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I am not having a good two weeks.

Last week it was my battery that failed and had to be replaced. That wasted one Saturday.

Now today while bushhogging my tractor started pouring out thick black then white smoke out of the exhaust. It was so bad I tried to turn of the engine and this really freaked me out - when I tried to turn the engine off using the key it did not stop. It kept running and pouring smoke for about a minute before it stopped.

This is a two year old unit with not even 35 hours on it and I am really frustrated. I will be calling Ag Pro first thing on Monday but any input is welcome.

Here is a link to a quick video - https://www.dropbox.com/s/psrks8w6n4hl56v/2016-10-08 15.35.30.mov?dl=0
 

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Do not attempt to run the tractor again until this has been properly diagnosed! You could have a failed injector or injector pump which can allow the engine to "run away" as in have zero control. It can run on its own by ingesting uncontrolled fuel or even more common in diesels is an internal oil leak. They will run uncontrollably and eventually raise the rpm as the fuel (diesel or oil) leak gets worse to the point the engine fails.

I'm sorry you've got this issue. I hope it's easily found and repaired as this is a fairly rare issue with any modern diesel engine.
 

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I have been around equipment my entire life and never wittinessed this, I've only heard about it and seen videos on YouTube of a "run away" diesel. One thing I am certain of though, I applaud you for thinking to shoot a video during this. I don't think I would have thought of anything at all other than standing there with a thought of "oh sh*t"!
 

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I am not having a good two weeks.

Last week it was my battery that failed and had to be replaced. That wasted one Saturday.

Now today while bushhogging my tractor started pouring out thick black then white smoke out of the exhaust. It was so bad I tried to turn of the engine and this really freaked me out - when I tried to turn the engine off using the key it did not stop. It kept running and pouring smoke for about a minute before it stopped.

This is a two year old unit with not even 35 hours on it and I am really frustrated. I will be calling Ag Pro first thing on Monday but any input is welcome.

Here is a link to a quick video - https://www.dropbox.com/s/psrks8w6n4hl56v/2016-10-08 15.35.30.mov?dl=0
If you wouldn't mind, please post the serial number of your tractor. I noticed in the parts manual for Deere they show two different part numbers based upon a change in the pumps for units after production number 310001.

John Deere part number MIA881669 for tractors up to *********310000

John Deere part number MIA882413 for tractors built ******310001 and after......

Just FYI, the John Deere part number is MIA882418 for the 1025r units........

Not that the Injection pump has been confirmed as the problem, but I would like to confirm the serial number of these machines which are having problems. I am going to send member 2Lteacher a Private Message and ask him about his tractors vehicle I.D. number which Deere stepped up and helped repair even with 275 hours on the unit. Hopefully, he will respond. I also asked him to update his original thread or post on this thread about the final outcome of his dealings with Deere and I also inquired how his tractor has been running since the repair.

Maybe it's nothing and merely a coincidence, but it would be nice to know of the units having trouble are in the pump part number which has been replaced with a new part number. It seems odd that these 1023e units, which are produced in far lower volume than the 1025r, are having these issues. Perhaps I just haven't seen the threads on any failure issues of injector pumps on the 1025r tractors.

I know that based upon production numbers I found on a Deere website, it seemed like the 1025R were produced at a rate of 20 or 25 tractors (or perhaps even higher) for every 1 model 1023e produced. I am trying to nail down the actual numbers.

In the PM I sent the poster on the thread which Kenny linked from 2LTeacher, I asked him to post an update to either his original thread or this one about how his tractor is running and how Deere ended up handling his specific situation. If there is a pump issue, it would be helpful for alicat418, the OP of this thread to know as much as possible when he has to deal with his dealer.

It is worth a shot...:dunno:
 

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Could be a fuel injection problem. Bad pump or nozzle are likely culprits. Before doing anything else remove the fuel fill cap and take a whiff. If you smell gasoline there's your problem. Drain the tank and filters and refill with fresh, verified diesel. Add a triple shot of a good quality fuel system lubricant like this: Diesel Fuel Lube ? Best Price on Opti-Lube Additives
 

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Hiya,

As others have said, get it to the dealer and let them deal with it as it's 2 years old and should be under the powertrain warranty.

As far as a runaway Diesel, there are basically 2 types, Diesel or "other" fueled.

Diesel fueled are ones where the fuel is supplied by the injector pump and the key switch or mechanical fuel shut off does not have an effect, The easiest way to stop one of these is to cut or crimp off the fuel line from the tank and stop the flow of fuel to the pump starving the engine of fuel.

"Other fueled" runaways can be internal (blowby gasses, oil seal on a turbocharger/supercharger shaft) or externally fueled, (Natural gas, gasoline vapors, methane plumes at landfills for examples) External fueled are the most unpredictable as they are independent of mechanical state of the engine. The only way to quickly stop an "other fueled" runaway is to mechanically stop the flow of air into the engine with either a plugging object on the intake or by directing a CO2 or Halon fire extinguisher into the air intake starving the engine of oxygen, stopping the fuel from burning. Do not use your hand or a rag to plug the intake, as either can get sucked into the engine with bad results. If the engine is connected to a gear transmission, putting it in the highest gear and stomping the brakes can shut it down, that's what my brother did with a Detroit in a Chevy Titan cab-over years ago when the seals in the supercharger went and fueled the engine with oil.
 

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:munch::munch::munch:
 
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You did put diesel in the tank right?
 

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Could be a fuel injection problem. Bad pump or nozzle are likely culprits. Before doing anything else remove the fuel fill cap and take a whiff. If you smell gasoline there's your problem. Drain the tank and filters and refill with fresh, verified diesel. Add a triple shot of a good quality fuel system lubricant like this: Diesel Fuel Lube ? Best Price on Opti-Lube Additives
You did put diesel in the tank right?
This is the first thing I thought of. I like to look at the simple/easy/free diagnosis steps first.
 

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Hiya,

The Diesel trucks I have seen fueled with gasoline by mistake have simply shut off about a mile down the road. Gasoline has a higher auto-ignition temperature than Diesel, as there is no spark event to ignite the gasoline in the cylinder, the engine simply stops running. However, if the ratio of Gasoline to Diesel is low enough, it could continue to run poorly and would likely smoke white from the incomplete combustion.

In this case, the key switch/fuel shutoff solenoid had no effect on stopping the engine from running for almost a minute according to the OP, that would initially suggest a Diesel fueled runaway due to a malfunctioning injection pump. But as is the case with remote diagnosis, take it for what it's worth, free.

Tom
 

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This is my thought too Tom. Not a fuel problem but a fuel control problem.

I suspect a failed injector or pump. If the tip or check assembly failed within the injector, fuel could dribble at will from the line into the cylinder. This would explain why the engine continues to run after the injector pump solenoid shuts off. Of course a problem within the pump could also cause the same issue.

Either way, it could very detrimental to run this engine again without good precautions. Being that its under warranty, I wouldn't do a thing to it but call the dealer.
 

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This is my thought too Tom. Not a fuel problem but a fuel control problem.

I suspect a failed injector or pump. If the tip or check assembly failed within the injector, fuel could dribble at will from the line into the cylinder. This would explain why the engine continues to run after the injector pump solenoid shuts off. Of course a problem within the pump could also cause the same issue.

Either way, it could very detrimental to run this engine again without good precautions. Being that its under warranty, I wouldn't do a thing to it but call the dealer.
Must have missed the part about not being able to shut it down.
 

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I'll go with bad valve spring just to be different.
Saw it a a couple times with little engines. They were Kubotas though.
Same exact symptoms.

***edit
Doh
Reread original post.
Broken valve spring wouldn't let it keep running after key turned off.
 

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What would you do for a runaway diesel?

So this subject got me to wondering. I had never thought about, or heard about diesel runaway before, though now it makes sense how it happens. So I did a little research by googling "diesel runaway" and found quite a bit of information including many youtube videos. I've seen a few smoke billowing semis at the side of the road in the past, just never knew what was happening. Seems the best way to deal with a runaway in it's early stages is to shut off the fuel and/or air to the engine. BUT there is the danger of the overspeeding engine to throw a rod or something worse and sometimes the best course of action, if just shutting off the ignition or stalling it in gear doesn't work, is to get a good distance away and let it run it course.

I have a VWTDI and my 1026R, this thread got me to wondering what I would do if one of my diesels started to "runaway". Apparently runaways are rare, but it does happen. Some are fuel system related, some are fed by crankcase oil.

Here's my quick assessment of what I would "plan" to do:
VWTDI - 1. Shut off ignition.
2. Try to stall the engine by putting it in a high gear and letting out the clutch.
3. If all else fails (or if it were an automatic) open hood, and forceably pull off the diesel line from the fuel filter to the injector pump (my TDI has no lift pump in the tank, it is just vacuum fed by the injector pump).
4. Then somehow block the air from entering the manifold, either by moving the solenoid air valve in front of the intake manifold, or ripping off one of the air cleaner hoses and blocking it. (They say not to use your hand or a rag)
5. If that fails, walk away and watch the dollars go up in smoke, as it will eventually stop by itself.
6. Get some clean underwear.

1026R - I'd do basically the same as above, but instead of ripping off the fuel line, I'd shut the fuel valve on top of the water separator/filter assembly. Ripping off a fuel line is not a good idea unless you pull it off before the electric fuel pump. And since it's a hydro, it will not stall in gear, so I'd block the air to the air filter. Then get the clean underwear.

You know what they say about "the best laid plans" ... but I hope that in the heat of the moment, I'll remember some of this. I hope that it just won't be me running in circles with my arms waving and I'm yelling "Oh crap, Oh crap, Oh crap" :laugh:

So ... Any suggestions on what you would do differently?
 

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Hiya,

There are runaway protection systems. There used to be CO2 systems that were hard mounted to the intake system that were discharged by a pull cable in the cab on the old cab-over Internationals I used to wrench. The large industrial generator engines I serviced had simple slide gate valves, basically a square aluminum box in the intake pipe that had a slide plate that hung down by gravity and could be manually slid up to block airflow.

A quick google search finds a more modern system that should be adaptable to most Diesels. Here is the PDF: http://pacbrake.com/wp-content/uploads/PH1-PowerHalt-Data-Sheet.pdf

It should be noted that there are a lot of industries that require anti-overspeed valves be installed to prevent the potential for explosions and injury when the parts come out of the side of the block.

On a side note, some of the Diesel hot-rodders find out how easy it is to cause a pump related runaway when "turning-up the pump" or if they grind their fuel cam a little too much....
 

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You did put diesel in the tank right?
And HOPE the transport driver put the diesel fuel in the diesel tank and gasoline in the gasoline tank! From years of reading diesel pickup forums that happens very frequently, because No pickup driver ever put gasoline in his diesel truck..... yeah, right!

The most common means of shutting down diesel pulling tractors I've seen is to use a very large rain cap on the engine air intake and run the shutdown cable from the back of the tractor to the raincap where the cable holds the raincap open. Simply drilling holes in the raincap where the cap counterweight fits between the clamp/hinge with the raincap completely open. Pull the cable and the raincap closes shutting off airflow.
 
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