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When to pick up parts at the dealer today and got to look at the new 1026R, WOW!
The 1026R is one stout built tractor. Much more so than the 2320/2520/2720. I was impressed. I envision JD selling lots of these little work horses.
Just sayin.
 

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I hear ya!

There seems to be a few people who are critisizing the new 1-series machines, in particular for the plastic hood/fenders etc. I can't help but wonder if maybe they are so focused on the plastic they miss the incredible frame and other structural components...the components that really matter.

My guess is many who now applaud the ruggedness of a 110TLB may have older siblings or dads who questioned the plastic on them when first introduced to the market.

I think JD has a winner here and I think the backbone on these machines will soon have many appreciating the lack of dents and rust afforded by the current 3000 & 4000 series designs. :flag_of_truce:
 

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Don't forget that the original 7 horsepower, three-speed 110 had fiberglass hood and fenders. The fibreglass fenders were replaced by steel for the second production year, but the fiberglass hoods are still used on current lawn and garden models. Cub Cadet tried to use their steel hood as a selling point. When a customer raised an objection about the strength of the JD hood, we used to climb on the hood and stand on it to show the strength. A small amount of polish makes the hood on my 16 year old 445, look like new. The plastic hood wouldn't be a concern. I think, however, that I might prefer steel fenders.

Don
 

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Don't forget that the original 7 horsepower, three-speed 110 had fiberglass hood and fenders. The fibreglass fenders were replaced by steel for the second production year, but the fiberglass hoods are still used on current lawn and garden models. Cub Cadet tried to use their steel hood as a selling point. When a customer raised an objection about the strength of the JD hood, we used to climb on the hood and stand on it to show the strength. A small amount of polish makes the hood on my 16 year old 445, look like new. The plastic hood wouldn't be a concern. I think, however, that I might prefer steel fenders.

Don
Very interesting information on the 110 lawn and garden tractors, I did not know they went from plastic to steel! I was refering to the 110 TractorLoaderBackhoe though, and the fact that it is a rugged plastic commercial/construction machine.

Question, when you said..."When a customer raised an objection about the strength of the JD hood, we used to climb on the hood and stand on it to show the strength." Are you refering to a plastic hood here? I'm not too familiar with the 445!

One thing we can all agree on....in this country we don't have to have the same opinions!

Thanks again Don
 

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I bought my first sub compact a 1026R a month ago. I researched ad nauseum and comfortably decided on the JD unit and it has been great. I made a minor adjustment to the MMM front draft link nuts and the deck goes off & on just like the videos. I also washered up the rear lock tab through bolts as described here on the forum. I don
 

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I don't mean to run anyone's machine down, that's not cool, but I do have preferences based on personal experiences.

This is a good article on plastic.... it's why I still prefer steel, cast iron and the best grades of aluminum. Unless John Deere is using a new kind of plastic plastic starts to degrade right out of the mold. http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=1655#_Plastics,_Not_as

I'm old school, heavy duty and trouble free makes me happy.

That's why I like capitalism, some other company's bean counters are ready to capitalize on their competition's design flaws.

I have no brand loyalty, I only care about who manufactures the best stuff at a fair price and who has parts available years after the warranty period is over. So far John Deere has been good to me on all counts. I have other hobbies and interests not just tractors..... My John Deere's reliability, ruggedness and low operating costs is what allows me to pursue my other interests.

In twenty years I have only spent $250 - $300 replacing normal wear and tear parts. It's never been in the shop, just the way I like it.:good2:
 

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Very interesting information on the 110 lawn and garden tractors, I did not know they went from plastic to steel! I was refering to the 110 TractorLoaderBackhoe though, and the fact that it is a rugged plastic commercial/construction machine.

Question, when you said..."When a customer raised an objection about the strength of the JD hood, we used to climb on the hood and stand on it to show the strength." Are you refering to a plastic hood here? I'm not too familiar with the 445!

One thing we can all agree on....in this country we don't have to have the same opinions!

Thanks again Don
Marine:
I should have been more specific on the 110 model designation. I was referring to the original 110 Lawn and Garden tractor that came out in the early sixties. The original lawn and garden tractors had fiberglass hoods and rear fenders. I can remember seeing my Dad jump on the hood to show the strength of the fiberglass hoods. These were more fiberglass than plastic. You could see the fibers on the underside. As I recall, the reason for changing to steel fenders was cracking due to vibration with the fiberglass.

I guess you could say, arguably of course, that the original 110 was the grandfather of what most of us talk about on GreenTractorTalk and live with today. As a teenager at the time, I was in tall cotton on that 7 horsepower, three speed John Deere 110. If I remember correctly, the second year which was an 8 horsepower, 4 speed, the selling price was $895. I would buy a trailer load of new ones for that today!

Sergeant, you are right about opinions in this country. You, many others on this forum, and I spent countless years doing our part to guarantee that. The best education and friends in my life came from the US Army.
 

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Marine:
I should have been more specific on the 110 model designation. I was referring to the original 110 Lawn and Garden tractor that came out in the early sixties. The original lawn and garden tractors had fiberglass hoods and rear fenders. I can remember seeing my Dad jump on the hood to show the strength of the fiberglass hoods. These were more fiberglass than plastic. You could see the fibers on the underside. As I recall, the reason for changing to steel fenders was cracking due to vibration with the fiberglass.

I guess you could say, arguably of course, that the original 110 was the grandfather of what most of us talk about on GreenTractorTalk and live with today. As a teenager at the time, I was in tall cotton on that 7 horsepower, three speed John Deere 110. If I remember correctly, the second year which was an 8 horsepower, 4 speed, the selling price was $895. I would buy a trailer load of new ones for that today!

Sergeant, you are right about opinions in this country. You, many others on this forum, and I spent countless years doing our part to guarantee that. The best education and friends in my life came from the US Army.
Maybe not the best for me but darn close, US Navy 74 -80.
Semper-Fi my DoD brothers:drinks:
 

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I was going to add this on the thread about engines and the great smell of diesel exhaust in the morning. Yes, it beat Folgers and also ranks far above the smell of napalm in the morning.

Hooah!
 

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I was going to add this on the thread about engines and the great smell of diesel exhaust in the morning. Yes, it beat Folgers and also ranks far above the smell of napalm in the morning.

Hooah!
:lol: :lol: Something tells me we won't get any differing opinions on this one!!!
 

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I don't mean to run anyone's machine down, that's not cool, but I do have preferences based on personal experiences.

This is a good article on plastic.... it's why I still prefer steel, cast iron and the best grades of aluminum. Unless John Deere is using a new kind of plastic plastic starts to degrade right out of the mold. http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=1655#_Plastics,_Not_as

I'm old school, heavy duty and trouble free makes me happy.

That's why I like capitalism, some other company's bean counters are ready to capitalize on their competition's design flaws.

I have no brand loyalty, I only care about who manufactures the best stuff at a fair price and who has parts available years after the warranty period is over. So far John Deere has been good to me on all counts. I have other hobbies and interests not just tractors..... My John Deere's reliability, ruggedness and low operating costs is what allows me to pursue my other interests.

In twenty years I have only spent $250 - $300 replacing normal wear and tear parts. It's never been in the shop, just the way I like it.:good2:

Very interesting article on plastic degradation!

I certainly take away the thought that for preservation environments, particulary where room temperature and humidity are controlled, steel for instance will be more durable than current known plastics.

While I can not offer scientific statistics to support my observations, it is difficult for me to ignore the various times I have experienced plastics outlasting steel when presented with the harsh environment associated with natures temperature and moisture extremes especially when adding salt and or reducing the effectiveness of protective paint coatings via scratches etc. This statement must be qualified however, it does not stand up to other extremes such as what would be encountered by structural requirements, requirements I continue to prefer steel for.

Thanks for informative article tackit!
 

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Very interesting article on plastic degradation!

I certainly take away the thought that for preservation environments, particulary where room temperature and humidity are controlled, steel for instance will be more durable than current known plastics.

While I can not offer scientific statistics to support my observations, it is difficult for me to ignore the various times I have experienced plastics outlasting steel when presented with the harsh environment associated with natures temperature and moisture extremes especially when adding salt and or reducing the effectiveness of protective paint coatings via scratches etc. This statement must be qualified however, it does not stand up to other extremes such as what would be encountered by structural requirements, requirements I continue to prefer steel for.

Thanks for informative article tackit!
Welcome Sarge. No doubt about the ruggedness of some of todays plastics, but like you say structural concerns have to be taken into account.
 
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