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For the past few years I have been plowing my concrete driveway with a 54" blade on the X485. The cutting edge is urethane and the driveway is concrete. During this time I have used the factory skid shoes with no problems. Since the skid shoes were wearing out I replaced both the cutting edge and added the Heavy Hitch skid shoes that they make for the 54" blade. These are much more heavy duty and should last longer.

The problem is I'm not happy with the Heavy Hitch skid shoes. They are louder then all heck to the point my wife can hear the banging and rattling from inside the house even if I'm at the road. The skid shoes are about a 1/4 above the cutting edge but anytime you hit a bump in the driveway, road, grass etc they vibrate and rattle like there is no tomorrow. I often plow snow at 4 am and I guess if my wife can hear the noise the neighbors may as well.

Today I had enough and removed the skid shoes. I'm back to nice and quiet. That leads to the question. Are the skid shoes necessary? I know if the cutting edge gets too low I will wear out the blade itself but I monitor that each year as I am putting it away.

The downside is Heavy Hitch charges an arm and leg for these skid shoes that are now junk to me. If anything I will go back to the factory skid shoes which still means the heavy hitch is heading to the garbage. .
 

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I'm not speaking from experience because my driveway is gravel but if it were blacktop or concrete I don't think I run shoes.
 

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As long as you keep an eye on your cutting edge, the shoes aren't needed on a paved driveway.

Oddly enough, I was just looking at my 54" plow earlier today and noticed that the Heavy Hitch cutting edge I installed is pretty much shot after being used for ONE snow storm. Between that and you're questioning their shoes, I'm less than impressed with their products at the moment.
 

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Take the shoes off. You don't need them on a hard surface. They are made to install lower than the cutting edge. So the plow scraps up less stone and grass.

You have to keep an eye on the wear edge no matter what it is made of. Once the plow metal hits you do damage quick.

List the used shoes for sale. Some one will snap them up.

What's the wife doing in bed while you are out working? Unless she has a good insurance policy on you? When we had the 30"+ a while back. The neighbor went out to shovel in front of the truck. Within seconds he was rolling on his back like a turtle. Looking out my window I said to my girlfriend. I don't think he's going to get up. So I called his girlfriend and she called 911. They ended up hauling him to the hospital. They barely got the ambulance in and out of the trailer hood.
 

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The idea of the shoes is to take the brunt of the wear so the blade last longer.The shoe should be adjusted so the blade just touches.You should see a little day light under.
Being new the bottom is rounded and doesn't have a flat spot init yet.
The other problem is the shoes have adjustment holes so it's hard to get the proper setting.The CTA blade has the right idea with the stacking of washers,so as the shoe wears you lower the shoe and save the blade. Scroll down the page you'll see the pic.
- Compact Tractor Snow Plows - Compact Tractor Attachments
 

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The idea of the shoes is to take the brunt of the wear so the blade last longer.The shoe should be adjusted so the blade just touches.You should see a little day light under.
Being new the bottom is rounded and doesn't have a flat spot init yet.
The other problem is the shoes have adjustment holes so it's hard to get the proper setting.The CTA blade has the right idea with the stacking of washers,so as the shoe wears you lower the shoe and save the blade. Scroll down the page you'll see the pic.
- Compact Tractor Snow Plows - Compact Tractor Attachments
This is how and the reason why I have my 48" plow set up the same way. I'm running the JD heavy duty shoes.
 
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The idea of the shoes is to take the brunt of the wear so the blade last longer.The shoe should be adjusted so the blade just touches.You should see a little day light under.
Being new the bottom is rounded and doesn't have a flat spot init yet.
The other problem is the shoes have adjustment holes so it's hard to get the proper setting.The CTA blade has the right idea with the stacking of washers,so as the shoe wears you lower the shoe and save the blade. Scroll down the page you'll see the pic.
- Compact Tractor Snow Plows - Compact Tractor Attachments
Thats the main reason I went with the CTA blade. My 92 420 l&g has a 54" blade and I went thru several of the Deere skid feet. When I bought my 1025 I said no way to the 54" blade from Mother Deere and went with the 60" CTA blade. I like it because it's taller, wider,& has real skid shoes. It hooks up to the Deere quick hitch and wasn't much more than Deere. I am very happy with it. :good2:
 
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I know this is an old thread but I had the same question. I just purchased some round, adjustable skid shoes for my 54" blade thinking I could get them positioned better than the stock, JD shoes. The original ones were either too high or too low. With the adjustable ones, I can set them at any position.

Then I started wondering if I need them at all and what they were really doing for me? I have a very smooth, paved driveway (1 year old) and a rubber cutting edge on the front blade. Other than turning the shoes into metal shavings, what do I really need them for? Now that I read this post, I'll move them up so they don't contact the driveway. At least they'll stay nice an new!

Here are the adjustable shoes I bought. Made in USA:

JD_Blade_Adjustable_Skid_Shoes.jpg
 
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I would adjust them to just above the rubber edge doing your nice driveway and drop them down on other nasty unknown stuff to save the rubber strip. Plowing snow becomes a art and as you do more you get good at it and find all the short cuts. Snow is wet, dry and damp all 3 move different. The dry stuff is nice with a touch of moisture to keep the powder down. Wet snow and a snow blower sucks no matter what you do and a rear blade will run circles around it when it is wet.
 

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On pavement or frozen ground I don’t use them. I do have a pair of high flotation ones I use if the ground isn’t frozen.
 
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