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Discussion Starter #1
Now that the last snowfall has melted here in central Illinois, I can see that the pipe that I put on the edge of the Meyer truck plow didn't prevent all the gravel from being picked up and deposited in the grass. I used some 1.5" diameter pipe and tack welded it to the blade. I'm sure that the pipe helped, but since there was still some gravel that I'll have to put back into the driveway, I'd like to get some advice on how to reduce that. The ground was pretty well frozen when I bladed the 4 - 5" snow, but perhaps the issue was operator technique. I tried to keep some of the weight off the blade, but I found it hard to find a balance of plowing effectiveness vs digging in a little. What is the best diameter of pipe to use? Would a rubber edge work better? I have about 1000 feet of gravel drive, and only a small area of concrete.
Here's a photo of the setup.
 

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You'll probably get differing opinions from folks using a "pipe-edge" VS those using a rubber edge on the plow. It's probably inevitable that some gravel is loosened and moved off the drive. Does your plow have skid shoes to keep the blade edge lifted slightly off the surface? In my opinion, unless you want to scrape down to the surface your blade edge should be ~1/4" to 1/2" high. Only way to do this is with skid shoes.

In my case I use a snowblower and follow-up with a blade in float position to get my paved surface as clean as possible. Then follow-up with ice-melt. I have a hill that likes to ice over.
 

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Having the blade out front is great for your neck,,, but,,,

The position control of the three point hitch does a MUCH better job of not moving gravel,,,
That is EXACTLY the design intent of the three point,,,

No pipe, no skids, just careful positioning of the blade stops gravel plowing for me,,

 

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Discussion Starter #4
You'll probably get differing opinions from folks using a "pipe-edge" VS those using a rubber edge on the plow. It's probably inevitable that some gravel is loosened and moved off the drive. Does your plow have skid shoes to keep the blade edge lifted slightly off the surface? In my opinion, unless you want to scrape down to the surface your blade edge should be ~1/4" to 1/2" high. Only way to do this is with skid shoes.

In my case I use a snowblower and follow-up with a blade in float position to get my paved surface as clean as possible. Then follow-up with ice-melt. I have a hill that likes to ice over.
Good point. No, I don't have skid shoes. The brackets are there but I was hoping that I wouldn't need them. My former tractor was an IH 404 and I used a rear blade with skid shoes on it. The skid shoes worked well but I didn't like driving on the snow first.
 
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Plow shoes can be your friend. I could be wrong but I would think the added weight of the FEL mount is adding to your dilemma in float mode.
 

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Plow shoes can be your friend. I could be wrong but I would think the added weight of the FEL mount is adding to your dilemma in float mode.
I tried float mode at first but you're right, it was too heavy. That's when I decided to try to manage the blade weight by taking some off using the loader lift. It's beginning to look like I need to think about adding shoes. The used blade that I bought didn't come with them, so I'd also welcome some suggestions on how to make them.
 
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Neb, I know you have posted pictures of your plow setup but could you post some/them here also?
Back of moldboard to the black frame would be good also.
 

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I tried float mode at first but you're right, it was too heavy. That's when I decided to try to manage the blade weight by taking some off using the loader lift. It's beginning to look like I need to think about adding shoes. The used blade that I bought didn't come with them, so I'd also welcome some suggestions on how to make them.
It's a Meyer blade so you can order the shoe brackets and shoes from any Meyer dealer. You can find shoes all over the net as well. Or you can scan Craigslist for an old beat-up blade and cut the mounts off of it and reuse them. Not sure if you have one near you but there is a local metal scrapyard up here that always has junk plows and they'll let you go in an torch stuff off of them for a few $$.
 
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Down & dirty fix? You could weld a couple of skids to the bottom of your pipe edge to set it off the bottom by ~ 1/2"

Maybe a couple of lengths of 3" wide x 6" long x 3/8" thick bar stock with the front angled up to prevent digging.
 

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Neb, I know you have posted pictures of your plow setup but could you post some/them here also?
Back of moldboard to the black frame would be good also.
Here is one photo from the operator seat. It shows the unused shoe bracket. It doesn't show the Meyer mechanism very well, but I can find one of that area too.
 

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It's a Meyer blade so you can order the shoe brackets and shoes from any Meyer dealer. You can find shoes all over the net as well. Or you can scan Craigslist for an old beat-up blade and cut the mounts off of it and reuse them. Not sure if you have one near you but there is a local metal scrapyard up here that always has junk plows and they'll let you go in an torch stuff off of them for a few $$.
Never thought of that! Thanks for the suggestion. It sure would be easier to buy them for around $35 a set from someone on eBay than to make my own!
 

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Down & dirty fix? You could weld a couple of skids to the bottom of your pipe edge to set it off the bottom by ~ 1/2"

Maybe a couple of lengths of 3" wide x 6" long x 3/8" thick bar stock with the front angled up to prevent digging.
Ran these for 20 some years...

IMG_3937_3.jpg _ DSC_0386_3.jpg

I started out replacing them when they wore out by removing the bad ones first, then I started just adding another piece on top of the wore out piece. They were welded right to the cutting edge.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ran these for 20 some years...

View attachment 123193 _ View attachment 123201

I started out replacing them when they wore out by removing the bad ones first, then I started just adding another piece on top of the wore out piece. They were welded right to the cutting edge.
I understand now. The photos really helped. I never noticed them on your front view photo before. The painted face on the blade kinda takes your attention away from the cutting edge :lol:
 

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Never thought of that! Thanks for the suggestion. It sure would be easier to buy them for around $35 a set from someone on eBay than to make my own!
I agree. :thumbup1gif:
Oh wait................ Meyer TM Shoe Bracket
 

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I understand now. The photos really helped. I never noticed them on your front view photo before. The painted face on the blade kinda takes your attention away from the cutting edge :lol:
I would just weld the 1/2" x 2" (+ or -) flat stock to the cutting edge, heat it up and bend it over.
 

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snow on gravel

I mentioned this on a past thread but will once again. If you look at the picture of the blade on a cement slab(not mine) you can see the gap between teh cutting edge and the blade is wide. The one on the loader is mine and the shoes are off the driveway but the blade is on the surface. I used asphalt millings. The other shows the shoes. You can see by tipping the dump cylinders the cutting edge contacts the driveway surface and then by rolling back (the slab picture not mounted) the gap widens, you just have to take a little times and set your shoe, mine are 3/4 inch off the pavement when the blade frame is straight. Works great as I can run high before the driveway freezes then on the neighbor's cement one I just tip forward and scrap it bare. When you tip forward you can not angle fully either way as the one corner or the other will hit and raise the other. If I really want to scrap the surface I put the tractor weight on the blade. Usually I float the control and use the dump control if need be. I can remove the snow off the lawn and not dig in as well
 

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What I do is the first few inches I pack the snow into the stone to make a base.As others said shoes will help you need wide enough one so the weight doesn't push them into the stone them you defeating the purpose.Having it on the loader makes a difference also.The angle (forward and backward) on the bucket curl will determine how the cutting will act.More forward will cut and scrape where back will skim and not be as aggressive.
 

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What I do is the first few inches I pack the snow into the stone to make a base.As others said shoes will help you need wide enough one so the weight doesn't push them into the stone them you defeating the purpose.Having it on the loader makes a difference also.The angle (forward and backward) on the bucket curl will determine how the cutting will act.More forward will cut and scrape where back will skim and not be as aggressive.
I've had a gravel driveway for over 40 years and I just don't have much luck with "leaving a base". Every time I do it ends up melting down to around 3/4" of solid ice that takes forever to melt and it creates a dangerous situation navigating to and from the vehicles.

I keep my snowblower skids adjusted about 1 3/4" up which allows me to remove deep snow without collecting any gravel. Then I use my rear blade, pushing backwards towards the curved side of the moldboard. This allows me to scrape it down to almost bare gravel without collecting many stones. I have driveway markers placed so I don't push any snow into the yard. The other advantage this gives is when the snow does pack from driving over it (like it did this last snow), I can run the blade forwards and very carefully allow the cutting edge to carve down the ice without gathering stones. It requires a delicate hand on the rockshaft lever but it works.

It's not perfect but it has worked. By scraping the driveway down to almost bare stones I get a complete melt to a bare dry driveway the first time we get a fairly sunny day, almost as quick as the folks with paved driveways.

When we only get a few inches of snow I skip the snowblower and only use the rear blade (pushing in reverse of course) :)
 

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Gravel drive

I've had a gravel driveway for over 40 years and I just don't have much luck with "leaving a base". Every time I do it ends up melting down to around 3/4" of solid ice that takes forever to melt and it creates a dangerous situation navigating to and from the vehicles.

I keep my snowblower skids adjusted about 1 3/4" up which allows me to remove deep snow without collecting any gravel. Then I use my rear blade, pushing backwards towards the curved side of the moldboard. This allows me to scrape it down to almost bare gravel without collecting many stones. I have driveway markers placed so I don't push any snow into the yard. The other advantage this gives is when the snow does pack from driving over it (like it did this last snow), I can run the blade forwards and very carefully allow the cutting edge to carve down the ice without gathering stones. It requires a delicate hand on the rockshaft lever but it works.

It's not perfect but it has worked. By scraping the driveway down to almost bare stones I get a complete melt to a bare dry driveway the first time we get a fairly sunny day, almost as quick as the folks with paved driveways.

When we only get a few inches of snow I skip the snowblower and only use the rear blade (pushing in reverse of course) :)
If you notice the on picture I posted with the blade tipped forward serves two uses. One on hard surface it will scrape but once the ground freezes it seems to work much like a under belly plow truck blade skimming over the frozen surface when in float. It is a matter of playing with it and getting use to the best way ti use it for your own needs. Every drive is different. Right now my surface it wet slop in places but froze solid 3 inches down and that makes for a mess in spots. It is 46 degrees here and the spring flowers are showing already
 
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