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We have decided that we will create a new garden this year at our new property. (Just a great reason to use the tractor and new tiller). We plan on a 1/2 acre garden (maybe larger). We would like to plant corn, tomatoes, peppers, beans, peas, zucchini, potatoes and watermelons at this time.

What is the best method (or combination of methods) for weed control between the rows of vegetables and plants?:confused:
 

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I used to plant 1/3 the garden in corn, break up the other 2/3 into related crops, and in the previous year look for people that baled hay that got rained on. would get hundreds of bales free, and spread that between all the rows except the corn. the corn would plant in rows, when it came out of the ground and got a few inches high, would hoe the dirt up against the corn, keep doing that until the corn was about knee high, then the corn would block the sun from the rows and most weeds wouldn't germinate. next year you can either plant between the hay or rototille it in, makes the soil nice after a few years, but do note that hay is adding more weed seeds each year, but your soil already has weed seeds or you wouldn't be asking. If you have a dry year hold moisture in, in a wet year keeps the water from splashing mud onto the plants, holds down diseases.
 

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I used to plant 1/3 the garden in corn, break up the other 2/3 into related crops, and in the previous year look for people that baled hay that got rained on. would get hundreds of bales free, and spread that between all the rows except the corn. the corn would plant in rows, when it came out of the ground and got a few inches high, would hoe the dirt up against the corn, keep doing that until the corn was about knee high, then the corn would block the sun from the rows and most weeds wouldn't germinate. next year you can either plant between the hay or rototille it in, makes the soil nice after a few years, but do note that hay is adding more weed seeds each year, but your soil already has weed seeds or you wouldn't be asking. If you have a dry year hold moisture in, in a wet year keeps the water from splashing mud onto the plants, holds down diseases.
Same here except with straw. That with a little weeding each morning with a hoe worked well. The straw holds in the moisture as well as reducing the number of weeds.
 

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Best - hand pulling weeds. But this is also the most labor intensive.

A small hand tiller will take care of between the rows, still need to hoe or hand pull in the rows.

Hay/straw/mulch works, but you will need to take care of the weeds that come up somehow.

You can also use herbicides, be cautious to not kill desired plants.

I like to get in early with the first tilling to get any weeds going, then burn it down with roundup.
Then I dig again and plant.
 

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We use Sunbelt ground cover fabric from Amazon on transplanted vegetables. I use a hot knife to melt holes in the fabric with the proper spacing between plants and use big wire staples about 4-6” long to keep fabric in place. Between the rows I put down 4’ wide fabric overlapping the 3’ wide fabric used for the plants. No weeds and keeps moisture in the ground and heats the soil up quickly in the spring. I try to get all the fabric rolled up and stored in the barn at end of season. Ive been using this for about 5 years and fabric is still in good shape. Best solution I’ve found so far. Between rows of direct sown seeds such as corn and green beans I use a Hoss wheel hoe with stirrup attachment and a regular stirrup hoe every few days until plants are big enough to shade out the weeds. I don’t use any weed sprays on the garden.
 

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We've been using a method called "Back to Eden". You can find it online. We spend very little time pulling weeds.

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More work in the beginning, but it will pay off in time.
 

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I have some Trifluralin,, I am going to try that this year,,,
 

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I am moving to drip irrigation this year to keep from watering the weeds too. Hopefully it cuts down weeds as much as advertised.
I use drip irrigation and it really does cut down on weeds, at least where i live, which is pretty dry.

I'm also pretty fussy about what I put in the garden as far as mulch goes. Whatever grass clippings we can find with no mature weed seeds.
 
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