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I have not but then again I would never put concrete around a wood fence post.
 

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I have not but then again I would never put concrete around a wood fence post.
I haven't done much fence work, personally. In our area, though, it is common to do the corners and any posts on either side of a gate. I wonder, though, if this would be sturdy enough to support a gate. I have also used concrete around mailbox and bird feeder type posts. We have enough freeze thaw heave around that I feel this helps keep thinks solid. I seldom mix the concrete. Sometimes I don't even add water, I figure nature will take care of that.

I just thought this was an interesting approach to the problem.

Lee
 

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I haven't done much fence work, personally. In our area, though, it is common to do the corners and any posts on either side of a gate. I wonder, though, if this would be sturdy enough to support a gate. I have also used concrete around mailbox and bird feeder type posts. We have enough freeze thaw heave around that I feel this helps keep thinks solid. I seldom mix the concrete. Sometimes I don't even add water, I figure nature will take care of that.

I just thought this was an interesting approach to the problem.

Lee
The product info says it’s not for use in structural applications, I’d call gates, fence corners and just about any building application ‘structural’ because of the forces and weight transferred to the post and the post foundation. Line posts, mailboxes, etc should be fine...
 

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Seems a bit expensive to me. $12.00 for a bag to do one post vs. $3.50 for a 60 lb. bag of concrete mix.
They are claiming it is the equivalent to Two 50# bags in volume. That said, I normally only use one bag for a mailbox post.

I don't disagree that it is more money, but there is a lot to be said for speed and convenience. I will pay a premium for that sometimes. I don't have any upcoming projects to test this out, but may try it on a future project.
 

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The product info says it’s not for use in structural applications, I’d call gates, fence corners and just about any building application ‘structural’ because of the forces and weight transferred to the post and the post foundation. Line posts, mailboxes, etc should be fine...
That does seem counter-intuitive. Dirt will hold the post (as Keith said). Maybe this is useless?

Lee
 

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That does seem counter-intuitive. Dirt will hold the post (as Keith said). Maybe this is useless?

Lee
If you give it a try, post your experience! It does sound interesting and I could see it being useful in some unusual circumstances, I'd love to hear how it performs. But doesn't seem like an everyday replacement for concrete though.
 

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My Brother-inlaw works construction. When he came and worked on my shed they just put a bag of quick-create in dry around the post before he filled and tamped the dirt back in. The ground water will harden the concreate at the base of the post.
Hope this helps.
 

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That does seem counter-intuitive. Dirt will hold the post (as Keith said). Maybe this is useless?

Lee
I think the advantages are speed and labor savings. With Concrete mixed or poured dry around a post and topped off with dirt or dirt/gravel packed back around the post to set it there is considerable effort and time invested in setting them.

With this, while there may be slightly more cost there is production to be gained and or simply more speed toward completion with less overall effort. To some in the correct application that is well worth the additional $.
 

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I think the advantages are speed and labor savings. With Concrete mixed or poured dry around a post and topped off with dirt or dirt/gravel packed back around the post to set it there is considerable effort and time invested in setting them.

With this, while there may be slightly more cost there is production to be gained and or simply more speed toward completion with less overall effort. To some in the correct application that is well worth the additional $.
I agree, I am sure there are people who will embrace the technology and convenience. The funny part is, their cute little video show the advantage of bringing home the equivalent of a pallet of concrete mix in the trunk of a compact car. This sounds good, but you still need to get the posts home.

I like technology and am quick to leverage it where I think I can benefit. My father always claimed I was part of the Polaroid generation. He may be right, I like some things to be quick and convenient.

Lee
 

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It's a most excellent product for my mailbox post. It works well. I think the post is quite sturdy. Fences and gates? Maybe. I want to put in my own fence in a year or two. I have the tractor to haul stuff around, and might do the post hole digger thing.

IMO, the foamy stuff will work well to support fenceposts, as I believe almost 100% of the product makes contact with both the post and the sides of the post hole. Thus, the load is spread over an optimal area. It's also my belief that I don't want to schlep concrete all over my yard, and put up with the dust, hauling water around, ect. Gates? Probably.

Plus, I'm getting old. Like, if I was a dog, I'd be dead by now old. The foamy stuff is light, and works quickly so I don't have to brace poles, or shovel a lot of dirt back in. More better for my back!

It's only drawback is cost- adds up quickly for many posts. Enough so that if I spent a bit more, I could hire a crew to do it all, and I could watch from my window.
 

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Okay, so background again:

Posts were driven in straight into the dirt by the prior owners. Posts began to wobble, especially in the middle sections of the fence. One actually snapped in a windstorm, if you look in the lower left you will see a brace. Poured that Sika stuff in the gaps created by the post wobbles, straightened them all out and got rid of most of the play. I poured the Sika stuff almost a year ago. Made it through one winter, will report back on long-term performance.


 

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I have used a similar product called secure set. They sell it on amazon......I would say it is a little bit more commercial use. There website shows a lot of industrial applications. I used it to set 2 4x4x8ft post 4 feet deep for a meter structure on a farm. Sets up very quickly and holds fairly well. Wouldn’t say that it is as good as concrete but did the job. Cost wise was about the same as buying bags of mix but the time was probably less than a 1/3 as long as i5 would take to mix bags in a small mixer.
 

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I have not but then again I would never put concrete around a wood fence post.
Why not? I have done it many times with no apparent issues so I am curious as to your reasoning. It was I was taught when building a wooden fence or putting a post in the ground so if I was taught wrong, I might as well learn the correct method.
 

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Why not? I have done it many times with no apparent issues so I am curious as to your reasoning. It was I was taught when building a wooden fence or putting a post in the ground so if I was taught wrong, I might as well learn the correct method.
It ends up being a moisture trap.
 

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It ends up being a moisture trap.

In more ways than one. Concrete will absorb water and “give it” to the wood and the concrete acts as a bathtub catching and retaining water around the post.

If you watch Holmes (TV builder and remodeling for home issues out of Canada) one of his cardinal rules for building is to never let Concrete touch wood.

If Concrete is used as a support for wood posts it should only be used as a flat pad to set the post on, the fill around it should be granular (sand or stone) so it supports but drains water. Giz has also tried some alternatives like Perma columns (?) I think that help with this issue.
 
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