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Discussion Starter #1
There has been lots of discussion regarding traction with R4’s when plowing and in mud. Basically they are worthless, doesn’t matter how much ballast you add (I have loaded rear tires and a ballast box), chains at all four corners are the only option If you want traction and steering control, especially with an angled blade and on hills. I plow about 2 tenths of a mile of driveway, one area is brick and has a sideways slope, without chains the tractor will just slide off the driveway. Next to the quick connect angle blade, chains are best investment I made when it comes to snow plowing.
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Agree 100% except only chains on the rear of 1025r
 

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chains at all four corners are the only option If you want traction and steering control, especially with an angled blade and on hills.
I agree. Been doing it for 32 years.
 

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chains at all four corners are the only option If you want traction and steering control, especially with an angled blade and on hills.
Same here. I don’t have mine on yet due to the wet winter we’ve had here. I didn’t have any problem yesterday but it was a light fluffy snow. Wet snow or a little icy and chains is the only way.
 

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Put chains on every tractor I owned as they were needed for plowing snow, spreading manure etc. Had chains for all the skidders and the class 8 trucks. Because of running the tractors on the roads we switched to the grader style chains over the double rings as the ride was better. A trade off but worth it.
 

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#chainsrule

I get so tired of the “my tractor is better because I never need chains” people. If you don’t need chains you either have no hills or not pushing enough snow.

My tractor is chained up every winter and still have chains for each of our vehciles.
 

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There has been lots of discussion regarding traction with R4’s when plowing and in mud. Basically they are worthless


I will agree that other tread patterns work a little better in snow, the use of the word "worthless" is being over dramatic. For what you are describing, you will need chains regardless of tread pattern. There simply is no magic tire out there that will go through snow like creamed corn through a baby.

Next big snowfall, drive around and observe the tires on the snow removal equipment. You will see most running R4's. If they were "worthless", these contractors would change their tires in fall for snow removal season.
 

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Chains on brick would scratch, no? The rubber Terra Grips might be better, I don't know. I have them on the rear for snow blowing-bumpy ride though.
That’s why I opted for H pattern chains - don’t even feel them. Plus the fact they won’t work down between the lugs on R4’s.

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Discussion Starter #11
Compromise or maybe useless might have been a better description. In any event, the R4 tread lasts forever and the wider footprint allows the tractor to float better in soft ground conditions. I average about 180 hrs a year, mowing, loading, landscaping, logging, grading gardening, hauling, snow plowing and backhoe use. The R4 is the best compromise for me, however in mud and snow, with my terrain conditions, they are pretty useless.

There are a number of reasons and circumstances why you don’t see some large snow removal equipment with chains. The chains are extremely heavy, not easy to mount or take off and very expensive. They hinder equipment use when needed for alternative applications. Most of the time they are working on relatively level, paved areas and chains can damage the pavement with wheel spin. With that said, If you travel snow prone areas of the west it would be rare to see a dedicated piece of snow removal equipment without chains. Loggers also chain their equipment for additional traction.
 

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Chains on brick would scratch, no? The rubber Terra Grips might be better, I don't know. I have them on the rear for snow blowing-bumpy ride though.
They do scratch the bricks but so does the cutting edge of the blade. They are refractory bricks, not pavers so a few scratches here and there don’t hurt.
 

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#chainsrule

I get so tired of the “my tractor is better because I never need chains” people. If you don’t need chains you either have no hills or not pushing enough snow.

My tractor is chained up every winter and still have chains for each of our vehciles.
I don't have hills, and my driveway is concrete, but my little 1023E with R4's, ballast, and no chains will push snow til the 6 foot pusher is full to spilling out the sides and over the top and will do that the length of the driveway, even when it's snow-packed. It just won't turn.
 

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Chains or no chains? All I will say, is that "you don't plow my drive and I don't plow yours". Your mileage may vary!
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Chains on brick would scratch, no? The rubber Terra Grips might be better, I don't know. I have them on the rear for snow blowing-bumpy ride though.
I put down 22,000 pavers to do my drive and have used a steel blade and chains for years. Its no different than concrete or asphalt. Any marks seem to eventually go away.
 

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I put down 22,000 pavers to do my drive and have used a steel blade and chains for years. Its no different than concrete or asphalt. Any marks seem to eventually go away.
Plus if you don't spin the tires NO MARKS. with chains. and like POPPi said eventually they go away.

When a deep or wet snow and hard to push take smaller portions instead of trying to take a full blade width everytime.
If tires start to spin, it tells you , You are taking to big a bite, going to fast , or not enough ballast or all 3 .
 

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Plus if you don't spin the tires NO MARKS. with chains. and like POPPi said eventually they go away.

When a deep or wet snow and hard to push take smaller portions instead of trying to take a full blade width everytime.
If tires start to spin, it tells you , You are taking to big a bite, going to fast , or not enough ballast or all 3 .
I can't help myself. I plow/push the snow in high gear, and skidding around is just part of the enthusiasm. The traction on my setup without chains is good enough that on my flat driveway and can push a pusher full to overflowing with heavy wet snow all the way down my driveway without problem.
 

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I can't help myself. I plow/push the snow in high gear, and skidding around is just part of the enthusiasm. The traction on my setup without chains is good enough that on my flat driveway and can push a pusher full to overflowing with heavy wet snow all the way down my driveway without problem.

Great you have a flat driveway,, a lot of us DON'T.

I Plow in Low Range majority of the time... One not planning on buying another tractor.

and second I was taught years ago, you take care of your equipment and it will last you.. No matter the vehicle, treat it correctly and it should last you a LONG TIME.

Yes I've plowed in H range , a dry maybe 6" snow, but even then not full out. Throttle 28-2900RPM and maybe 1/2 pedal.
Everything made can break ,,, so why help it break.. Maybe not this winter or next ,,but it will.

Yes even with me and others plowing slowly , parts have broken,
 
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