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Discussion Starter #1
Well.. we finally got around to transplanting our volunteer tomatoes into our second garden. The second garden is a considerable distance from the house but very close to the well head. I decided to install an exterior spigot in the side of the well house and have it piped (washer hosed) to a spigot on the well head itself. When I was testing this setup running the hose wide open I saw no real issues but now that I run it with a broadcast sprinkler I noticed the pump seems to be short cycling. We have a pressure vessel in our crawlspace that serves the house but perhaps there is a check valve directly upstream of said pressure vessel? I am currently not at home to check.. just started thinking about it after breakfast.

If there is a check valve I may install a smaller pressure vessel to serve the "exterior" spigot at the well head - ie, it would be between the spigot attached to the well head and the spigot I installed in the side of the well house. This summer I will likely continue to use broadcast sprinklers but next year we may go to drip irrigation. Next year I may also install a solar powered irrigation system in our pond and use that as the primary irrigation source, so I don't necessarily want to sink a whole lot of money into this arrangement.

Anyone have any thoughts on or experience with well head spigots?
 

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The purpose of the pressure tank it to keep pressure on the system so that the pump doesn't have to come on every time someone turns on the tap or flushed the john (sorry Johns). The pump keeps the tank pressurized between a certain range, and the tank uses the compressed air in the tank to keep the water lines pressurized. Depending how much you are pumping out of the spigot at the well house will determine how big of a pressure tank you need. The other option is to relocate the pressure tank from under your house to the well house. I'm not sure what the advantage is to have the pressure tank closer to the house. Maybe someone can provide some insights on that?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm not entirely sure how/why its occurring but almost as soon as I turn on the spigot at the well the pump is kicking on. It seems I am not feeling any of the pressure in the tank under the house. I'm starting to wonder if there isn't just some latency involved in the water changing direction and coming back out toward the well head after the pump kicks off.
All this said when we purchased this property we were told it was original and the house was built in 1992 so.. perhaps I'll replace the pressure tank under the house then move the old one out to the well house. Locating it downstream of the spigot on the well head but upstream of the exterior spigot.
 

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Sounds like your pressure tank is water logged, meaning there is no air space left to compress, so as soon as you turn on the faucet, the system pressure drops and the pump kicks on.
If it's a bladder type tank, the bladder may be ruptured. If it isn't a bladder type tank, then the water in the tank will eventually dissolve the air.
There shouldn't be any check valves in the system except the one at the discharge of the pump (assuming a submersible pump).

It really doesn't matter too much where in the circuit that the pressure tank is located. The size is important, I like to have a 60 gallon tank or so, But now they have new variable speed pumps, that only need a small tank.

I'm not sure what you mean by a "well head spigot" Maybe you mean a "yard hydrant"?

You are referring to a well house, a washer hose, a well head, and a well head spigot. I can't visualize what you have. maybe a picture and a sketch of the whole system would help.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Good call.. will go take some pictures now. I'm also going to go see what I can determine about the current pressure tank. I would not be surprised if it has reached end of life.
 

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Good call.. will go take some pictures now. I'm also going to go see what I can determine about the current pressure tank. I would not be surprised if it has reached end of life.
If the tank has a valve stem similar to a tire you can check the air pressure and add if necessary. Do this with the tank empty (no water) and usually about 2 lbs of air pressure below what the turn on pressure is for the pump. Some (maybe most) well pumps don't like to be short cycled and may not last long.
 
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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Pictures, it did happen

At this point I have determined that there is little to no pressure in my pressure tank and am waiting on my compressor to fill my air bomb to refill it. I allowed the well pump to recharge the system and pushed in on the air valve for a quick second just to see if air or water would come out.. air came out so at this point I am optimistic that the bladder is still intact. We'll see whether or not adding air has any impact. Though I wouldn't mind replacing the pressure tank - one b/c its old and two b/c I hate the current location. Since they didn't install any unions up/down stream of the tank I'll be cutting it out anyway.

In a related note: what do you all think of putting water filters in parallel? We currently have only a single filter that fills quite often. I figure if I put two in parallel we should see more flow and longer intervals between changing. I've also considered installing a spin down sediment filter ahead of the standard filter also.



And finally, as promised, pictures..

Spigot at well head:
IMG_20150525_100458_130.jpg

Exterior spigot in well house wall:
IMG_20150525_100509_535.jpg
IMG_20150525_100520_859.jpg

Washer hose used to connect the two spigots:
IMG_20150525_100555_818.jpg
 

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As Gizmo was saying don't over fill your pressure tank.. I have a air gauge showing how much air is in my tank. Guessing if pressure regulator hasn't been changed should kick on somewhere around 45# off at 50-55..
 

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Putting the 2 filters in parallel should work fine. I don't know how that well head spigot is plumbed in. They don't do wells like that in my neck of the woods because of the extreme cold.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Putting the 2 filters in parallel should work fine. I don't know how that well head spigot is plumbed in. They don't do wells like that in my neck of the woods because of the extreme cold.
Its just tapped in the line coming up out of the well, the line turns and goes down next to the well casing where it turns to poly and runs to the house. Obviously this puts that spigot upstream of any filtration... which is fine considering this spigot will only be used for the garden.
 

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I had two filters in parallel with ball valves at both ends. That way either filter could be serviced 'on the fly.' It worked quite well.

The advice you've gotten is spot on regarding your air tank. Turn the pump off, drain off the pressure until it's just a trickle. Check and charge the air bladder with a spigot still open so the displaced water has a place to go. Close the spigot, turn the pump on and resume normal operation. :good2:
 

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Its just tapped in the line coming up out of the well, the line turns and goes down next to the well casing where it turns to poly and runs to the house. Obviously this puts that spigot upstream of any filtration... which is fine considering this spigot will only be used for the garden.
Plumbed that way, you should put a backflow preventer on the hydrant/spigot so water from your garden dosent backflow into your house/drinking system.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Plumbed that way, you should put a backflow preventer on the hydrant/spigot so water from your garden dosent backflow into your house/drinking system.
I was waiting for someone to warn me about that.. I forgot to get one of these for the exterior spigot.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well, it held the charge for about 20 minutes.. no more short cycling. I'll drain the system and check the pressure again in a week or so. Thanks guys!
 

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Well, it held the charge for about 20 minutes.. no more short cycling. I'll drain the system and check the pressure again in a week or so. Thanks guys!
I check ours a couple times a year and add air when needed. I don't know where the air goes but once in a while it does need air.
 
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I check ours a couple times a year and add air when needed. I don't know where the air goes but once in a while it does need air.
Yeah.. the last time I changed the water filter I didn't notice any short cycling but it was certainly happening this go around. Hopefully it hadn't been happening for too long but the well pump is also original (>20yrs old) so it's due for replacing soon as is.
 

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I check ours a couple times a year and add air when needed. I don't know where the air goes but once in a while it does need air.
Back in the day before we had "city water" the old pressure tank (no bladder) would get water logged
sometimes.
Had a valve about midway of the tank where you could bleed off the water and make an air gap.
Old Fairbanks Morse pump, them were the days.:laugh:
 
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