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After 2 years of working with the front loader on my 2720, I'm looking to improve my snow removal methods. I have a gravel driveway and end up picking up a fair bit of gravel even when I try to leave ~2" of snow. I'm considering using my rear blade (RB1060) rotated around (yeah...I know, not good for the neck) as a pusher equipped with skid shoes at the highest setting.

Your experience and recommendations using this setup are appreciated.
 

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I've done it both ways and I don't like either option. I put a plow blade on my loader and it works very well.
 
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With my older JD855, and FEL, I have found I move the bulk of my snow with the 5' back blade....
Then use the FEL to clean up and pile the snow...

Here is a picture of the skid shoes I built for my blade... The body of the shoe is flush with the bottom of a new blade... The 1/4" plate welded to the bottom of the skid is a sacrificial ware plate, that keeps me from digging gravel as I move snow... The sacrificial plate is 1/4" x 2" x about 4"... They have run 3-4 winters now, and have about that much use left in them...

Not pretty or complicated, but useful....

Good luck
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BackBladeSkid.jpg
 
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The problem with any kind of skid shoes is that unless the gravel is frozen the skid shoes will have a tendency to dig in and still let the blade gather gravel. Even more so if your stones are a few inches deep.

For the past 28 years clearing multiple gravel drive ways with a rear blade (9N and 2720) I find the most effective technique is to leave the blade facing forwards and push backwards against the curve of the blade. This really minimizes the tendency for the blade to dig in. By doing so it still gives the option to scrape forward if you encounter packed snow or ice to loosen it up.
 

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I did, but found they didn't prevent gravel from being picked up along with the snow.
Were you using two or three tamers? When I tried them I initially had only two and found the center of the bucket would still sometimes gather gravel on uneven ground. Once I installed a third tamer in the middle of the bucket that problem was eliminated.
 

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The problem with any kind of skid shoes is that unless the gravel is frozen the skid shoes will have a tendency to dig in and still let the blade gather gravel. Even more so if your stones are a few inches deep.

For the past 28 years clearing multiple gravel drive ways with a rear blade (9N and 2720) I find the most effective technique is to leave the blade facing forwards and push backwards against the curve of the blade. This really minimizes the tendency for the blade to dig in. By doing so it still gives the option to scrape forward if you encounter packed snow or ice to loosen it up.
i haven't tried the edge tamers yet. For 12 years I "plowed" by angling the bucket, in essence I figure liike one large Edge Tamer and floating the bucket. I put a WoodMaxx SB in service last year reversing the cutting blade, again like the Edge Tamer and set the skids to ~2" of relief, the skids are shaped like Edge Tamers with about half the surface area. I still get tear-out.

I like your idea of "plowing" with the back of a back blade, some might refer to it as back dragging, I haven't tried it yet as I just got the blade and haven't mounted it yet in place of the rake on my 3046 . How much packed snow does it leave vs. push, and how effectively does it windrow. Do you really push it or do you turn it around and drag it?

Just to clarify the SB is mounted on a 2520 and I intend to mount the blade on a 3046R; leaving the bucket in front for pile clean-up and back dragging.
 

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I like your idea of "plowing" with the back of a back blade, some might refer to it as back dragging, I haven't tried it yet as I just got the blade and haven't mounted it yet in place of the rake on my 3046 . How much packed snow does it leave vs. push, and how effectively does it windrow. Do you really push it or do you turn it around and drag it?

Just to clarify the SB is mounted on a 2520 and I intend to mount the blade on a 3046R; leaving the bucket in front for pile clean-up and back dragging.
By pushing against the curve of the blade I am usually able to clean down to where I see gravel showing through. I typically do it this way because if I leave any kind of "base" it usually just melts down and forms solid ice. With the gravel showing the Sun will melt it bare. I have a hydraulic angle control on my blade and can windrow perfectly in any direction.

I always push backwards with the blade facing forwards. The way my hydraulic cylinder attaches I can not pivot the blade 180-degrees without changing the attachment for the cylinder.

The only time I drag the blade forward is if needing to dislodge ice or hard pack snow.
 

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I have been grading my gravel driveway for 40 years now. For heavy snows I have found that using a rear blade at an angle to push the snow to one side and driving forward I can do a good job with minimum gravel displacement. I adjust the top link shorter to get the blade in a straight up position or angled backward to prevent it from digging in. I always start on one side and grade the snow to the other side. The second pass pushes it farther over and the 3rd pass usually gets the snow off the drive to the side I am pushing it to. I don't use any skid plates or anything else on my rear blade.
For light snows or rain erosion, I use a box blade with the rear blade lower that the front blade to smooth the gravel in 1 pass. (or more) Or sometimes I use the rear angle blade facing backwards as mentioned in this thread above.
 

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I put a plow blade on my loader and it works very well.
I too use the snowplow blade on the loader. I like larger surface area skid shoes to float on gravel. I have the shoes set with the blade high. I keep the crushed stone level. I also prefer the gravel to be packed in with 2 inches of snow and frozen.
 

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The problem with any kind of skid shoes is that unless the gravel is frozen the skid shoes will have a tendency to dig in and still let the blade gather gravel. Even more so if your stones are a few inches deep.

For the past 28 years clearing multiple gravel drive ways with a rear blade (9N and 2720) I find the most effective technique is to leave the blade facing forwards and push backwards against the curve of the blade. This really minimizes the tendency for the blade to dig in. By doing so it still gives the option to scrape forward if you encounter packed snow or ice to loosen it up.
Completely agree.

I (again) have a gravel driveway, and after several experiences similar to Jason’s, I retracted the skid shoes on my back blade. And ... since my back blade has hydraulic angling (nice!), I can’t easily turn the blade backwards as I did on my smaller tractor, out of necessity I found that pushing backwards with the blade facing forward works pretty well in many situations.
 

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This brings up a question, why don't you drive forward with the blade facing backward? Then you wouldn't have to be looking back and backing up. Or am I miss reading what you posted? Going forward with the blade facing backwards would be "pulling" the blade backwards, which I do sometimes when the snow is light. That turns over the gravel when there is ice on the driveway.
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Completely agree.

I (again) have a gravel driveway, and after several experiences similar to Jason’s, I retracted the skid shoes on my back blade. And ... since my back blade has hydraulic angling (nice!), I can’t easily turn the blade backwards as I did on my smaller tractor, out of necessity I found that pushing backwards with the blade facing forward works pretty well in many situations.
 

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This brings up a question, why don't you drive forward with the blade facing backward? Then you wouldn't have to be looking back and backing up. Or am I miss reading what you posted? Going forward with the blade facing backwards would be "pulling" the blade backwards, which I do sometimes when the snow is light. That turns over the gravel when there is ice on the driveway.
It is always best to not drive over the snow prior to plowing it. When it is wet it will pack solid and be near impossible to scrape clean. Also, if the snow is deep it just ends up piling up between the blade and tractor.
 
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I've all ways plowed backwards with the blade facing forward. Alot easier to control & your not pulling up your driveway when plowing & have piles of gravel in yard. Especially if the ground isn't froze yet. I also got edge tamers on my bucket. Just set it level, put it in on float & go.
 
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