickup bed trailer spraying brush along the road bank on a dirt road close to a mile from the house. The "B" died & wouldn't restart, so I walked back to the house & got the 720D with the model 80 3-pt blade. The blade was turned backwards for pushing brush, so I planned to back it up to the front of the "B", run a chain between the front wheels & lift the front of the B up & tow it back to the house. I parked the "Diesel" a few feet in front of the B while & put the chain in place. While I was on one knee putting the chain on, I heard the tires of the Diesel on the hard-packed clay road. I jumped, but not soon enough, my left thigh was caught between the blade & the front tires of the B & couldn't move anything. I was finally able to jerk free with a really bad bruise & torn britches! Recuperated for a bit, hooked the B up, lifted it & headed back to the house.

From then on, I always set the brakes!!!
 

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I'm sure I have more than I recall right now, but one of the first that comes to mind is very much like Kenny's story. I was welding, and flipped my hood up. Didn't have safety glasses on and went to chip slag off a hot weld. There are three mistakes right there- no glasses on under my hood, chipping slag by hitting it instead of scraping it, and trying to do it on a hot weld. A piece of slag flew off and hit me just a bare fraction of an inch from my eyeball, right in that soft skin around the eye. Aside from the pain, I came less than 1/16 of an inch from being blinded in one eye.

That was the last time I ever did that, but the frustrating thing is I knew better even before it happened. I was right in front of my shop, but too lazy/ complacent/ stupid to walk ten feet and get a pair of safety glasses because it would only take a second.
 

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When I was 19 I spent a summer working for a friend who owned a landscaping company. One day I was running one of the mowers (before God invented Z-turn mowers) and the grass catcher got clogged up. I throttled the mower down and disengaged the blade. I removed the grass catcher, but neglected to wait for the blades to stop turning before I stuck my hand in there to unclog it. I was VERY lucky...the spinning blade barely caught the inside of my ring finger on my left hand. It removed a small strip of skin, but that was it. Had I stuck my hand in 1/4 inch further, I would have lost at least 1 finger. I still have a scar on that finger...and this happened in 1985.
 

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I was working on the rear shocks of an old beautiful Pontiac Grand Prix we owned maybe thirty years ago. I was ignorant enough to have the car up on a bumper jack. When the whole thing started heading sideways above me I scrabbled my butt out of there just as it landed. I think I got scar tissue on my heart from the scare.
 

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Damn! My heart skipped a beat just reading that.
 

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My 9 lives were gone before i turned 21. Ive used 9 more since then. There was always a disreguard for a basic safety principal, usually just one. It was always a personal project, or recreational activity.

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Ok ive got one to share, my fault but i wasn't in danger myself.

Mowing a lawn at what was a local gass station. With the old chute guard, that was just a step. No a discrage damper. I hit i butter knife in the grass while someone was pumping gas into a pickup truck. I hit a butterknife appatently. The guy came over yelling waiving his arms. I shut it down to hear. He was pointing at his truck. I saw the smashed left slider glass, and after walking over with him i found the butter knife to the right of his rearview stuck in the windshield. Based on the angle it pretty much flew over his filler cap. How close to his head? The stations insurance covered it but i was never rehired. I was lucky i didnt kill someone. It still keeps me paranoid about discharge, ill run if im in the output direction of another mower, and may wait 5 minutes to make the one outbound pass in front of my house until no cars are there just incase

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Ken's thread reminded me of one of my safety mistake. So, here is my story.

Many years ago when I was young and knew everything, I was using an electric drill with wire brush on it with out safety glasses. As luck would have it I did feel the particle hit my eye and thought no more of it. That night when preparing for bed it felt like I just had a piece of dirt in my eye. I thought that if it is a piece of dirt it can work out over night. Well, I ignored the dirt in the eye feeling for another day, and shortly all felt well and back to normal, and was for a while. About a week later, one bright and sunny morning I could not even open my eye as the pain was to great. My eye did not physically hurt, but was super sensitive to light. Off to the eye doctor we go. Of course he then puts me in the head restraint and immediately shines a bright light in my eye. I physically had to hold my eye open with my hand for him to examine it. Then shortly after that came the eye drop, to which I could now look directly into the sun if I wanted. What he found was a piece of wire embedded into my eye that had become infected. It was a strange feeling to hold my eye open as he came at with what looked like a dental pick. I didn't feel a thing. I was lucky, no lasting repercussions from stupidity, but am the wiser for it today.\

Do not take your safety for granted. Anyone else have a horrifying safety story that they survived? Let's here your tale. I have a chainsaw one I can tell later, again young and stupid, still have the scar to prove it. Have not had these close calls now for over thirty years and I want to keep it that way.
Randy -

During my working days for America's favorite Oil Company, BP, we got on a risk assessment kick for most projects, small and large. The spreadsheet matrix that was developed had probability of an incident occurring on one axis and severity of the outcome on the other. In essence, if there were a one in 10 billion chance that a paper cut would result in the Macondo disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, then we would run the probabilities and mitigations into the ground. We developed contingencies for problems real and imagined; this simply and sadly was part of the process and ignoring the process was frowned upon.

In the early 1070's, I witnessed a late family friend attempt to remove sawdust and other debris from a buck saw pivot mechanism attached to an IH "H" tractor via a flywheel belt. The stick that our friend used to remove chips on the buck saw pivot became trapped via the blade tooth; and thus my friend lost his right pinky finger. It was a lot for a pre-teen like me to witness and absorb, but it taught me that few jobs were so urgent as to ignore basic safety and common sense.

On my next post to this thread, I'll regale you with the amateur fireworks incident from last evening. No eyes or digits were lost; hopefully memories were made .

Brian
 

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lawmower

Probably 30 + years ago I was mowing the lawn with a push lawmower with at most a 4 hp engine. It had a chute and as I went by a pine tree, I felt something hit my left foot. It stung pretty good and I figured that the mower had picked up a rock, thrown it which then bounced off the tree into me. Finished cutting the lawn and when I went into the house it was still hurting so I took my shoe off. There was a small spot on the inside of my ankle. My wife insisted that I get it checked so off to the ER we went. X rays showed about an 1 1/2" of wire (maybe old coat hanger wire) had gone into my ankle, hit the bone and bent into a U shape against the bone. Unfortunately the ER doc on call wasn't much of a surgeon and it took him a while to find it so I have a nice T shaped scar that still occasionally itches. To this day, I try to mow to throw grass away from trees and hard surfaces.

Treefarmers
 

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Damn! My heart skipped a beat just reading that.
That's one way to date me, remember when cars had bumpers strong enough to hold a car up?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
WOW! What great stories guys. All great safety lessons. Thank you for sharing. :thumbup1gif:

Keep 'em coming gang.
 

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Seeing as this is a tractor thread I guess you don't want to hear about my Amish days pole vaulting. :laugh:
In 2003 I bought my first 4x4 tractor, it was a 2210. Having the 4x4 made it so I could mow where before I couldn't. While mowing one day in unknown territory with the mower chute raised I hit a full sized brick. I didn't see it nor did I hear it. I did hear my wife yelling at me, above the mower noise I might add. I shut the mower off and shut down the tractor to see just what she was yelling for. She proceeded to tell me about a brick that was stuck in our living room window and pointing a finger at it. Well I had to see why someone threw a brick into our window and asked her why and who did that. She informed me that I did that. "Did I do that?" I told her I couldn't have as I was mowing. She said "exactly, you did it mowing". We had just put in brand new windows in this house when we bought it in 2000. The double pane type with gas in between the 2 panes. So I went and looked at the window and brick. It went through the screen and the outside pane of the window. No big deal, inside pane still was intact and it was insured. Wife didn't think it was "no big deal". I still can't figure out why I didn't hear it or feel it. This brick flew about 20 feet and about 10 feet up in order to hit that window. I catch myself watching what I mow and have noticed that I tend to keep the mower chute down way more then I did before. I've had to replace my wife's back window on her Crown Vic one time because I was weed-eating in the area and didn't move the vehicles. Tend to be way more careful weed-eating around vehicles too. When I start questioning myself when mowing or weed-eating I just tell myself "heck with it, just move the vehicles". Can't move the house so I just watch so I can see when I do damage to it. Can't stop mowing just because a house is there. Right?
 

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circular saw mishap

Well, I almost hate to even think of this one but it did occur when I was around 24 years old. Burned out my circular saw cutting a very thick piece of sugar pine for a mantle so I borrowed one off a guy that was working next door in a development. His blade guard did not have a spring on it and it didn't work as expected too. I needed to get what I was doing completed for the masons so I said no problem I tend to hold the guards up anyway to do plunge cuts until the saw is embedded into the wood so here I go back to the thick piece of pine again. That saw backed out so fast and dug itself into my hand and arm totally stopping the blade in the process before I could blink an eye.. I took the saw out of my arm and witnessed all the little white tendons and things like my thumb hanging by a thread but no blood at least for a moment or two.. I knew I was in trouble big time, and then it started.. Blood everywhere, wrapped my arm and hand in crappy junk cloths and luckily was only two miles from the Athol hospital.. Ended up getting 34 stitches, arm in a sling and a month off from work,,, it was my own business, that killed me.. It didn't hurt just felt like I got punched in the arm/hand.. My lesson and to all who witnessed this,, never use a tool where the guard does not work or has been fooled with.. The guy who owned it threw it in the trash, (said it had bad karma now) accidents do happen no matter what you have always done,, and if I had my own saw the guard would have prevented my unfortunate accident,, It cut my index knuckle in half but it still works to this day I was very lucky to say the least... Still have the scars to provide me a memory of what not to do.. Stop and go buy another tool if it has been compromised not worth asking for trouble in my opinion.... Guards are there for a reason not to be overridden. Yes there are times a table saw has to have the guard removed but anyone who does this practice, and I know I have done that throughout my career, takes very special care in doing so.. it only takes a split second to do damage..
 

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Man.. some real good ones! Thanks Randy for starting this thread.
As a life long and 3rd generation wrench turner many a story to be told!
Other than the stupid sheet we did in the Army one comes to mind.
I worked for a large outfit and they had a Kubota L4 series tractor. I had the bucket off doing new bushings and pins. I needed to raise raise the bucket to line up the pins. So I reached over and hit the key to start it. Well.. unknown to me the neutral switch had been bypassed. Away she went. My left leg was against the right tire. It tried to drag me under. I was fighting that plus trying to shut it off and steer it past a 69 truck I just got done restoring. I let her go into the pallet racks. It collected up my spotless snap-on tool box with the left rear tire. I got it shut off. I had a large Hickey from my hip to ankle.
Morel of the story.. never crank a tractor without being in the seat.

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Jeff Taylor, there is not many things more unsettling than having a good look at your own inner workings eh? Wow, I've cut myself open a few times but that sounded pretty savage. I don't know how Dr's and med students handle that.
 

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Jump starting

Man.. some real good ones! Thanks Randy for starting this thread.
As a life long and 3rd generation wrench turner many a story to be told!
Other than the stupid sheet we did in the Army one comes to mind.
I worked for a large outfit and they had a Kubota L4 series tractor. I had the bucket off doing new bushings and pins. I needed to raise raise the bucket to line up the pins. So I reached over and hit the key to start it. Well.. unknown to me the neutral switch had been bypassed. Away she went. My left leg was against the right tire. It tried to drag me under. I was fighting that plus trying to shut it off and steer it past a 69 truck I just got done restoring. I let her go into the pallet racks. It collected up my spotless snap-on tool box with the left rear tire. I got it shut off. I had a large Hickey from my hip to ankle.
Morel of the story.. never crank a tractor without being in the seat.

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I don't remember the model number but sometime in the 1980s JD had a model with a hydrostatic transmission. I knew two farmers who died jump starting those tractors. Apparently when the starter cranked there was no movement in the tires until pressure built up and then the tractor would lurch forward. In both cases, the rear wheel went over them. I guess they were left "in gear" and since it was a relatively new tractor the farmers didn't realize the danger. They were about 40 miles apart and it happened within 6 months of each other. There's a reason for those safety switches.

Treefarmer
 

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I don't remember the model number but sometime in the 1980s JD had a model with a hydrostatic transmission. I knew two farmers who died jump starting those tractors. Apparently when the starter cranked there was no movement in the tires until pressure built up and then the tractor would lurch forward. In both cases, the rear wheel went over them. I guess they were left "in gear" and since it was a relatively new tractor the farmers didn't realize the danger. They were about 40 miles apart and it happened within 6 months of each other. There's a reason for those safety switches.

Treefarmer
Yup.. that was my case as well. Once she built pressure away it went. Scary sheet.

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