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I m in the early stages of shopping for an additional sidewalk snow removal tractor. I currently have a 4115 with a 47" blower--more on this in an additional post. I m looking to buy a machine that can run the 47" blower with a drop salter on three point and can have a cab but is shorter and more nimble than the 4115 but not sacrificing too much in the power department.

My first inclination was a 1025r, but the turning radius is very similar to my 4115 and it lacks split brakes. I did some looking into an x739 aws, but my dealer tells me don't do it--not diesel, and too many moving parts to get in the salt. He suggested an x758 which is basically a stripped down 1025r. I m not finding good comparative data as far as turning radius between the two machines. Based on JD's website the x758 turns almost like the AWS which I find hard to believe. The 1025r now has the new drop on cab option and the money is pretty close to the same.

This machine might mow my home lawn in the summer and maybe aerate in the fall--I m not sure what 3 PT aerator would work on either of these choices. Winter is the primary concern--nimble power with minimum machine length. Thoughts?
 

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I use a Meyer BL240 behind my 1025R and it works very well. I see in your signature you seem to have a blower for everything. I use a 60" blade on mine and I am very happy with it. Good luck. :good2:
 

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I m in the early stages of shopping for an additional sidewalk snow removal tractor. I currently have a 4115 with a 47" blower--more on this in an additional post. I m looking to buy a machine that can run the 47" blower with a drop salter on three point and can have a cab but is shorter and more nimble than the 4115 but not sacrificing too much in the power department.

My first inclination was a 1025r, but the turning radius is very similar to my 4115 and it lacks split brakes. I did some looking into an x739 aws, but my dealer tells me don't do it--not diesel, and too many moving parts to get in the salt. He suggested an x758 which is basically a stripped down 1025r. I m not finding good comparative data as far as turning radius between the two machines. Based on JD's website the x758 turns almost like the AWS which I find hard to believe. The 1025r now has the new drop on cab option and the money is pretty close to the same.

This machine might mow my home lawn in the summer and maybe aerate in the fall--I m not sure what 3 PT aerator would work on either of these choices. Winter is the primary concern--nimble power with minimum machine length. Thoughts?
The 3 point is standard equipment on the 1025R and about a $900 plus up charge on the x7xx series. Plus the x7xx series will require a rear PTO addition, which is about another $800 to $1,000 depending upon labor costs, pricing, etc. Having the rear PTO and 3 point hitch standard equipment on the 1025R gives it a real price advantage over the x7xx when one has a need for these functional items. If mowing is the primary function, then the x7xx is a great machine. But when you have a need for a FEL and a rear PTO and 3 point hitch, then the 1 series is a great value.

The Yanmar diesel is a great engine and comes in both the X758 or other diesel models and the 1 series. I personally have used both the Gas engines and the Yanmar and would ONLY own the Yanmar, given the choice. The engine torque is better on the diesel and torque is precisely what you need to run the PTO to operate the snowblowers. Plus the engine efficiency and extended life of the diesel make it worth the additional initial purchase cost. If you were to resell the tractor with the diesel, you will recoup the extra cost initially spent to upgrade to the diesel. Overall, I would stick with the diesel engine when given the choice.

Perhaps you can elaborate on the "turning issue" you mention. Do you have lot's of 90 degree corners in the sidewalk? Please explain the turning issues you are dealing with....and the ideal solution for your needs.

The 1 series is a better value with the rear PTO, 4 wheel drive and 3 point hitch all standard, where these are all up charges on the X7xx series. The cab options on the 1 series are more varied and you can select anything from a $800 soft sided cab with no options all the way up to the $5,800 glass cab with heat and front and rear wipers and other valuable options.

I have plowed and blown snow for 20 years using a 455 diesel, which is the predecessor to the x7xx series. I find it's ability to maneuver easily and in tight areas makes it's operating efficiency very good. However, because of the need for the rear PTO for a salt spreader and the 3 point hitch, along with the 4 wheel drive options and the front end loader, I am going to be switching to the 1025R soon.

I don't think you are going to find split brakes on anything hydrostatic driven which is green in color and it's going to be difficult to find a new(er) SCUT in the color green which isn't hydro statically driven. While the split brakes are ideal for 180 to 360 degree "spinning" it's also hard on the surface where you are locking the inside wheel to make the turn. In a field, I wouldn't and haven't given it a second thought, but I wouldn't want the tire scuffing on pavement nor risk turning up gravel, etc. in a driveway when blowing snow just because it's likely to result in putting those loosened items through the blower, which has risks of it own.

Any 3 point aerator which will fit the category 0 three point will work. There are extensive threads on this site about the numerous aerators sold by various manufacturers which a quick search in the GTT search bar will bring to the forefront for you to review.

Welcome to the GTT site. There are a lot of really fine people on this site and a few of the rest of us..............:laugh:
 

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I have a 1026r with the 54" blower. The 1025 is basically the same tractor. While my set up works well I wouldn't want any less hp on the 54" blower when dealing with heavy wet snow.
 

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I was in a similar situation as you and echo much of what SulleyBear posted. I sought to move to something with AWD or MFWD to gain some added pulling power on the front wheels. With so many attachments, that is where a lot of the weight ends up, including a snow thrower. Having been a 455 AWS owner for many years, I also desired to retain AWS and, of course the diesel. So that lead me in search of an x749, which, of course, JD discontinued in 2012. So I had been looking for a low hour used unit for over a year and with a cab, as nobody manufactures a hard side cab for that tractor any longer, either.

Well, when I did find one, which was rare, they were well north of $10K and weren't on the market long. So I dropped the idea of a cab, still north of $10K equipped with just a mower deck. I started doing the math to add the 3-point and the rear PTO. I was within just a few dollars of a comparably equipped new 1025R.

So it was a compromise. The 1025R does corner very sharply. In fact, I'm pretty confident the angle the front wheels can achieve is much greater than my 455s. I believe the increased turning radius is more related to the increased wheelbase length. That is one of the things I like about the 1025R, the increased wheelbase yields a much roomier operator station, which is more comfortable and easier to climb on/off. So that is a big plus I hadn't considered when I "compromised' from an x749.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
further explanation

see further info in quote in red

The 3 point is standard equipment on the 1025R and about a $900 plus up charge on the x7xx series. Plus the x7xx series will require a rear PTO addition, which is about another $800 to $1,000 depending upon labor costs, pricing, etc. Having the rear PTO and 3 point hitch standard equipment on the 1025R gives it a real price advantage over the x7xx when one has a need for these functional items. If mowing is the primary function, then the x7xx is a great machine. But when you have a need for a FEL and a rear PTO and 3 point hitch, then the 1 series is a great value.

The Yanmar diesel is a great engine and comes in both the X758 or other diesel models and the 1 series. I personally have used both the Gas engines and the Yanmar and would ONLY own the Yanmar, given the choice. The engine torque is better on the diesel and torque is precisely what you need to run the PTO to operate the snowblowers. Plus the engine efficiency and extended life of the diesel make it worth the additional initial purchase cost. If you were to resell the tractor with the diesel, you will recoup the extra cost initially spent to upgrade to the diesel. Overall, I would stick with the diesel engine when given the choice.

Perhaps you can elaborate on the "turning issue" you mention. Do you have lot's of 90 degree corners in the sidewalk? Please explain the turning issues you are deali<script id="gpt-impl-0.25382010334954163" src="https://securepubads.g.doubleclick.net/gpt/pubads_impl_115.js"></script>ng with....and the ideal solution for your needs. Many 90 degree corners and several locations have sidewalks that have obstacles to maneuver around

The 1 series is a better value with the rear PTO, 4 wheel drive and 3 point hitch all standard, where these are all up charges on the X7xx series. The cab options on the 1 series are more varied and you can select anything from a $800 soft sided cab with no options all the way up to the $5,800 glass cab with heat and front and rear wipers and other valuable options.

I have plowed and blown snow for 20 years using a 455 diesel, which is the predecessor to the x7xx series. I find it's ability to maneuver easily and in tight areas makes it's operating efficiency very good. However, because of the need for the rear PTO for a salt spreader and the 3 point hitch, along with the 4 wheel drive options and the front end loader, I am going to be switching to the 1025R soon. spreader is electric actually and only requires cat 1 3 pt hitch and a good connection to the battery as well as a functional alternator........

I don't think you are going to find split brakes on anything hydrostatic driven which is green in color and it's going to be difficult to find a new(er) SCUT in the color green which isn't hydro statically driven. While the split brakes are ideal for 180 to 360 degree "spinning" it's also hard on the surface where you are locking the inside wheel to make the turn. In a field, I wouldn't and haven't given it a second thought, but I wouldn't want the tire scuffing on pavement nor risk turning up gravel, etc. in a driveway when blowing snow just because it's likely to result in putting those loosened items through the blower, which has risks of it own.

Any 3 point aerator which will fit the category 0 three point will work. There are extensive threads on this site about the numerous aerators sold by various manufacturers which a quick search in the GTT search bar will bring to the forefront for you to review.

Welcome to the GTT site. There are a lot of really fine people on this site and a few of the rest of us..............:laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I know the feeling....

I have a 1026r with the 54" blower. The 1025 is basically the same tractor. While my set up works well I wouldn't want any less hp on the 54" blower when dealing with heavy wet snow.
we have the 47" on the 4115 which is similar in HP to a 1025 and we clear between 3 and 4 miles of sidewalks and growing. We had one storm in March with 32" and you did have to go slow but it did it. I can't imagine the 54" would have gone too well on my machine during that storm--would have been too much pushing....
 

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The 1025R has a 40 amp alternator as standard equipment. My 455s only had a 20 amp alternator and that was one of the reasons why I never installed cab heaters (just being out of the wind was usually enough). If you go the X route, you may want to check into the alternator size. With the amount of time you spend in the cab, you'll wan the heater, aux lighting, and your spreader.
 

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This is posted in a previous post on GTT.
http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/10971-turning-radius-x758-vs-11025r-post99142.html#post99142
Tractor data has the 1025r turning radius at 2.25 feet and the x758 at 2.08 feet.
I have a 1025r and since last summer use a x738 once or twice a week ,before that a x485. IMO I can't tell any difference in turning radius between the two machines. When you price the series1 compared to x7XX with diesel and all the add ons ..are you really saving money not IMO. As I stated you still have a lawn and garden wanting or trying to be a Sub Compact.
As SB pointed out about the cost to add 3pt and rear pto . plus with series1 you get H and L range . Hyd quicker on series1 , both very close to same size.

Have had a sub compact for past 11 or 12 years before that JD425 .
 

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I used to own an x758 and now have a 1025r.

The turn radius is pretty much identical, *if* the 1025r is in 2WD, which it is not going to be in the snow. HDAP tires are better in the snow, in my experience, than R4s, though not much. They do take chains better since the chain sits on top of the tread whereas with the R4 a small part goes between the lugs and does nothing. Are you going to notice the difference? Probably not.

If you are getting a *dedicated* sidewalk snow removal machine, and you don't need it to do anything else, I recommend an x758 with a three point. x758s are priced with the deck, whereas the 1025r is priced without the deck. So if they can sell it to you without the deck, it would be cheaper.

If you think you're going to want to do other things with it, I'd get that 1025r. Unless that other thing is mowing, in which case the x758 kicks butt.
 
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I have been thinking this too....but without a demo

I'd ignore the dealer and go with your first thoughts, X739, you won't find a more nimble tractor than that. No need for split brakes when you have 4 wheel steering with all wheel drive.
I know the steering will be top shelf---the concerns I would liked input on are

less torque of gas vs. diesel
fuel consumption under snowblowing load---I need 4 hours run time minimum
many moving parts in a salty environment....longevity, maintenance etc?

anyone with this input--probably needs to move over to the garden tractor forum.......
 
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I know the steering will be top shelf---the concerns I would liked input on are

less torque of gas vs. diesel
fuel consumption under snowblowing load---I need 4 hours run time minimum
many moving parts in a salty environment....longevity, maintenance etc?

anyone with this input--probably needs to move over to the garden tractor forum.......

If it helps...the engine in an x739 is a Kawasaki.

I have a Kawasaki four wheeler from 1999 that runs like the day it was made. I would not hesitate to trust a Kawaski engine.
 
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I know the steering will be top shelf---the concerns I would liked input on are

A. less torque of gas vs. diesel
B. fuel consumption under snow blowing load---I need 4 hours run time minimum
C. many moving parts in a salty environment....longevity, maintenance etc?

anyone with this input--probably needs to move over to the garden tractor forum.......
A. & B. I can tell you that running the 47" two stage thrower in my 455 diesel consumes about 3 quarts of fuel per hour in the winter. Plowing and not using the PTO reduces the fuel consumption per hour by about a pint. So, with a 5 gallon tank you should get 6 hours or more of operation time. You will be ready to get off and stretch your legs and refill your coffee cup long before you need to refuel the tractor. The various x7xx tractors all have at least a 5.2 gallon tank on them as far as I have seen.

I never run my diesel tank below half tank in the winter and I always refill it at the end of the days use so it is not setting half empty so it is ready to go at 3am the next day when I need it. I also run the diesel fuel conditioner year around in my fuel. It serves as a lubricant for the injector pump and also prevents moisture related issues as well as gelling. NEVER RUN ALCOHOL fuel additives in diesel, as it dries out the fuel and causes wear in the injector pump. Those "Rescue 911 Additives" should be a last resort when stranded and NEVER for routine use.

I personally like the Howes Fuel additive but the Lucas is also a good product.

https://www.amazon.com/Howes-103060-Diesel-Conditioner-Anti-Gel/dp/B001JT3I0U/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1493729870&sr=8-4&keywords=diesel+fuel+conditioner

A. I have a neighbor who has a Kawasaki engine x73? with the 47" two stage blower, the same blower I use. With snowfall depth less than the front height of the snowblower intake (probably 12" to 15", I haven't actually measured it) I can blow snow at a much higher ground speed than my neighbor. He has to stop and allow the tractor to "catch up" and then he can resume forward movement.

One snowfall, he wanted to compare the two when he first got his tractor new. We started in the unplowed street in front of his home and by the end of 300', I was at least 100' ahead of him. He had gone back and forth on whether to spend the extra money for the diesel and finally decided to NOT spend the extra $900 to $1,000 difference in price at the time. I know if you were to ask him now, he would opt for the diesel engine in a heart beat.

My diesel is north of 3,000 hours and knock on wood, the valve cover has never been off the engine and the engine has never been opened up for any repairs. Under the hood, I have replaced two alternators, several batteries, one fan belt and a thermostat, two fuel shut off solenoids and one electronic control module and ignition switch in 20 years.

C. One the hydro end, which is going to operate in the slop and crud and corrosion of the snow melt product environment, I have replaced all of the seals and rebuilt the entire drive assembly and replaced the PTO clutch discs. Other than the PTO Clutch discs and seals and RTV sealant, I have not replaced any gears or other "hard parts". The X7xx series uses the very well tested Tuff Torq K-92 (or similar version) rear drive assembly and it is extremely reliable and well constructed. If you service the Hydro fluid and use the correct low viscosity fluid from Deere (I buy it in 5 gallon buckets along with filters each February during Deere's annual fluid and filter sale) you should have no problems with the drive line in the tractor. Do not get tempted to use "cheaper" fluids as the Deere low viscosity fluid is what the machine is designed to operate with.

I can tell you that I raced Top Dragster and Pro Mod and Street Raced (NMCA, Street Racers Association, etc) for decades so when you are in that sport, you will learn extensively about drive line stresses and the need for quality gears / axles / bearings to handle the 2,000 plus Horse Power we would throw at them. When you launch a 3,000 lb car from a dead stop and have enough power to reach 180 mph in just 660 feet (215 mph in the dragster at half track, 255 mph at the finish line), you are putting serious stress on drive line components.

The drive line quality and size of the gears and axles shafts, carrier bearings, etc., in the Tuff Torq rear end of the K-92 caliber are very heavy duty. While I have seen some chip ring gears in a small range of serial number tractors, it is fairly rare and usually happens when people are really beating on the drive line hard. Plowing snow will tend to break more drive line components than running the snowblower ever will. But running the snowblower and PTO in heavy wet snow conditions for long periods of time will result in some wear over time on the PTO clutch discs.

You should still get 2,000 hours or more of use out of the PTO clutch is you run the right fluid (it's a wet disc clutch and the entire PTO clutch assembly operates in hydro fluid at all times) and start the PTO at low idle and then bring the engine RPM's up. I see so many who push the throttle to wide open and THEN engage the PTO clutch. It's best to avoid unnecessary stress on items and turning the PTO both ON and OFF at lower engine RPM's will certainly let it live much longer.

C. (Continued) The rock salts and similar snow melt spreads are very hard on the foot wells where you track it back onto the tractor whenever you get on and off. If you have a way to rinse or wash off the unit when done, it would be advisable to do so after every use. If nothing else, at least clear all of the snow, etc. off of the foot wells before putting the tractor away after use. If you have a cab, it is even more important as it will rot the foot wells and the bottom of the cab when it melts from the cab heater and remains on the surface.

Regarding the actual blower itself, Other than keeping the components well greased and I spray all of the blower components with a corrosion resistant lubricant which dries. There are probably several on the market. Also keep the blower chain properly lubricated and keep a spare chain with master link in your tool kit so when you need it, you can replace it and resume blowing snow quickly. A lot of snow accumulates on top and the "control" area of the blower from it coming out of the chute and just blowing around the entire snow blower area.

No doubt the sand, road salt and other corrosives are very hard on components. But short of staying out of them entirely, trying to rinse them off the tractor and blower when finished with it's daily use along with keeping everything exposed to the corrosives well greased and lubricated is the only way I know to deal with it.
 

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If dealing with snow is your main concern then I'd move over to something that is built for it better then most. Take a look at Ventrac and all that they have available for their tractor. From what you have said they have what you need. Short turning, snow blowing, cab, spreader, diesel, take a look. I don't mean to take you away from JD but if you're not doing things that people do with the 1 series or the X700 series then the Ventrac is the way to go. The one draw back for me is they don't have a rear PTO and I don't like a tiller on the front of my tractor. My brother has the Stiener with cab and loves it. Stiener and Ventrac are basically the same tractor. For where I live the Stiener/Ventrac is the way to go for all my mowing needs, for most everything else I need a tractor that operates like a tractor. Ventrac even has a stump grinder now for their tractor.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
so I went that way first.....

If dealing with snow is your main concern then I'd move over to something that is built for it better then most. Take a look at Ventrac and all that they have available for their tractor. From what you have said they have what you need. Short turning, snow blowing, cab, spreader, diesel, take a look. I don't mean to take you away from JD but if you're not doing things that people do with the 1 series or the X700 series then the Ventrac is the way to go. The one draw back for me is they don't have a rear PTO and I don't like a tiller on the front of my tractor. My brother has the Stiener with cab and loves it. Stiener and Ventrac are basically the same tractor. For where I live the Stiener/Ventrac is the way to go for all my mowing needs, for most everything else I need a tractor that operates like a tractor. Ventrac even has a stump grinder now for their tractor.
I ve demoed the Ventrac and it is a nice machine and well thought out. It's more money and I don't have the dealer support and without significant investment into "their" attachments it's pretty much a one season machine for me. I have a full stable of JD products and my dealer is good to me and if something goes down in the night we just text in, switch rigs and keep going. I need this for what I am doing so staying with one dealer helps them invest into my success rather than a piece with this dealer, two pieces from that dealer etc. I did like the Ventrac, but at the end of the day branding of my company and the dealer support wins out.
 

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there's a new 1 series factory cab, but it seems to be about a 5,000 dollar option, don't know if that deters you from it. the quick hitch used on the 1 series is really made for the smaller lawn tractors, and wears quickly on the larger SCUT and CUT tractors, the weight of the SB54 apparently hogs out a few holes quite quickly. I can only imagine that the 3pt on the 1 series lifts higher than the x700, giving you a bit more spreading capacity. the x700 has ho ROPS, in case overhead clearance matters anywhere. the 1 series' weight gives it a bit of an edge in the traction department (with the right tires! HDAP or turf if you're only working in snow and lawns). personally, i'd lean towards the 1025r
 
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