Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know it's not green. Neither is my field cultivator and it's driving me nuts. But it is what is available in my area. We used to have an 8300 drill and we hated it with a passion so we upgraded to a NT 1590. Loved it but it's not mine and I can't use it anymore. Are those old IH drills any good? One guy says yes the other says no but he doesn't like single disk openers. Just looking to plant cover crop and wheat at the moment. I'm playing with planting a couple acres of beans with a 494-A this weekend where my friends 16 row corn/32 bean planter couldn't go. I figured I should get more opinions before I called the guy that's selling it.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,164 Posts
It'll do

We have a similar but different model IH drill- not the same model but honestly as planting implements go a drill is pretty basic. I think it looks like it's not a hydraulic lift but a chain lift. That's ok, but not great and a bit of a PITA if you have a cab tractor. Check all the openers, spin them over to see if bearings are bad, looked for cracked downspouts as those go bad just from sitting. If it is a chain lift, make sure it works and doesn't start halfway up and slip. Look at the chains and sprockets and see if he has drag chains for every row.

It may be just the picture but something looks odd about the hitch frame like the left side is normal but the right side comes off the drill at a 90 degree angle instead of the expected 45 or so. That could just be the picture rather than the drill.

Those had an optional grass seeder which went on the back for small seeds- that can be a plus if you are planting clover in your cover crop.

If it's sound, all the parts are there and work correctly and the price is right you can always get some green paint. . .

Treefarmer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
True story on the paint. I thought the wheel closest to the driveway looked off. I'll have to go look again. So a chain lift can't be switched to hydraulic?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,164 Posts
Chain lift

True story on the paint. I thought the wheel closest to the driveway looked off. I'll have to go look again. So a chain lift can't be switched to hydraulic?
It absolutely can be switched and I don't think it's that much of a project. It may be as simple as taking the chain lift mechanism out and dropping the cylinder in but it's been a very long time since we had a chain lift and that was an older Oliver drill. It shouldn't be a big deal anyway.

Treefarmer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,645 Posts
MIGHTbe an 8250. It looks to be in good condition. It has a grass seed attachment. The serial number plate should tell the model and will probably be located on the frame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I'm with DRobinson. It looks like a 8250. I have an 8300 and it looks heavier built. If I remember right the 82 was the lighter built drill. Again if I remember right the 00 series are straight grain drills with one hopper. The 50 series has two separate hoppers, one for fertilizer. That one does look like it has the grass seeder attachment. Might just be the picture but is the platform you stand on to fill the drill up missing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
588 Posts
Had (2) 8300 & both had metal tread plate to walk on. I did not have a grass seeder on them, but, other than that, it looks like the one pictured.

Edit, The ones I had, had 2 lids you could open up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
588 Posts
After looking at photos online of a 8250, I’d have to bet my life that the drill is a 8250. It is not a 8300.

It sure looks good!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
What are some things that are downfalls of these drill? I know it's location dependent but how much would one give for that drill? I didn't check bearings and such because it was raining. Like I said, dealer wants $3900. They have had it since late December if I recall right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,645 Posts
I'm with DRobinson. It looks like a 8250. I have an 8300 and it looks heavier built. If I remember right the 82 was the lighter built drill. Again if I remember right the 00 series are straight grain drills with one hopper. The 50 series has two separate hoppers, one for fertilizer. That one does look like it has the grass seeder attachment. Might just be the picture but is the platform you stand on to fill the drill up missing?
You could be right about the 8250 having a fertilizer box.

What are some things that are downfalls of these drill? I know it's location dependent but how much would one give for that drill? I didn't check bearings and such because it was raining. Like I said, dealer wants $3900. They have had it since late December if I recall right.
I have been away from the business far too long to give an educated guess on price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,164 Posts
No idea on price

I can't help you on price but any drill with a fertilizer spreader should be checked for rust, frozen bearings etc. Even the drop tubes and baffles can have a problem if fertilizer was left in the drill. If everything is good, a fertilizer box is very nice but it doesn't fertilizer can cause issues.

Treefarmer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
The tubes coming down from the small box don't go all the way to the opener. Is that characteristic of fertilizer or a grass box?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Personally If I was looking to spend 3900 for a grain drill it better double disc openers at a minimum and preferably press wheels behind it. That's a lot of money to be putting forth and to be quite honest this stuff is old technology because most farmers these days if they are looking to upgrade they are going to go with no-till drills.

Single disc openers have a couple serious disadvantages when compared to double disc openers. First the single disc cuts opens about a 1/2 trench and then lays the seed directly on top of the soil. It then has to be covered by either drag chains or a drag harrow then ideally cultipacked. A double disc opener will cut a 1/4" slit in the soil and then drop the seed between the two walls of dirt. A hard rain is usually sufficient enough to close the trench enough to get the seed to germinate. A double disc with packer wheels often times can be used in no-till type settings as long as it has enough down pressure to cut a slit in the soil. The second issue is with single disc openers is that they really like a well worked seed bed. I mean this by not much trash in the plot and worked soil so the angled disc can cut in the soil.

I have an old John Deere/Van Brunt drill that is 13 row single disc opener with a small seed box that I use quite a bit. While not ideal most of the stuff of plant is large grain (oat, winter rye, buckwheat, etc.) and it does what I need of it. The drill isn't ideal for my uses but I only paid 300 dollars for it. I just plant heavy seed rates and typically come up with very good stands. The small seed box shouldn't have the tubes by the trench because it will cause the seed to get planted too deep in most cases. Personally I've had better results with clovers/alfalfa by using a broadcast spreader or frost seeding.

Just keep your eyes open on craigslist. Seed drills pop up all the time on craigslist for really good prices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I agree that $3900 is too much. I would also prefer a NT drill but was curious as to if this would do the trick for awhile. Thank you for your response.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,164 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Not bad. How wide of a drill could a 50 hp tractor pull? A guy I know said to go look at a 13' but I wasn't sure if that was excessive or not. Local dealer also has a 450 with small seeds boxes and double openers. But it's 13' too. I pulled my 12' field cultivator pretty deep with no issues.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top