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When I bought my 1025R in August, I included a 54" snow blower on the order. The dealer told me they could not get it in until late September, but it wasn't a big deal since we don't usually get snow that early. Because of some problems I had with the initial delivery of the tractor, mowing deck, and front blade, and because I paid for setup, I asked them to install it and make it work when it was delivered. They agreed, and a technician came with the snow blower to take care of it. Unfortunately, they forgot some parts and could not complete the install. I needed to mow one more time and so I put the mowing deck back on. I agreed to complete the snow blower install if they would give me the parts.

One bizarre aspect of the snow blower is that they only give you one drift cutter depending on the type of tractor you have. (It even says this in the manual!) I wasn't happy about this, and the dealer told me he will give me a second one. (Still on order.) This still doesn't make sense to me. If I have to cut crosswise through a big drift on my driveway, it's quite irrelevant what type of tractor I'm driving.

So I picked up most of the missing parts when I was at the dealer for something else and embarked on the installation myself. There were a couple of problems installing the shaft from the mid PTO to the front of the tractor. The front end was over-painted and it wouldn't go far enough into the bushings to get it onto the PTO at the back end. I had to take the shaft back out and scrape the paint off, even sand it a little, then clean it and re-grease it. After all of that, I still couldn't get it to lock into the mid PTO spindle. I finally figured out there was a protective plastic sleeve hidden inside the connector on the shaft. The manual specifically mentioned to remove the protective sleeve on the other end (which was painfully obvious), but said nothing about this plastic insert that was pretty hidden. The manual also mentions a torque spec on the bushing hardware, but there's no clearance to get a torque wrench with a socket on it into the space between the bushings. The supplied bolts were too long. But I got it together and "estimated" the torque and now it works smoothly.

I then discovered that the pin on the quick hitch would not go all the way into its hole to lock the angle at 0 degrees for the blower. I released the pressure in the hydraulic lines and was able to line the holes up and feel the pin from the bottom, but it still wouldn't go in, even with some help from a rubber mallot. (I decided against trying a sledge hammer since I knew I would need to take it out at some point.) I decided to loosen the big nut on the pivot point pin on the bottom of the hitch to see if there was some play there. I have a wrench that size (1 1/8"), but I couldn't budge it. My biggest socket was only 1 1/16", so I ended up using a large, long-handled pipe wrench and all my strength. It finally turned. At 2 or three turns, the pin went into the hole. The nut was still plenty tight, so I suspect that it was over tightened and somehow distorted the hitch assembly.

The hydraulic lines that came on the blower had right angle connectors on the ends. There were also connectors appropriate for the 1025R in the parts bag, but I had to change them out. I was careful to release the pressure and I took extreme precautions to deal with the hydraulic fluid that I knew was coming, but I still managed to make a mess in the driveway.

I was ready to test the shaft and see if the blower worked. The dealer had generously greased the shaft in every conceivable place. I know now that I should have wiped off any excess grease before firing up the PTO. Little did I know that the shaft is self-cleaning!! Several more marks in the driveway.....

So I'm all ready to hook up the chute hydraulic lines and wrap this project up. And they're too short!!! If I take both lines straight back from the snow blower housing to the 1025R connection points (not bothering to go through the hooks on the side of the tractor, just straight over the top of the front wheel), the black line is about 12 inches too short and the yellow line is about 4 inches too short. I even removed the housing of the chute angling hydraulic cylinder to see if there might be more hose hiding inside. Nothing doing. So I'll call the dealer again tomorrow.

If it weren't for the rest of you on this forum, I would be concluding about now that I am the first person to own this tractor and I'm helping to debug the design, manufacturing, and delivery processes.
 

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When I bought my 1025R in August, I included a 54" snow blower on the order. The dealer told me they could not get it in until late September, but it wasn't a big deal since we don't usually get snow that early. Because of some problems I had with the initial delivery of the tractor, mowing deck, and front blade, and because I paid for setup, I asked them to install it and make it work when it was delivered. They agreed, and a technician came with the snow blower to take care of it. Unfortunately, they forgot some parts and could not complete the install. I needed to mow one more time and so I put the mowing deck back on. I agreed to complete the snow blower install if they would give me the parts.

One bizarre aspect of the snow blower is that they only give you one drift cutter depending on the type of tractor you have. (It even says this in the manual!) I wasn't happy about this, and the dealer told me he will give me a second one. (Still on order.) This still doesn't make sense to me. If I have to cut crosswise through a big drift on my driveway, it's quite irrelevant what type of tractor I'm driving.

So I picked up most of the missing parts when I was at the dealer for something else and embarked on the installation myself. There were a couple of problems installing the shaft from the mid PTO to the front of the tractor. The front end was over-painted and it wouldn't go far enough into the bushings to get it onto the PTO at the back end. I had to take the shaft back out and scrape the paint off, even sand it a little, then clean it and re-grease it. After all of that, I still couldn't get it to lock into the mid PTO spindle. I finally figured out there was a protective plastic sleeve hidden inside the connector on the shaft. The manual specifically mentioned to remove the protective sleeve on the other end (which was painfully obvious), but said nothing about this plastic insert that was pretty hidden. The manual also mentions a torque spec on the bushing hardware, but there's no clearance to get a torque wrench with a socket on it into the space between the bushings. The supplied bolts were too long. But I got it together and "estimated" the torque and now it works smoothly.

I then discovered that the pin on the quick hitch would not go all the way into its hole to lock the angle at 0 degrees for the blower. I released the pressure in the hydraulic lines and was able to line the holes up and feel the pin from the bottom, but it still wouldn't go in, even with some help from a rubber mallot. (I decided against trying a sledge hammer since I knew I would need to take it out at some point.) I decided to loosen the big nut on the pivot point pin on the bottom of the hitch to see if there was some play there. I have a wrench that size (1 1/8"), but I couldn't budge it. My biggest socket was only 1 1/16", so I ended up using a large, long-handled pipe wrench and all my strength. It finally turned. At 2 or three turns, the pin went into the hole. The nut was still plenty tight, so I suspect that it was over tightened and somehow distorted the hitch assembly.

The hydraulic lines that came on the blower had right angle connectors on the ends. There were also connectors appropriate for the 1025R in the parts bag, but I had to change them out. I was careful to release the pressure and I took extreme precautions to deal with the hydraulic fluid that I knew was coming, but I still managed to make a mess in the driveway.

I was ready to test the shaft and see if the blower worked. The dealer had generously greased the shaft in every conceivable place. I know now that I should have wiped off any excess grease before firing up the PTO. Little did I know that the shaft is self-cleaning!! Several more marks in the driveway.....

So I'm all ready to hook up the chute hydraulic lines and wrap this project up. And they're too short!!! If I take both lines straight back from the snow blower housing to the 1025R connection points (not bothering to go through the hooks on the side of the tractor, just straight over the top of the front wheel), the black line is about 12 inches too short and the yellow line is about 4 inches too short. I even removed the housing of the chute angling hydraulic cylinder to see if there might be more hose hiding inside. Nothing doing. So I'll call the dealer again tomorrow.

If it weren't for the rest of you on this forum, I would be concluding about now that I am the first person to own this tractor and I'm helping to debug the design, manufacturing, and delivery processes.
Thank you for posting this as I'm doing initial install of my 54" blower this week. Your help is much appreciated.

Shame on your dealer!

I'm a new member but have been lurking for a while. I would guess 75% of problems relate to dealer assembly and set up. My dealer thankfully did a vg job for the most part.

I am surprised JD doesn't do more of the assembly at the factory. They lose control using their present system.

Just my 2 cents.

Phil
 

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I'm not going to comment on most of the initial problems you mentioned because I have no experience with SB mounting on the 102X series. That being said all SB up-stop and implement drive kits I've used include the specific hydraulic hose extensions and adapters needed to match-up to your machine. Any chance these parts are missing? Did you receive a parts list with your literature kit?
 

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Good post keane. Like Phil D stated, it may help others.
Love the self-cleaning comment. :lol:
 

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I just dropped my off at the dealer today to get the snow blower set up, I had told him I would just pick it up when it came in and do it myself, he said " I don't think you want to do that, let us do it" i'm starting to understand why!
 

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Sorry your having some much trouble, sounds like most of the trouble is from your dealer setup. Dealer had installed mine and tested it before delivery in July. I had connected mine for about 5 min then, so Sat I installed everything except the blower. At first one of the hoses was to short, till I seen the one hose was wrapped down under the lift cyl on frt quick hitch....DAh..:dunno:
One day this week I might try the blower just for safety sake, but I feel it should be OK .. I have to say I have a pretty good dealer.
 

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When I bought my 1025R in August, I included a 54" snow blower on the order. The dealer told me they could not get it in until late September, but it wasn't a big deal since we don't usually get snow that early. Because of some problems I had with the initial delivery of the tractor, mowing deck, and front blade, and because I paid for setup, I asked them to install it and make it work when it was delivered. They agreed, and a technician came with the snow blower to take care of it. Unfortunately, they forgot some parts and could not complete the install. I needed to mow one more time and so I put the mowing deck back on. I agreed to complete the snow blower install if they would give me the parts.

One bizarre aspect of the snow blower is that they only give you one drift cutter depending on the type of tractor you have. (It even says this in the manual!) I wasn't happy about this, and the dealer told me he will give me a second one. (Still on order.) This still doesn't make sense to me. If I have to cut crosswise through a big drift on my driveway, it's quite irrelevant what type of tractor I'm driving.

So I picked up most of the missing parts when I was at the dealer for something else and embarked on the installation myself. There were a couple of problems installing the shaft from the mid PTO to the front of the tractor. The front end was over-painted and it wouldn't go far enough into the bushings to get it onto the PTO at the back end. I had to take the shaft back out and scrape the paint off, even sand it a little, then clean it and re-grease it. After all of that, I still couldn't get it to lock into the mid PTO spindle. I finally figured out there was a protective plastic sleeve hidden inside the connector on the shaft. The manual specifically mentioned to remove the protective sleeve on the other end (which was painfully obvious), but said nothing about this plastic insert that was pretty hidden. The manual also mentions a torque spec on the bushing hardware, but there's no clearance to get a torque wrench with a socket on it into the space between the bushings. The supplied bolts were too long. But I got it together and "estimated" the torque and now it works smoothly.

I then discovered that the pin on the quick hitch would not go all the way into its hole to lock the angle at 0 degrees for the blower. I released the pressure in the hydraulic lines and was able to line the holes up and feel the pin from the bottom, but it still wouldn't go in, even with some help from a rubber mallot. (I decided against trying a sledge hammer since I knew I would need to take it out at some point.) I decided to loosen the big nut on the pivot point pin on the bottom of the hitch to see if there was some play there. I have a wrench that size (1 1/8"), but I couldn't budge it. My biggest socket was only 1 1/16", so I ended up using a large, long-handled pipe wrench and all my strength. It finally turned. At 2 or three turns, the pin went into the hole. The nut was still plenty tight, so I suspect that it was over tightened and somehow distorted the hitch assembly.

The hydraulic lines that came on the blower had right angle connectors on the ends. There were also connectors appropriate for the 1025R in the parts bag, but I had to change them out. I was careful to release the pressure and I took extreme precautions to deal with the hydraulic fluid that I knew was coming, but I still managed to make a mess in the driveway.

I was ready to test the shaft and see if the blower worked. The dealer had generously greased the shaft in every conceivable place. I know now that I should have wiped off any excess grease before firing up the PTO. Little did I know that the shaft is self-cleaning!! Several more marks in the driveway.....

So I'm all ready to hook up the chute hydraulic lines and wrap this project up. And they're too short!!! If I take both lines straight back from the snow blower housing to the 1025R connection points (not bothering to go through the hooks on the side of the tractor, just straight over the top of the front wheel), the black line is about 12 inches too short and the yellow line is about 4 inches too short. I even removed the housing of the chute angling hydraulic cylinder to see if there might be more hose hiding inside. Nothing doing. So I'll call the dealer again tomorrow.

If it weren't for the rest of you on this forum, I would be concluding about now that I am the first person to own this tractor and I'm helping to debug the design, manufacturing, and delivery processes.
This is exactly why I installed my own. Was NOT hard to do. Time consuming yes. Hard no.
 

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I'm quite familiar with the issue of the short hydraulic hoses for the cylinder that rotates the chute. I had been putting off purchasing a blower trying to get by with a the 54" front blade and the loader on the 3720 for the heavier snows. As the snows accumulated last winter and I started to run out of room to push the snow, and an approaching monster winter storm that was predicted, I bit the bullet and purchased the 54" blower. I already had the mid pto and quick hitch for my 52 broom installed so all I had to do was hook up to the blower and go. Not so fast.

I too discovered that the hoses to the chute cylinder were as you said about 12" too short. It was too late to get new hoses but I had fabricated some extensions a few years ago when I used my brother's 47" blower from his 425 on my X748. Other than looking like some classic red neck engineering it worked fine long enough to get new hoses. I called my dealer the next morning and he brought new hoses and installed them. The hoses are not the same as the factory hoses as they are considerably stiffer and more difficult to attach and detach in cold weather so they are ordering new hoses and and will be installed probably in the next week or so.
 

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The hoses are not the same as the factory hoses as they are considerably stiffer and more difficult to attach and detach in cold weather so they are ordering new hoses and and will be installed probably in the next week or so.
Interesting. I always thought the JD OEM hoses were unusually stiff in cold weather. I recently replaced brand new JD hoses on a rear blade because they were too long. The JD hoses had a ribbed plastic feel to them and were very stiff. The replacement hoses I got at the local hydraulic shop are very smooth and flexible. Much more rubber-like.
 

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I'm quite familiar with the issue of the short hydraulic hoses for the cylinder that rotates the chute. I had been putting off purchasing a blower trying to get by with a the 54" front blade and the loader on the 3720 for the heavier snows. As the snows accumulated last winter and I started to run out of room to push the snow, and an approaching monster winter storm that was predicted, I bit the bullet and purchased the 54" blower. I already had the mid pto and quick hitch for my 52 broom installed so all I had to do was hook up to the blower and go. Not so fast.

I too discovered that the hoses to the chute cylinder were as you said about 12" too short. It was too late to get new hoses but I had fabricated some extensions a few years ago when I used my brother's 47" blower from his 425 on my X748. Other than looking like some classic red neck engineering it worked fine long enough to get new hoses. I called my dealer the next morning and he brought new hoses and installed them. The hoses are not the same as the factory hoses as they are considerably stiffer and more difficult to attach and detach in cold weather so they are ordering new hoses and and will be installed probably in the next week or so.
The blower kits are all the same from what I am told by the dealer. The hoses are the right length for the shortest installation. All other set ups come with the appropriately sized "extension hoses" to match the installation that it is ordered for. I think they were in the up stop kit. So you already had the kit for the broom and did not order the kit for the blower. That is why you did not get the correct hose extensions.

Hoses are stiff. Once they are on for the winter, I do not take them off.... No need with the blower to use the FEL. Blower throws it way out of the way.

Bill
 

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When I bought my 1025R in August, I included a 54" snow blower on the order. The dealer told me they could not get it in until late September, but it wasn't a big deal since we don't usually get snow that early. Because of some problems I had with the initial delivery of the tractor, mowing deck, and front blade, and because I paid for setup, I asked them to install it and make it work when it was delivered. They agreed, and a technician came with the snow blower to take care of it. Unfortunately, they forgot some parts and could not complete the install. I needed to mow one more time and so I put the mowing deck back on. I agreed to complete the snow blower install if they would give me the parts.

One bizarre aspect of the snow blower is that they only give you one drift cutter depending on the type of tractor you have. (It even says this in the manual!) I wasn't happy about this, and the dealer told me he will give me a second one. (Still on order.) This still doesn't make sense to me. If I have to cut crosswise through a big drift on my driveway, it's quite irrelevant what type of tractor I'm driving.

So I picked up most of the missing parts when I was at the dealer for something else and embarked on the installation myself. There were a couple of problems installing the shaft from the mid PTO to the front of the tractor. The front end was over-painted and it wouldn't go far enough into the bushings to get it onto the PTO at the back end. I had to take the shaft back out and scrape the paint off, even sand it a little, then clean it and re-grease it. After all of that, I still couldn't get it to lock into the mid PTO spindle. I finally figured out there was a protective plastic sleeve hidden inside the connector on the shaft. The manual specifically mentioned to remove the protective sleeve on the other end (which was painfully obvious), but said nothing about this plastic insert that was pretty hidden. The manual also mentions a torque spec on the bushing hardware, but there's no clearance to get a torque wrench with a socket on it into the space between the bushings. The supplied bolts were too long. But I got it together and "estimated" the torque and now it works smoothly.

I then discovered that the pin on the quick hitch would not go all the way into its hole to lock the angle at 0 degrees for the blower. I released the pressure in the hydraulic lines and was able to line the holes up and feel the pin from the bottom, but it still wouldn't go in, even with some help from a rubber mallot. (I decided against trying a sledge hammer since I knew I would need to take it out at some point.) I decided to loosen the big nut on the pivot point pin on the bottom of the hitch to see if there was some play there. I have a wrench that size (1 1/8"), but I couldn't budge it. My biggest socket was only 1 1/16", so I ended up using a large, long-handled pipe wrench and all my strength. It finally turned. At 2 or three turns, the pin went into the hole. The nut was still plenty tight, so I suspect that it was over tightened and somehow distorted the hitch assembly.

The hydraulic lines that came on the blower had right angle connectors on the ends. There were also connectors appropriate for the 1025R in the parts bag, but I had to change them out. I was careful to release the pressure and I took extreme precautions to deal with the hydraulic fluid that I knew was coming, but I still managed to make a mess in the driveway.

I was ready to test the shaft and see if the blower worked. The dealer had generously greased the shaft in every conceivable place. I know now that I should have wiped off any excess grease before firing up the PTO. Little did I know that the shaft is self-cleaning!! Several more marks in the driveway.....

So I'm all ready to hook up the chute hydraulic lines and wrap this project up. And they're too short!!! If I take both lines straight back from the snow blower housing to the 1025R connection points (not bothering to go through the hooks on the side of the tractor, just straight over the top of the front wheel), the black line is about 12 inches too short and the yellow line is about 4 inches too short. I even removed the housing of the chute angling hydraulic cylinder to see if there might be more hose hiding inside. Nothing doing. So I'll call the dealer again tomorrow.

If it weren't for the rest of you on this forum, I would be concluding about now that I am the first person to own this tractor and I'm helping to debug the design, manufacturing, and delivery processes.
What you are describing is what I feel like each and everyday of my life:mocking:
I finally bought a second drift cutter last winter, after operating 6 years with only 1.
 

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When I bought my 1025R in August, I included a 54" snow blower on the order. The dealer told me they could not get it in until late September, but it wasn't a big deal since we don't usually get snow that early. Because of some problems I had with the initial delivery of the tractor, mowing deck, and front blade, and because I paid for setup, I asked them to install it and make it work when it was delivered. They agreed, and a technician came with the snow blower to take care of it. Unfortunately, they forgot some parts and could not complete the install. I needed to mow one more time and so I put the mowing deck back on. I agreed to complete the snow blower install if they would give me the parts.

One bizarre aspect of the snow blower is that they only give you one drift cutter depending on the type of tractor you have. (It even says this in the manual!) I wasn't happy about this, and the dealer told me he will give me a second one. (Still on order.) This still doesn't make sense to me. If I have to cut crosswise through a big drift on my driveway, it's quite irrelevant what type of tractor I'm driving.

So I picked up most of the missing parts when I was at the dealer for something else and embarked on the installation myself. There were a couple of problems installing the shaft from the mid PTO to the front of the tractor. The front end was over-painted and it wouldn't go far enough into the bushings to get it onto the PTO at the back end. I had to take the shaft back out and scrape the paint off, even sand it a little, then clean it and re-grease it. After all of that, I still couldn't get it to lock into the mid PTO spindle. I finally figured out there was a protective plastic sleeve hidden inside the connector on the shaft. The manual specifically mentioned to remove the protective sleeve on the other end (which was painfully obvious), but said nothing about this plastic insert that was pretty hidden. The manual also mentions a torque spec on the bushing hardware, but there's no clearance to get a torque wrench with a socket on it into the space between the bushings. The supplied bolts were too long. But I got it together and "estimated" the torque and now it works smoothly.

I then discovered that the pin on the quick hitch would not go all the way into its hole to lock the angle at 0 degrees for the blower. I released the pressure in the hydraulic lines and was able to line the holes up and feel the pin from the bottom, but it still wouldn't go in, even with some help from a rubber mallot. (I decided against trying a sledge hammer since I knew I would need to take it out at some point.) I decided to loosen the big nut on the pivot point pin on the bottom of the hitch to see if there was some play there. I have a wrench that size (1 1/8"), but I couldn't budge it. My biggest socket was only 1 1/16", so I ended up using a large, long-handled pipe wrench and all my strength. It finally turned. At 2 or three turns, the pin went into the hole. The nut was still plenty tight, so I suspect that it was over tightened and somehow distorted the hitch assembly.

The hydraulic lines that came on the blower had right angle connectors on the ends. There were also connectors appropriate for the 1025R in the parts bag, but I had to change them out. I was careful to release the pressure and I took extreme precautions to deal with the hydraulic fluid that I knew was coming, but I still managed to make a mess in the driveway.

I was ready to test the shaft and see if the blower worked. The dealer had generously greased the shaft in every conceivable place. I know now that I should have wiped off any excess grease before firing up the PTO. Little did I know that the shaft is self-cleaning!! Several more marks in the driveway.....

So I'm all ready to hook up the chute hydraulic lines and wrap this project up. And they're too short!!! If I take both lines straight back from the snow blower housing to the 1025R connection points (not bothering to go through the hooks on the side of the tractor, just straight over the top of the front wheel), the black line is about 12 inches too short and the yellow line is about 4 inches too short. I even removed the housing of the chute angling hydraulic cylinder to see if there might be more hose hiding inside. Nothing doing. So I'll call the dealer again tomorrow.

If it weren't for the rest of you on this forum, I would be concluding about now that I am the first person to own this tractor and I'm helping to debug the design, manufacturing, and delivery processes.
While this is a frustrating experience, I have found that after each of these experiences, I have gained very valuable knowledge which only helps me solve other issues on the tractor as they arise.

Heck, last winter I walked into my local dealers Service Department and two techs were struggling with replacing the blower chute cable on the 47" blowers which makes the chute smoothly roll from side to side. There is a very definate winding procedure of specific directions for that cable and the two techs looked at me like I must have been the guy who designed it when I walked up and put it on in CORRECTLY in about 2 minutes and it actually worked.

Truth was I had struggled to replace the cable on mine just a few days before so I had learned the hard way, which made me seem even smarter than I really am.....:thumbup1gif:

Once done, now learned!
 

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As some have said, the chute rotation hoses that are on the 54" snow blower are the shortest needed for any of the tractors that this blower can be used on. This would include models with front mounted hydraulic connects. Because the 1025R has the hydraulic connections under the right foot rest, the supplied hoses are not long enough. The listing of parts needed to install this blower on a 1025R includes two extension hoses. The dealer should have known that. I have included pictures of the hoses that my dealer installed on my 54" blower.
Dealers can make or break the tractor.
 

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Well, after reading Keane's issues with his initial set up, install of 54" snowblower, I figured I better install mine on my 1025 r to make use all is well, before it snows. All went well until I went to install the front side of the pto shaft thru the two bearings which would then get connected to the coupler on the drive shaft to the snowblower. The pto shaft was not over painted like Kane's but the tolerances are so tight between the pto shaft and the bearings that once in it was so tight it would not move freely. (I greased everything first). So 2 hours later nothing is finished. I'm not sure what to do but I'm going to take the shaft off this morning and sand it a little and see if I can get some movement enough to connect the rear coupler of the pto shaft to the MM pto. The pto shaft is 5 sided and the 2 bearing are 5 sided too. This is far from a easy set up. Laying under the tractor with a 40lb shaft trying to line it up with two free moving 5 sided bearings. The first one was easy. Not so with the 2nd.

Looking for ideas from the forum?
 

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Well, after reading Keane's issues with his initial set up, install of 54" snowblower, I figured I better install mine on my 1025 r to make use all is well, before it snows. All went well until I went to install the front side of the pto shaft thru the two bearings which would then get connected to the coupler on the drive shaft to the snowblower. The pto shaft was not over painted like Kane's but the tolerances are so tight between the pto shaft and the bearings that once in it was so tight it would not move freely. (I greased everything first). So 2 hours later nothing is finished. I'm not sure what to do but I'm going to take the shaft off this morning and sand it a little and see if I can get some movement enough to connect the rear coupler of the pto shaft to the MM pto. The pto shaft is 5 sided and the 2 bearing are 5 sided too. This is far from a easy set up. Laying under the tractor with a 40lb shaft trying to line it up with two free moving 5 sided bearings. The first one was easy. Not so with the 2nd.

Looking for ideas from the forum?
Loosen the three mounting bolts for one of the bearing retaining flanges. This will allow you to insert and align the PTO extension shaft through both bearings. After the shaft is in place re-tighten the bearing retaining flange bolts. You'll be good to go.

Frank
 

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Loosen the three mounting bolts for one of the bearing retaining flanges. This will allow you to insert and align the PTO extension shaft through both bearings. After the shaft is in place re-tighten the bearing retaining flange bolts. You'll be good to go.

Frank
That is a very good thought. Thank you very much!

Was a banker most of my life but now retired and polishing my mechanical skills. Lol.
 

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That is a very good thought. Thank you very much!

Was a banker most of my life but now retired and polishing my mechanical skills. Lol.
Ok...what ended up working was removing the bracket with the 2 bushings, then inserting the front end of the pto shaft, lubricating it again and moving it back n forth using a rubber hammer. After a few times it loosened up and I was then able to install it on the tractor.

The other thing never mentioned in the manuals is that the MMM lift arms have to be removed to install the back end of the pto shaft on the mm pto.

4 pins did it and I'm good to go.

First time is always the hardest.

Phil
 

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Ok......................
The other thing never mentioned in the manuals is that the MMM lift arms have to be removed to install the back end of the pto shaft on the mm pto.

Phil
No you don't. You only need to remove the rear horizontal mower deck latching shaft. It has a nut securing it at each end on the lifting arms.
 

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No you don't. You only need to remove the rear horizontal mower deck latching shaft. It has a nut securing it at each end on the lifting arms.
I know where you are coming from. Talked to the dealer, they recommended taking the arms off. 4 pins. I just had to be careful that I kept the yokes from coming out of adjustment. Mounted them on a small board, R & L. And zip tied them so they stayed the same. I may take your approach next time.

Thanks

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Add a nut to keep adjustment stable

I know where you are coming from. Talked to the dealer, they recommended taking the arms off. 4 pins. I just had to be careful that I kept the yokes from coming out of adjustment. Mounted them on a small board, R & L. And zip tied them so they stayed the same. I may take your approach next time.

Thanks

Phil
Hello Phil,

I had the same concern about these yokes. I added a nut to each thread to lock the adjustment in place when I take them off. You need two nuts, 3/8-24. And I added an "R" and an "L" marked on the side facing out.

Keane
 
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