Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Newbie here just want some insight to the advantages and dis-advantages of electric vs. hrydulic used for the chute movement on a snow blower. This is going to a purchase over the summer so I'm trying to enlighten myself on this. I see that almost all manufacturers offer both type of set ups. I would think that the electric would be slow compared to the Hyd set up. All opinions are welcomed and encouraged .

Leaning to a rear mounted unit so I can keep the blade on or go back to the FEL.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,320 Posts
:wgtt:

-Electric is often easier for the average do-it-yourself'er, most feel intimidated plumbing and working with hydraulics.
-Hydraulics are a lot more money since buying some switches and wire is much cheaper than hoses, valves, motors and cylinders.
-Some electric setups are slower, like those with linear actuators, but some use window or other gear motors that can be reasonably fast.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,896 Posts
I don't own a snow blower, so I can't advise from experience. But electric would be considerably cheaper. Several members have done this to their blowers.

I changed your title so people can do future searches much easier. I hope you don't mind. :hi:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,542 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I don't own a snow blower, so I can't advise from experience. But electric would be considerably cheaper. Several members have done this to their blowers.

I changed your title so people can do future searches much easier. I hope you don't mind. :hi:
Not at all. I did search on here about the subject matter but with no luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #7

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
  • Like
Reactions: sterling40man

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
If cost wasn't the only factor between the two systems , what would you choose and why.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,067 Posts
If cost wasn't the only factor between the two systems , what would you choose and why.
I've never owned or operated a snowblower, so take my opinion for what it's worth.

With that said, it seems like hydraulic for rotation and electric for the deflector would be the way to go for ease of fabrication and reliability. Judging from what I've seen others do, the hydraulic setup ends up a cleaner install for rotation with fewer moving parts. Electric for the deflector because it can be done with a basic linear actuator and you can run a much smaller electric cable up the chute instead of a pair of bigger hydraulic lines.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,228 Posts
Do you already have a blower, or are you starting from scratch??

If you're adding on, all of the comments above apply. I would only add that on top of the hydraulic rotator and ram for deflector, you need the free hydro circuits on your tractor to run them.

If you're buying new, from what I've seen it's quite a lot cheaper to have the rotator/deflector added from factory than it is to add it later.

I currently have hydraulic rotation and deflection, but that came with a big cost to get the circuits added to make them run.

I wouldn't worry too much about speed - any speed is faster than getting out of your seat/cab constantly to aim your snow!!!

-J.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sterling40man

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,054 Posts
Mine is on a 314 garden tractor /49 blower, so only single hydraulics. I used an electric actuator for the deflector:

HPIM2527 (Small).JPG

For the rotation, I used a car window motor:

HPIM2525 (Small).JPG

HPIM2526 (Small).JPG

HPIM2529 (Small).JPG

The window motor is a little quick & jerky, but does the job. ~~ Lowell
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I have a 3pt. blower with hydraulic rotation. I think the advantage of hydraulic is there is more torque vs an electric rotator. I don't store my tractor in a heated garage and when using the blower snow piles all over the chute rotator gear and the motor. I sometimes am too cold or in a hurry to brush all the snow off of it so I park it in the shed the way it is when I'm done using it. That piled on snow becomes hard and sometimes ice. The next time I use it the hydraulic motor has no problem at all turning it even with all that caked on snow and ice on it. Where as if it was an electric rotator, I don't think it would. If you put your machine in a heated garage every time you're done using it I think an electric rotator would work fine. As far as speed..... Where I work I use a Kubota front mower that we put a blower on the front for winter. It has hydraulic rotation but I think it's too fast. I was thinking about that when I ordered my blower so I researched putting a restrictor in the hydraulic lines. After getting the blower and using it it turns at half the speed vs the kubota I use at work which is nice because it's not so touchy. When looking at cost... I think on my blower an electric rotator was pretty close to the cost of a hydraulic rotator. However you would obviously have to add a 3rd scv to run the hydraulic motor on the blower. And that cost me about 600.00 if I remember correctly. But... The rear hydraulics will come in handy for other implements I plan on purchasing in the future. I do plan on adding an electric chute deflector this summer which I think will cost about 150. There's my 2 cents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Well I'm looking to buy new so I would have the unit set up from the manufacturer from the get go. I just noticed that the three builders I'm looking at have all 3 options; manual, electric and hryd for both the chute rotation and deflector.

I appreciate all the insight that has been given by all. Thanks everyone who replied just need to convince wife that a snow blower is a 'needed' item not a want,,, lol
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,320 Posts
Well I'm looking to buy new so I would have the unit set up from the manufacturer from the get go. I just noticed that the three builders I'm looking at have all 3 options; manual, electric and hryd for both the chute rotation and deflector.

I appreciate all the insight that has been given by all. Thanks everyone who replied just need to convince wife that a snow blower is a 'needed' item not a want,,, lol
Just remember that you will spend $500-$1000 to add the needed hydraulics to the tractor, and it's not all a JD option.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,228 Posts
Or more than that.....


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,320 Posts
Or more than that.....
Yup, maybe. Brian at Fit-Rite could answer that, he has a four spool kit for the 1-series already, I am sure he could make it a two or three spool kit upon request.

Here is a cool PPT showing it (including TnT as well): Top n Tilt for JD 1000 series
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Advice from an Electro-Mechanical Engineer

I am an Electro-Mechanical Engineer so I can give you a little feedback about both electric and hydraulic systems. Electric systems are very sensitive to temperature and ambient moisture. As a result an electrical system must be designed very well to account for these draw backs. Additionally with an electric system, one must carefully design the protection circuitry (fuses/breakers) to avoid permanent damage to the rest of your equipment. Hydraulic systems, on the other hand, are essentially immune to all of the drawbacks listed above for electrical systems. Hydraulics are designed to operate in very harsh environments and generally have very few maintenance concerns. Whenever I design machinery, I always try to utilize elegant mechanical devices to reduce the electrical systems as much as possible. Just my $0.02 worth.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top