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I am completely new to tractors guys, so go easy on me. I have a 2 part question.

I have a new 1025R with a 47" blower on the front. Here in Maine we had about 6 inches of snow followed by 40 degrees and rain.. which made a perfect recipe for hard slush. Soupy, wet snow. My blower kept clogging and mostly I was pushing the snow around like a plow instead of actually blowing it. I realize it was very heavy and watery but, any tips on successfully getting the blower to work better with wet snow? I am surprised that the blower did not come with a cleaning tool as well.

Secondly, I think I am having my dealer install chains on the tires when they come to pick it up nest week to install the cab. My 00ft gravel driveway with a circular turn around on the end is very large and is also very icy. I was sliding, slipping and getting stuck a lot on declines. in Any suggestions or tips regarding tire chains?
 

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I think I can honestly say ...... nothing is going to move soupy, wet snow. The trick is to blow it before the rain or warmth gets to it. Had the same situation here in Mass yesterday, cept we only had about 2" .. then the rain and warmth hit. I pushed a little with the shovel and prayed the rain and warmth would take care of the rest.
 

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With the soup we got, blowers of any kind were less than effective. Not sure there is anything you can do with that kind of snow and a blower other than attaching a blade to the back and using that.

In terms of sliding - ballast is huge. Fill the tires, add wheel weights, add ballast box or weight rack. AND add chains. I have my large self, 250lbs of wheel weights, 175 lbs of tire fill, and 320lbs of suitcase weights. Makes a huge difference. So over 1000 pounds on rear . . . all of it needed to get up and down my hill.
 

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Are you running your blower at full PTO RPM? I have the 54-inch front blower and in 9 years of use have never had it clog up. Sometimes the goo along the road is just watery slush. It doesn't throw it as far but it never clogs. I have the steel impeller.

I've ran chains on all four tires since day one.
 

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Welcome from NW Ct.
We had the same kind of snow yesterday. But my 2038r with the SB 1154 rear snow blower and HLA 1500 snow pusher did fine but last night it got cold again and I had a ice skating rink this morning.
 
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wet heavy snow and slush is hard to move but spraying the blower and chute with silicone spray does help some. slowing down and letting the blower clear itself also helps. My old single stage blower actually worked better in the slushy snow. Tire chains and good ballast will greatly improve traction. I would suggest 2 link over the 4 link chains
 

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I did a write up on the Snow, snow and more snow thread today after yesterdays 4" snow, 40 degree and rain episode.. I had no problems at all with my 47" blower with steel impeller on a X738 and it was 2" of colored slushy water to blow after the rain and compression.. I was amazed and it never plugged up either.. Do you have the plastic impeller? When I had that which came with the new blower back in 2014 it plugged all the time, then reading here on GTT made me change my mind, and I am not sorry I did..
I know it's not the same machine but I have never used chains and my drive is all hills and long! Also asphalt, so I can't compare to your issue.
 

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I can feel your pain from down here in PA. I called it "bowling with snow" on my hilled driveway. This is the reason I set my 2025R with a loader and 3pt snow blower. Sunday night, I was all ready to go out and use the snow blower. By Monday morning, it was snow soup. The only options are 1) use the loader and scoop it (which is what I did) or 2) wait until it re-freezes and then try and snow blow the hard ice pack (which is what my neighbor did). As said above, you can't blow slush so if snow blower is the only option, you can wait until it re-freezes a little but hasn't quite turned into solid block of ice yet.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Are you running your blower at full PTO RPM? I have the 54-inch front blower and in 9 years of use have never had it clog up. Sometimes the goo along the road is just watery slush. It doesn't throw it as far but it never clogs. I have the steel impeller.

I've ran chains on all four tires since day one.
Yes, full PTO RPM.
 

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The quickest way to plug up the 47" blower is to go slow. Small amounts of slush that don't clear will build up and plug and plug bad.

With regular snow if it plugs, often just driving into a snowbank and really loading the blower will unplug it.

I have never had to use chains or ballast with the JD2305 and often blow paths out to my wood piles through deep snow that is 2 months old without problem.
 
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During extraordinary times, you have to do extraordinary things.

Use the blower any way you can to move the liquid cement out of the way. If the blower keeps plugging, turn off the PTO and simply push snow out of the way with the blower not blowing. The whole point is to clear paths of access. When conditions get abysmal, you do what you have to.

There were times I used my 47" snow blower as much as a snow pusher as I did a snow blower. Just understand that in exceptional times, the goal is to create access or create egress, not get the kind of results normally produced. Those can be worked towards once basic access is restored.

Ballast provides machine balance. When the super wet heavy snow is in front of the tractor, it creates a terrible imbalance of the machine. On ice or during conditions like you experienced, add as much ballast as you can as the more you add, the more you will move.

Ideally you should always have sources of ballast on hand during the winter. These should be 50 pounds bags of snow melt, bags of sand, etc. things which are heavy and also have another use in creating paths of access.

Sometimes, the conditions just suck and you do what you can to do what you must.
 

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The metal fan and flapper mod is the way to go .
 

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You can raise the blower and remove the upper portion of the snow on the surface as often, in such conditions where the snow is very wet and heavy, the wettest snow which has the most moisture and does the most plugging of the blower, is the snow closest to the ground. Gravity and ground temps take the water to the ground surface. Then shove the snow on the surface out of the way if needed after you have blown off the top layers (if possible).

You have to try different things to get the task done as well as possible. Although you have the 47" two state snow thrower, if its a newer blower, it likely has the composite impeller. Its not the material which makes the impeller a poor performer, its the design and shape of the impeller. The steel impeller has cup shaped ends on the impeller vanes, the composite impeller has flat vanes. If you were scooping water, would you rather use a cup or a flat knife? The composite impeller is like having flat flaps slapping at the snow. They are inferior for wet heavy snow.

See how this impeller has flat ends, like the flat knife shape?

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This is the older impeller, which has more of a cup shape and is made of steel. See the difference in how the ends are shaped for cupping and throwing the snow out of the chute? Note the corner edges sticking up at the end of each vane? Also, the entire shape of the impeller vane is more cupped from the center outward, where the newer impeller is pieces of flat material.

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You probably wonder, "Why would they have changed the impeller to the new design?" It's easy, its a composite piece which is likely molded into shape using an automatic plastic injection molding machine. The old impeller is a fabricated piece, which is made by cutting pieces of steel, assembling them in a jig and welding them. Then the impellers have to be balanced or they tear the bearings out of the gear box. Its much easier to balance a plastic molded piece than balancing a steel piece which has been assembled and welded.

. The composite impeller is about 1/3rd to 1/4th of the cost of the steel impeller. Its faster to make and less costly. The cost difference is around $400 between the two impellers, if I recall. The composite impeller was around a buck fifty ($150) where the fabricated impeller was around $550 to $600.

You should have plenty of rear ballast, even with a cab. I would say a minimum of 400 pounds on the 3ph. On my 1025r, I carry 850 pounds much of the winter as rear ballast and I have the Mauser cab, which weighs over 425 pounds itself and is not included in the ballast calculations, just like the operators weight isn't included either. Those are in addition to the 3ph ballast amounts.

My 850 pounds of 3ph ballast are all weight on the 3ph, not including the cab. My ballast is made from the I Match hitch 85#, the 3ph carry all platform 100#, the 512# pound cylinder of concrete which is strapped to the carry all, and 150# pounds of calcium chloride in 5 gallon buckets with lids on them. (85+100+512+150 = 847#)

You didn't mention which tires are on your machine, but the Versa Grips are incredibly superior in snow and slop and pretty much all conditions to the R4's. If you have the R4 tires, you should at a minimum, groove the tires and create edges for the tires to grab to help with traction in poor conditions.

To be honest, with the right tires, the correct amount of ballast and the machine set up correctly and used properly, you should be able to go without tire chains unless you spend a great deal of time on sheer / sheet ice. Most people don't use these machines on sheer ice often.

You will find your experiences with this snow are the exception and not the rule, especially in Maine. As long as you don't get hurt, don't get stuck and avoid damaging things, you can learn as you go...........and you will. Just pay attention to those who do this very often as they have dealt with numerous situations and can always figure a way to get the task handled.

Another important reminder is try and stay up with the storm instead of waiting until its all over with. Its easier to clear 8" of snow 3 times in a day than it is to clear 24" of snow all at once...........especially when conditions are turning against you with warming temps, etc.

Remove as much snow as you can and if there are concerns about falling temps and the conditions turning to ice, get as much of the snow as possible pushed off to the side and spread snow melt on what remains. Good products, like Calcium Chloride can actually melt a much larger amount of snow per salt crystal. I was showing someone this AM where I threw the snow melt on the road and each small crystal of snow melt the size of a pencil eraser in diameter, would melt a circle around itself on the road surface, the size of a baseball. The snow melt actually will heat the pavement with its chemical reaction and cause much more snow or ice to melt ,
The worst snow clearing conditions are when the temp is at or above freezing temps. Between 32 and 40 degrees is miserable and you just have to do what you can. As far as waiting for sloppy slushy snow to freeze once again to then clear it, I wouldn't approach that situation in that manner. Would you rather bail the water out of a boat with a bucket or have to chip the ice out with a hammer and pick ONE CUBE AT A TIME, to get the boat where it can be used again?
 
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+1 on the silicone, go to Walmart and buy a 1/2 dozen cans of CRC 556 or CRC silicone and hose the the thing down before you start, the wetter the snow the more effect it will have.
 

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I got a chute cleaning tool for a walk behind blower along with the mounting clips and attached it to my blower. I later mounted it in my cab when I got the 1026R. I maybe use it once or twice a season. I believe mine was made for an Arins blower. Saw it in a story and thought it was a good idea and bought it 20 or 25 years ago
 

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I am completely new to tractors guys, so go easy on me. I have a 2 part question.

I have a new 1025R with a 47" blower on the front. Here in Maine we had about 6 inches of snow followed by 40 degrees and rain.. which made a perfect recipe for hard slush. Soupy, wet snow. My blower kept clogging and mostly I was pushing the snow around like a plow instead of actually blowing it. I realize it was very heavy and watery but, any tips on successfully getting the blower to work better with wet snow? I am surprised that the blower did not come with a cleaning tool as well.

Secondly, I think I am having my dealer install chains on the tires when they come to pick it up nest week to install the cab. My 00ft gravel driveway with a circular turn around on the end is very large and is also very icy. I was sliding, slipping and getting stuck a lot on declines. in Any suggestions or tips regarding tire chains?
 

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Hello from snowy Canada...We have the same JD 1025R and the same blower. Unfortunately you can't blow wet snow - do it before turns into wet slush. And yes, chains on the tires work great. We have them on the back tires.
Thanks, J.
 

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I got a chute cleaning tool for a walk behind blower along with the mounting clips and attached it to my blower. I later mounted it in my cab when I got the 1026R. I maybe use it once or twice a season. I believe mine was made for an Arins blower. Saw it in a story and thought it was a good idea and bought it 20 or 25 years ago
Same here. Those tools are inexpensive and can be used with any blower. I use mine mostly for cleaning out the blowers nooks and crannies prior to parking in the garage to minimize the water puddles from melting snow.
 
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@SulleyBear I use the blower like a box blade a lot with very small amounts of snow and push to the edges. Turn on the PTO and clean up the edges for the final pass.
 
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