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Maybe not "Tractor & Equipment" related, but definitely related to "Safety" so I posted here :good2:

Currently all 50 states (only DC does not) have enacted some form of "Move Over" laws in the effort to protect police and emergency personnel, highway maintenance workers, construction workers, utility workers, tow truck drivers and even just someone changing a flat tire or broken down. Did you know about this?

If you don't know about or are not familiar with this, please visit: Move Over America | Protect Law Enforcement Officers . While that site is dedicated to the LOE's the laws help protect other workers as well. More info by state: Move Over Law - AAA Digest of Motor Laws

Now, one of our main suppliers, B/A Products serves the towing industry in large part, so they have focus in on the tow truck drivers mainly-as does this video but all workers on the roadside deserve the respect of drivers and the right to go home to their families. Here is very touching video they produced and asked us to help spread the word, and we'd appreciate if you would help as well with friends and family:

 

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Press Release:

Over the years, providing safe and quality products remained at the core of B/A’s mission as well as pushing the boundaries for new innovation. This was the crux of B/A deciding to go beyond the safety built within the products to the roadside itself. Raising awareness about the dangers of the roadside to the general public has been a concern at the forefront of this industry for years. Despite the Move Over Law being passed throughout the USA, many Towers, Police Officers, Fire Fighters, EMT’s and other Roadside Workers continuously lose their lives to preventable mistakes by unknowing drivers.For years B/A has been creating products to help increase visibility of those on the road along with using ads and social media to raise awareness. This year, B/A wanted to do more. The B/A creative team felt they could help the public see and feel what it’s like to be on a busy roadside by putting them in the shoes of a Tower and what they might experience on any given day. Throughout a simple short story, we see all first responders working together and putting themselves in harms way to help an accident victim beginning to end.


By focusing on the loud whooshing sound and gusts of wind as cars fly by at close proximity, the viewer starts to feel the stress and realization of how easily someone could be killed with one wrong step to the left. The video demonstrates how a small courtesy provides a necessary buffer and allows a young Father and Husband to safely return home to his family at the end of a hard workday.


The video ends on a positive note, showing how when one person moves over, it creates a “lead by example” chain reaction where others behind the initial person slow down and move over. Most of the general public are unfamiliar with basic roadside dangers. However, it is human instinct to identify and sympathize with a young couple wanting to see each other home safely and that is how B/A intends to capture the hearts and minds of the viewers. When B/A’s Executive VP was first approached with the idea for creating this video, his response was: “If this can help one person move over one time and it saves one life, it was worth it.”


B/A Products sincerely hopes this video makes such an impact that we see a new appreciation of first responders and roadside workers through the simple acts of slowing down and moving over. If we can develop a new mentality where more people serve as an example to those in the car behind them, we can finally pay it forward to the men and women who risk their lives each day for each of us.
 

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Always seemed like common sense to me to move over when anyone or anything is on the roadside.

A young man, operating a roll-back making a recovery was killed on Route 81 north of Scranton late this past summer.
 

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I will profess to knowing this requirement and practicing it. Also a year or two ago they made law in my state that if it is raining you must have your lights on. A quarter of the people on my roads don't do it. I think nearly every time I am driving in low visibility conditions such as rain, snow or fog there is ALWAYS several morons on the road with no illumination.
 

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A couple thoughts. First great reminder. This weekend heading down to mass there was a stop in progress. With most cars in the right two lanes everyone in front and behind that a saw moved over leaving the right lane empty. It was smooth and polite. I was shocked everyone reacted. We have our share of idiots the only traffic problems i had on the way back were wearing maine plates.

The second is the day i got my truck i was running south on a 2 lane 70mph highway at night bringing it home. I hit a moose walking from the middle into my lane. I only saw it feet away, and just ducked over swerving with a steep embankment to a rock outcropping. It spun around landing in the fast lane. I pulled well past it slowing down gradually knowing i didnt want a bottle neck. My buddy who gave me a ride north pulled up behind to check on me. I yelled im good go put lights on the moose. He didnt umderstand. Got out and came over. As im patiently but fully stressed telling him to back up amd put lights on the moose to show it a vw passat came along and moved over around the hazzard lights and hit the moose. The car got about 5ft of air, landing with struts coming out the hood and trunk. It slid to a stop in the left lane......theres your bottleneck..... The moose slid over to the breakdown lane and my buddy finally went and put lights on it until cops arrived. Then i had to get 2 tow truck as the cops directed my first one to get the vw. I dont blame them a bit. That was what was needed.


The moral of the story is be slow and cautious in adjusting.

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Rydpirs, we don't have them moose down here but from what I hear or have read their hair doesn't really reflect light back at you if they end up in your headlights?
 

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Rydpirs, we don't have them moose down here but from what I hear or have read their hair doesn't really reflect light back at you if they end up in your headlights?
The eyes dont either. Thats the biggest problem, deer and dogs do. Anything else is a gentile speed bump. We dont have aramadillos
I got to see the eyes from about 10 feet looking right at me. I honestly thought of my dog. Hed react the same way.



Dewey is short for dufus. He hear's you and understands commands well. But the first time you tell him he just turns to look at you and i hear in the voice of Tennessee tuxedo, "whatcha sayin boss, drrr" the moose had the same slow stupid look on his face turning from his straight ahead 20 degrees off from mine. Just as i saw it, it turned to look with no other reacaction.. Drrrr. Bam. 1/2 a jaw landed in my lap along with my mirror, then it took 2-3 seconds for the glass dust to clear, and i didnt get up off the consol until i stopped and had it in park. It was 6-800 lbs. A large young adult cow.

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Good reminder. As a fireman/paramedic with I-75 going threw our area, it is scary having to work on an road of any kind and an Interstate is twice as bad. I hate going out there every time a call comes in. We literally take a deep breath ever time we get an accident or a vehicle fire, and have had more close calls than I care to count. Last winter one of our Engines was hit twice, the second time was just a week after it was back from the first incident. One of our command excursion was totaled last year also. I could go on and on.
I like to go home so slow down and move over. You don't want that ticket in Michigan, I think it 2 points and like $400.

Oh ya I just heard on the news that they are talking about raising the speed limit on I-75 :banghead::banghead::banghead:
 

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I will profess to knowing this requirement and practicing it. Also a year or two ago they made law in my state that if it is raining you must have your lights on. A quarter of the people on my roads don't do it. I think nearly every time I am driving in low visibility conditions such as rain, snow or fog there is ALWAYS several morons on the road with no illumination.
IMO the worst standard eqpt on a vehicle is Day Time Running Lights (DTRL), along with auto lights. DTRL you have no tail lights, almost a great idea just one step more and require the tail lights to come on along with DTRL. Second thing is with automatic lights they don't turn on soon enough . Meaning in a rain or snow storms they won't turn your lights on . The Subie has a option and I use it if the wipers are on your headlights come on...

I'm done.
 

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CO state trooper just lost his life not to far from me because the trucker didn't slow down or move over.

I hated setting up traffic control when I worked for Bell in CA. That was before all the texting.




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People literally take their life in their hands when they have to work alongside a roadway these days. These laws are well-intentioned and need to be strictly enforced, but the real problem is the congestion on our roads, at least in my area. Every year the number of vehicles on our roads increase but the roads themselves stay the same.

Too often when you come upon something on the side of the road it's a given that you can't move over unless you want to take out the vehicle beside you. And there is probably someone tailgating you so that you are in real danger of being rear-ended if you try to slow down. It's a no-win situation.

There is no way I would even try to change a flat tire on the side of the road anymore. And I really sympathize with all of the people who must be out there for their job. They deserve hazard pay.
 

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This is just another one of those things where people don't have common sense - and need a law to show them. Don't get me wrong - I am all for this.

While I was aware of moving over long ago, it really hit me once I started driving big truck on the big roads - and of course broke down at times. I'll tell you what - that is one of the most scary things I endured with that job - being disabled on the shoulder of a busy 65 mph highway.

If you are standing in the right spot, a big truck going past you ~8' away, the wind itself could knock you off your feet. So for me, it's not only for LEO, tow trucks, etc., but for anyone stopped on the shoulder - I do whatever I can to move over. And if I can't I slow way down.

People are stupid - even "professional" drivers. One night I was broken down on I-71 in Ohio below Cleveland. I was there from 11pm until 1:30am until the tow truck finally got there. Now the highway at this point is 3 lanes in each direction and relatively flat and straight. And at that time of night the road is basically empty. But time and time again - here comes a big truck in the right lane and right past me actually rocking my truck. Why the heck didn't they move over? Most times when this happened there were no other vehicles anywhere near these trucks.

Anyway - good reminder for everyone.
 

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In Indiana you are required to move over if traffic allows. If traffic does not allow you must reduce speed by 10mph below limit or lower depending on traffic conditions. I have had my emergency vehicle side swiped while stopped with all lights activated last winter. You could be amazed at how inattentive and distracted the general public is when it comes to driving.
 

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If I see a breakdown along the side of the road I slow down, put my flashers on and move over. If it's not a multiple lane highway but rather one lane in each direction, I leave the flashers on for a short time after passing the break down.
 

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Scares the sh%t out of me when I've got to pull over for any reason on the interstate.
Last time I broke down, I pulled off the road at least 8'. While waiting on the tow truck I
sat there for about 5 minutes while the wind off passing vehicles rocked my van. I said
the h#ll with this, got out and hopped over the guardrail and waited there.

Happens way to often, and I just couldn't sit there like a hog to slaughter.
Now throw in texting, drivers on drugs and alcohol, and raising of the speed
limits, and you've got a deadly situation.
 

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Back in'78 when I started to drive truck it was a no brainer. You moved over because...
1- If a person walked around the front of their vehicle to get to their driver's door mostly they had to step into the right lane, right into your grill if you didn't move over.
2- It was considered being courteous.
That pretty much gives you the safety factor. Ask someone why you should move over and they probably can't give you reasons 1 and 2. All they'll do is look at you stupidly and say "safety?", in a question form. I remember doing Drivers ED our instructor telling us when driving at night and an oncoming vehicle with the lights on and you can't see, always look at the white line on your side of the road. Always worked for me. One time my Mom was driving and this happened and she got blinded by not looking away and I had to grab the wheel to keep us from going head on into the other vehicle. She just drove toward it. We would have lost that battle, the other vehicle was a 10 wheel gravel dump truck. After over 2 million miles of driving that is the one I'll never forget.
Don't know if this is fact or not but I heard that in Tn. if you use your wipers you have to have your lights on. Whether it is or not, it's what I do.
 

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Yes Levi, it's the law here that if your wipers are on, lights must be on. DRLs don't count.
 

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Yes Levi, it's the law here that if your wipers are on, lights must be on. DRLs don't count.

Same in WV , and I believe the surrounding states.
 

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CO state trooper just lost his life not to far from me because the trucker didn't slow down or move over.

I hated setting up traffic control when I worked for Bell in CA. That was before all the texting.




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Yep always hated doing flagging in my case ,most of the time only for a few minutes of helping someone with a road crossing. Now with texting there is no way.

I didn't ask the girl yesterday if she was texting, my wife was telling our daughter tonight she thought for sure she was going to pull out and then she stopped..:dunno: may have been texting :dunno: may not.:dunno:

Texting has probably become the biggest distraction on the road today. Yes I worked the communication field for my career , But being able to text while behind the wheel of a vehicle needs to be stopped. The only way will be through technology the way it was started. :dunno:
We have smart cars, lets come up with a smart phone that cannot be overridden that stops texting if setting with a steering wheel near person holding that phone.:dunno:
 

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Maine law:

B.*At any time when, due to insufficient light or unfavorable atmospheric conditions, including, but not limited to, rain, freezing rain, fog or snow, persons or vehicles on the way are not discernible for a distance of 1,000 feet ahead; and[1997,*c. 249,*§1*(NEW).]

C.*At any time when windshield wipers are in constant use.*[1997,c. 249,*§1*(NEW).]



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