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Let me know if you think this is sturdy enough. :munch:

Building my 10'x14' shed in the near future. I was planning on going with a slab but we got a lot of rain recently and found my entire lot floods like a retention pond so I need to get my shed up in the air, the old one had 10 inches in it... YUCK! :thumbsdown:

I was thinking of doing 12 concrete piers in a 4x3 pattern so no span is more than 5'. The piers will be 48" deep, 42" in the ground so they are to the frost line and 6" above to prevent water damage. I was planning to use 2x6s for the floor joists with 3/4 plywood for the floor using 16" OC construction. Do you think this is beefy enough to park my 750# lawn tractor on? Also do you think I need and if so what size support beam to run under the 2x6s and sit on top of the concrete piers? Or should I just beef up the 2x6s and skip that level? I cannot find much online about this, it is a popular deck construction method but people do not really park their lawn tractors on their decks! :laugh:

I would like to keep the shed floor construction as "slim" as possible so I don't have to build I giant ramp while obviously having it off the ground so I am keeping as much of the bottom dry as possible. :good2:

Thanks,

John

P.S. Not a professional by any means but I am having it built by one. I just like to do my homework beforehand!
 

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Taking a second look, I believe I only need 6 piers and sinking them a full 48" in the ground. Then use pressure treated lumber to build up the floor a foot above ground level. 2 6x6s laid across the piers then 2x6s on top of that as the floor joists.
 

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It all sounds like a good plan, maybe if you can post a picture of the location we could visualize it a little better.
 

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I think I would notch out treated 6X6's posts with a skillsaw for a treated 2x10 all the way around the perimeter and then double them up using lag bolts into the 6X6 posts and nailing them in-between posts.

Use metal hangers to attach/hold 2x10 floor joists.

Then nail a pair of treated and centered 2X10s the length of the floor to the bottom of the floor joists and put a solid cinder block under them for center support. If the floor ever were to get springy just drive the center support shim wedges in farther.

Also I would use all treated lumber to eliminate bug problems and use those metal braces between the joists to stop any twisting from the tractors weight.
 

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An 8" - 12" x 48" concrete pier at each corner should be more than adequate. I like the idea of a 2x10 rim joist, and 2x8 floor joists 16" O.C. If you go with a 2x6 rim joist, then two extra piers midway along the long side may be needed.

Personally I'd rather go with heavier framing than drill post holes and work with concrete.
 

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Hey John,

:think: I am a little confused as to why you wouldn't solve your drainage problems first? After that your building is simple. :unknown: I myself would much prefer a concrete slab.
 

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2 6x6 skids along the perimeter edge, with standard 2x6 joists 16" o.c. on top of that. Standard floor, should work just fine. If you don't want to do the piers you can do shallow gravel trenches under the skids - it's done all the time, and then the building qualifies as "temporary" - which may lower your taxes but hurt your insurability.

750# sounds like a lot until you think of 4 adults standing together having a conversation - same weight in the same area.

You may want to double up on the plywood, just as you'd put in a subfloor in a house.
 

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Hey John,

:think: I am a little confused as to why you wouldn't solve your drainage problems first? After that your building is simple. :unknown: I myself would much prefer a concrete slab.
I cannot. I am at the bottom of the hill so in a major storm everyone's water drains to me. I drain to the river via a concrete tunnel under the road. It is a bottleneck that the county will do nothing about. So basically my lot is the retention pond before final drainage. My neighbor to the west shares these duties with me, sadly they have a basement and received 10 inches of water.

Here are some photos after the storm we just had, mind you this was a doozy and is not an everyday occurence. I have 1/3 of an acre and almost all of it was underwater.









 

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I love the rim joist idea and that can easily be added. 2" of gravel with a moisture barrier is the minimum code. I have every intention of going over code because I want it to last. My goal is to have the floor 12" above ground level, everything treated from the floor down. Our frost line is 42".

I will read through everyone's ideas and see what I can work in.

Thanks!

Also attached is a quick MS paint drawing of my lot and drainage. Across the road is a "forest preserve" that the water dumps into. Gravity pulls it down to the river so to speak. The roads around my lot are all higher so it creates the retention pond effect. Our storm sewers are just ditches that pass in front of my lot then down the side to go to the tube under 83.
 

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I cannot. I am at the bottom of the hill so in a major storm everyone's water drains to me. I drain to the river via a concrete tunnel under the road. It is a bottleneck that the county will do nothing about. So basically my lot is the retention pond before final drainage. My neighbor to the west shares these duties with me, sadly they have a basement and received 10 inches of water.

Here are some photos after the storm we just had, mind you this was a doozy and is not an everyday occurence. I have 1/3 of an acre and almost all of it was underwater.
Geeesssshh John I was unaware you live on a flood plain. :lol: If that were me I would be pestering the township and the county until someone fixes it. Between you and your neighbors complaining and the photos you have I wouldn't think it would take too long. And if it is a county issue your township should be willing to help you out. Good luck with the shed build, looks like you are getting some pretty good advice. :good2:
 

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The funny thing is it isn't a flood plain in the eyes of the government, flood insurance not required. They don't want to fix it because it would involve closing Route 83 to traffic, so it won't be done until it is due for a complete repaving. My neighbor works for the streets department, you would think he has pull, and still nothing.

Oh I should point out it is not a city road, nor a county road (which I believe I stated above), it is a state road. IL has no money so it is what it is forever... LOL

Looks like getting the floor up a foot will be just enough to prevent water in the shed and the treated lumber should be able to handle that just fine. Especially considering how infrequent that amount of water is.

And thanks! :lol:
 

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I ran some of this by our structural engineer and he said the 2x8's run on 16" centers would be the minimum.
Thanks for getting the OP this info Brian, and it made me feel better that my guess of using 2x8's for the floor joists was right.

The funny thing is it isn't a flood plain in the eyes of the government...

And thanks! :lol:
No surprise there. It's too bad you couldn't build a berm and swale system to channel the water towards the edges of you property to direct the flow around your house and shed.

What's ironic to me is the name of the town you live in.
 
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